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going to retire. Doc and wife say..."RETIRE" now. 31 yrs of teaching and coaching has taken it's toll on me. Not sure if I want to now.....sort of need to be in the right frame of mind...I know..."what mind"....beat u to it Chef! :D I have 1 more hr left before x-mas vacation! Would love to come back and get pi$$ed off and say "here are your keys" and keep walking! That's exciting to know u can do that and never look back! Oh well, it's a little scarey to think about it....... :yes:
HAPPY Holidays....

:a13:


bruce aka "the blue trawler"

:blw1:
 

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I know the feeling having to think about retiring. I will be doing it in approx. 18 months. It is scary. But think of the things you will be able to do and places to visit. The time will be yours and your wife's. Enjoy it, no one knows how much time we have on this earth. I have had six close friends pass away in the last 4 years. They were waiting for a better time to enjoy life. Guess what, they were called before they really got a chance to enjoy life. I just came from a funeral parlor to pay my respect to a dear friend's mother who was 65. Time is so short and so many things to do and see. DO IT! :)
 

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Walking

Bruce........I was also apprehensive about not working. Figured I wouldn't be able to handle not going to work on a regular basis. Believe me, it is great. I kept getting job offers for the first year or so but luckily I turned them all down.
I can get along just fine and my only boss is my sickle.
Go for it.
Jerry

 

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I don't know your situation Blue, but I "quit working", I didn't retire, the day I was financially able! That was 16 years ago when I was 36. I don't regret any part of not working! A job was never a big part of my life or entertainment!

I lost my Father at the age of 58, he was sick from the age of about 50. He never got to enjoy life much outside of a job! :( I'm living life to it's fullest for my Dad and myself. I also had the opportunity to be with my Daughter all through her school years. I could be at all school functions, join her for lunch in her grade school years, walk her to the bus stop with the rest of the Mom's, and just be there for her. I wouldn't trade any second of those memories for all the jobs and money in the world!

Best of luck on your decision! Life is short, but just how short will your's be?
 

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Bruce,

Glad you are up and around. All I can say is, If you can afford to retire, then there really is no question.

Sure it will seem odd at first, but you will fill your time with other things and be happier.

Quality of life is the way I wanted to measured. Not how much assets I left behind.

But when it comes down to it, Only you can answer the Question.

All the best

Bulldog & Meesh
 

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Bruce:

We have been to GWRRA meetings together, I was your Ride Educator and we rode together. The best advise that I can give is Eddie Bauer's Slogan:


"Do Not Confuse Your Career With Having A Life"


My best to you and yours, ENJOY !

VA-Deano
 

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Here's a sobering thing to do...take a tape measure and run it out on the floor to 75 or 80 ( what ever you feel the normal life expectancy is) then put your finger on your age. see how much is gone and how much is left.
I too was scared when GM made me an offer. 35 yrs of service 53 yrs old. I took it and don't regret it. Everyone is different aand I know you'll make the right decision for you.. Good luck what ever it is. Heading for Fla monday for the winter :drive1: :drive1:
 

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Just say YES...!!!! I retired at 47...I'll be 61 in march...and if I had it to do over...I WOULD SHOOT FOR 40....!!!!!

Never really began to live until I quit working every day. I look back and wonder how I ever managed to work all those years.

I wouldn't trade ANYTHING for the past 14 years...we have ridden the bike (several bike's actually) over many part's of this country...and favorite parts many times...and have plans to leave right after the first of the year to head down to the Tx/mex border and ramble westward along the border for a month...or two...or maby even three...depending on how the weather is and if we're having fun...we will be in a jeep wrangler and aspen classic mc camper...a great winter combo...

Do it....then get out and start living right away...don't sit down and say I'll go "next year"...you'll never go if you do that...so start planning a trip where you wanna go now and leave asap....

Have fun...!!!!
 

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Bruce, I retired two years ago at the age of 53 and I don`t like it................................... I LOVE IT !!! :D When people ask what I do with my time, I tell them " whatever I want ". Some even ask if there are times when I get bored and I always give them the same answer " if I`m bored it`s because I choose to be, as nothing`s stopping me from doing whatever I want to, on any given day". The longer you sit on the fence, the more life will pass you by. Ultimately the decision is yours alone, so good luck with whatever you decide.

Enjoy !
 

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Retirement

Put in my papers to retire from the Air Force Reserve 1 June 2004, after 28 years. Looking forward to it. Considering my options right now for retirement from the police department. I will have 26 years there in Feb. I am considering taking the deferred retirement option plan. I would retire in Feb, continue to work and draw full pay for the next 5 years while the pension fund pays my pension to an interest bearing account. I would leave in 5 years with a lump sum payment and start drawing my pension.
 

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Retirement

I retired young and have never looked back. I believe that if you are an active individual with a lot of outside interests, there will not be enough hours in the day to do all you would like to do. Everything you have always wanted to do is now possible. Those rides you have wanted to take, the fishing trips or just taking time to visit family. Best part is you can leave early and take in all the sights you never had time for. A couple of years ago I was on a ride with two buddies and we were on a ferry boat crossing Lake Champlain. We met this school teacher on a three day holiday. He asked us what our schedule was. We told him we were headed toward Maine and didn't really have a schedule. We would get there when we got there and see all we wanted to see on the way. He shook his head in disbelief and just couldn't believe it. Everything he did was on a schedule. When you retire you can take it all in at a relaxed pace and not miss a thing.
 

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dissenting voice?

Retirement is a lot to think about. Do you enjoy your profession? Do you feel self-actualized while you do it? Does your job add to your sense of self esteem? Do you feel that doing your job gives you purpose? Does your job cause you stress? Do you have interests outside of your job? Do you have a family, and how do they feel about your impending retirement? For every person here who has said "go ahead and do it" there are others for whom retirement wasn't as good. I don't know how many times I have seen people retire and almost immediately begin a steady state of decline. both physically and mentally. The old "if you don't use it, you lose it" adage. I have a psychologist friend who has a sign over his desk that says "the purpose of life is a life of purpose."
Whatever you decide, enjoy your life each day as if it was your last. It could be! None of us are promised tommorrow. Take some time to smell the roses, ride the Dragon, etc. If you have accumulated vacation time, use it up and then come back and make your decision. That will give you some time to think about if you want it to be a permanent change.
Live long and prosper!
 

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Bruce, you've got some great comments here, especially the one about the tape measure. I retired @ 49 & just turned 62 & started drawing my S.S. last Sept..
I really enjoyed my job, & the folks i worked with. i was a "public servant" in a large metropolitan city & the job was an adrenaline rush @ times, but i was burnt out. i'd worked almost 22 yrs. for the city, had 3 years in the Army, had gone thru a divorce 2 years before, & wondered what i'd do if i did retire. Then i said "ANYTHING I WANT!"
Fortunately i could live comfortably as a single man on my retirement, but i needed something to do. So i decided to "work" part time @ occupations i thiught would be interesting. Here's what i've done since i retired.

Drove a dump truck, good pay, early hrs, didn't work weekends.

stopped that & went to work for a company that provided "role players" to various agencies in training acadamies. BIG TIME FUN, not a lotta $, but i kept busy.

after leaving that , i worked on a landscaping crew, hard work, o.k. $, GOOD EXCERSISE. trouble is they wanted me to be a crew supervisor. NO WAY

Last several years i drove a school bus. Good job, lotta fun, lotta time off, but i did not go back this year.
What am i doing now? Well i've re-married, my wife retired this past August. we have an RV & will Winter in Fl. & Texas, towing my Goldwing in a trailer to use as transpotation & travel once we're set up. Next Summmer & Fall we will work in Yosemite N.P. as volunteers. The N.P.S. will provide a full hookup site, incl. propane, in return for 20 hrs. of "work" a week.
My point to all this is, don't be afraid of "retirement". It's a big world "out there" & you can do anything you want, or nothing at all. IT'S GREAT!!!!!!!
the hobo
 

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Hobo
I like your idea on retirement. Get out there and do some of the things that you have been curious about during your working years. If they don't meet your expectations, just move on down the road. When you come out to Ca. to work in Yosemite Nat. Park, give me a holler. I live 75 mi. south of Yosemite and can show you some very interesting rides. I usually visit and ride through Yosemite 2-3 times a year.
Cheers!
 

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Retirement

I know the feeling full well; when I was given the opportunity for an enhanced retirement package after 34 years on the job, I was ready to jump at it. When the paperwork came to sign, I looked at it for a week before I took the plunge. I still have the pen I used to sign that document, pulling the plug on a good carreer. Now, five years later, I still have no regrets. We are getting ready to tow the wing to Florida for a 4 month vacation!!! What a life. :wink:
 

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Bruce, here's what I did. They offered me a package in my 37th year (53 yo) ((could have retired at 30 years))Even though I knew this is what I wanted, I was extremely nervous. Couldn't sleep, and thought I would miss my great job as a lineman for THE phone co.
So I decided to act like the first couple of weeks of retirement was extended vacation, so I would not be so stressed. But my toughest time was the 2 weeks before I actually retired. You know, thinking about not getting up at the same time every day, missing the guys at work, and being productive.
WELL have no fear , it is just the best thing in the world, you can rest if you want or clean the bike if you want or ride the bike if you want, or go for a ride if you want. You will find that the garage is even more special than before. What toys....
So have a ball and visit the guys if necessary but ride and clean and ride.
YOU WILL LOVE IT. Joy
 

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don't do it, hey someone had to have an alternate view. I'm 48 been working at the same place for 28 years. I have 5 weeks vacation that is 3 days more than I used this year now I have about 20 years to go till I retire so there is no chance of me getting bored or spending all my time sleeping. Keep working as long as they will let you. :D
 

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Eight years ago this month, my wife and I walked out on two really terrific careers. I was 52 and she was 50 (she is on my left in the picture). The three kids were out on their own.

There were no packages, down-sizing nor any outside pressure for us to go. My wife was sick of the politics that was involved with her job of Public Relations, and I was in love with my job as the bag man for the Corp. President.

She said she was going and she really wanted me to go with her. We could afford it, but I was concerned about loosing a major part of my identity. She won the argument by high lighting how I nearly worked 60 to 70 hours per week and didn't have time for skiing, sailing, fishing, crabbing, hunting, traveling, woodworking and my other hobbies. as well as having a tough time getting the time I needed to deal with some rental properties that we owned. Another push was that a firend, also 52, went sailing on a 35 footer with his wife and dropped dead on the deck in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay with no known health problems. I decided it was time.

Let me tell you of the three phases that I noted during the first few years:
Phase 1) Yippee ki A, I have time to fix everything that is broken and jump into those hobbies full throttle. (The first 9 months)

Phase 2) Who am I, and why am I happy doing menial work around the house and the other properties. The weeks were getting pretty long, too. Months 9 through 14)

Phase 3) Taking charge of my/our life using corporate skills. We made a Strategic Plan, where we painted a vision of what we wanted our life to be, what was important to us individually and separately. We found that most of my hobbies excluded her and her's bored me.

The outcome was to get back into motorcycles, a interest that we both had previously. Then we merged traveling and her historic/genealogy interests with motorcycling. We sold the rental properties so we were free, free at last. The plan was pretty thorough and resulted in us rearranging a number of things to fit our new lifestyle. We moved out of DC, we spend significant time with our kids and grandkids and review and renew our 5 year plan every year.

The reason I posted this is that most men won't discuss the down period of phase 2. Women don't seem to go through that phase, as they don't define themselves by what they do for a living.

Bottom line, it is a great way to live your life. I think the key is to manage it, manage your time, know your priorities, always have a list of things you want to do, and work at doing them.

Hope this helps.
 
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