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Test rode a friends over the weekend - was not at all what I imagined.
How ow long does it take to get used to it? Steering seemed hypersensitive and I guess you have to sit straight up cause I felt like I was on a greased pig.
 

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I didn't think there was that much of a difference between the two personally. You steer instead of leaning is the major difference. Maybe i am just too old to think about it.
 

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If you have been riding bikes for many years, it may take a little getting used to. Like BrokenBackJack mentioned, you now actually steer into turns instead of counter steering. It goes against what your muscle memory says and confuses you. Also not needing to lean on corners takes a little getting used to as well. The steering sensitivity is probably due to the raked front end and it doesnt take long to just use small inputs. The key is just to relax. If you constantly try to adjust steering and tighten up, you can have problems. It's best to just sit back and relax. As far as turns, I like to fully extend and lock the opposite arm for the direction of the turn. That helps reduce the fatigue you will probably get in your shoulders when riding the twisties.

I hope this helps...
 

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I took me about a week on a trip down the Natchez Trace Parkway and back home to east Tennessee to get used to the trike. I've been "trikeing" now for about 8 years and have no desire to go back to two wheels. I do gravel, ice and snow MUCH better, don't worry about tipping it over on a slick surface and have more luggage space. I still tilt a bit (not lean but tilt) in corners however. :)
 

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You do feel a lot more lateral Gs in curves because the trike does not lean. Also, because you have two wheels in back there is lateral movement over bumps. And, there is the steering, no more counter-steering and constant pressure is required to maintain a turn. The main adjustment I had to make was remembering not to try to put my foot down at stops.
Took me about 45 minutes of riding to get the hang of it.
The only thing I miss is leaning in curves, I was somewhat aggressive sometimes and really enjoyed mountain roads. But just going down the road, looking out over the bars, there is almost no difference. You're still out there in the wind, and I still enjoy the mountain roads.
 

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I've ridden a Trike since 2009 and I love it. However, I do miss the lean, and if I go back to two wheels someday, I would feel a little more comfortable being able to lean into turns using this conversion. Seen them in action but haven't had a chance to ride one.

www.tiltingmotorworks.com

It might be fun!!
 

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In Washington State, you have to get a 3-wheel endorsement which my wife and I earned from a weekend MSF course.

All I know is that the different 3-wheelers handle differently and I'd take a trike course if anyone is serious.

We learned a lot and I tested on a Ural sidecar and my wife on a Can Am Spyker. You can drift the back end on side-cared MCs and Spyders. Did it pissing off the instructor. But no Gold Wing trike conversions in the course.

Very nice riding.
 

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The tilting motor works bike conversion thing is crazy! I'm not a fan of the center fender looking thing but I am a fan of the engineering that guy put into those. Pretty cool.
 

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Yeah, the center fender piece they put on really detracts from the overall look of the Goldwing and the Harleys, plus I think they do a couple models of Indians too. I just like the fact you can still get the lean of 2 wheels but still have the stability of 3.

If you go for the full package on conversion it won't kick into the lean process until you hit 7mph, then it's on.
 

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Yeah, the center fender piece they put on really detracts from the overall look of the Goldwing and the Harleys, plus I think they do a couple models of Indians too. I just like the fact you can still get the lean of 2 wheels but still have the stability of 3.

If you go for the full package on conversion it won't kick into the lean process until you hit 7mph, then it's on.
You're both right. I literally live 10 miles from their Snohomish, WA shop. Just struggling with the idea that I have to bring an $8K donor Wing to then get a $16K conversion kit with "that" front fender. That fender should be reshaped and updated as its lines don't match the more modern look of the GL1800s:



Very well engineered but the rider interface is too complicated for newer rides. Still interested but with the newer gen 2015 or later Can Am Spyders, I get a more refined system. Took them several years to get the bugs out too.

Now this is a beautiful TMW Trio conversion and the fender lines match the bike - retro fender works here:


Great company - may go with them to support a Washington business.
 

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One thing I have learned is to push with the outside foot in a turn or curve.
Squeezing the tank with your knees helps too.
 

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It did take me a day to get used to it my self..........
A few years ago I went to Sturgis bike week and test rode a trike for the first time......I HATED IT!
But now that I have my own and had a few hours under my belt, I knew that I'll never go back to a two wheel'rrrrrr again.....

Ronnie
 

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It did take me a day to get used to it my self..........
A few years ago I went to Sturgis bike week and test rode a trike for the first time......I HATED IT!
But now that I have my own and had a few hours under my belt, I knew that I'll never go back to a two wheel'rrrrrr again.....

Ronnie
Hello Ronnie. It's been a while. I just got my 2006 GL1800 converted to a CSC trike. I'm getting used to it pretty quickly, but my wife on the back seat not so much. Says it makes her a bit nervous the way it handles compared to two wheels. Probably harder for the pillion passenger to adjust since they don't have the handlebars to brace themselves on in turns and such.

Bob
 

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Hello Ronnie. It's been a while. I just got my 2006 GL1800 converted to a CSC trike. I'm getting used to it pretty quickly, but my wife on the back seat not so much. Says it makes her a bit nervous the way it handles compared to two wheels. Probably harder for the pillion passenger to adjust since they don't have the handlebars to brace themselves on in turns and such.

Bob

Just out of curiosity, did your kit come with Ohatsu tires for the trike kit? How does it handle in the 60-70mph range? And do you feel like you have to slow down in curves and it seems like it may be leaning too much?

The reason I ask was the comment about your wife not feeling comfortable on it. When mine was converted to a CSC Viper, those were the tires it cam with. I would get random vibration in the 60-70mph range like the tires werent balanced right. And then when doing the twisties or even sweeping curves on the highway, especially going left, it felt like the trike wanted to tip over unless I slowed down. Turns out the Ohatsu tires were at fault. After contacting CSC, they authorized me to replace the tires locally and they would send me a check for the cost. I ended up having Goodyear Eagle tires installed by NTB. Those were a dramatic difference and the 60-70 shake was completely gone and it now felt planted all the way through curves. No more need to slow down.
 

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(y) I replaced the Ohatsu rear tires that came with my CSC kit after 1,000 miles. Noticeable improvement.
 
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