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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm brand new to GL1800 after purchasing my first Goldwing, a 2005 with 48,000 miles in Tampa, Florida. The seller had installed new tires on both the front and rear. The tires had less than 100 miles on them. The front is a Bridgestone BT45R 130/70-18 and the "dark side" rear is a Sunny SN3830 Snowmaster 195/55R16 filled to 36 psi). I live in Utah and flew down to Florida to pick up the cycle a month ago, then spent three weeks riding it back home 3,500 miles through sun, rain, sleet and even snow over the Rocky Mountains. The bike and tires performed perfectly.

Now that I'm home, I was giving the motorcycle a thorough inspection and was totally surprised to see the rear tire severely worn on just the left side. To me, the front tire looks even and I don't really see any wear on it. Hopefully the attached pictures are clear enough to show the wear. The rear tire looks ready to be replaced after just 3,500 miles.

Remember, I'm brand new to the Goldwing and wasn't sure what to expect. While I was riding, I noticed my head wasn't centered over the centerline of the bike. I was always several inches to the right. I experimented with shifting my weight to be over the centerline but it never felt comfortable. So the bike was probably leaning left the entire ride. I'm trying to understand the bad tire wear and the leaning. I don't know if the Goldwing has any tire angle adjustments like a car does.

I was towing a fully loaded Escapade trailer (again, performed flawlessly). I kept extra tools, security lock and cable, rain suit, and a heavy extension cord in the left side saddlebag. The right held a jacket, and a couple of cycle covers (bulky but light weight stuff). My saddlebags were not evenly loaded but I didn't think it would make any difference. I haven't ridden since the trip to see if unloading the saddlebags helped position me over the centerline of the cycle. The weather has been to unsettled to get out.

The two trailer tires are evenly worn on both tires.

Do you think my unbalanced saddlebags would cause this rear tire wear on the left side?
 

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......... I noticed my head wasn't centered over the centerline of the bike. I was always several inches to the right.....
........ I kept extra tools, security lock and cable, rain suit, and a heavy extension cord in the left side saddlebag...... My saddlebags were not evenly loaded but I didn't think it would make any difference......
Do you think my unbalanced saddlebags would cause this rear tire wear on the left side?.......
Heavy weight to the left, head and body moved to the right of vertical centerline to compensate......
Photographic evidence of tire wearing excessively on left of centerline........
Possible hitch position off center.......

I am not a scientist, but the evidence seems conclusive.
My final answer......yes to your question.
Jefro.
 

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I'm brand new to GL1800 after purchasing my first Goldwing, a 2005 with 48,000 miles in Tampa, Florida. The seller had installed new tires on both the front and rear. The tires had less than 100 miles on them. The front is a Bridgestone BT45R 130/70-18 and the "dark side" rear is a Sunny SN3830 Snowmaster 195/55R16 filled to 36 psi). I live in Utah and flew down to Florida to pick up the cycle a month ago, then spent three weeks riding it back home 3,500 miles through sun, rain, sleet and even snow over the Rocky Mountains. The bike and tires performed perfectly.

Now that I'm home, I was giving the motorcycle a thorough inspection and was totally surprised to see the rear tire severely worn on just the left side. To me, the front tire looks even and I don't really see any wear on it. Hopefully the attached pictures are clear enough to show the wear. The rear tire looks ready to be replaced after just 3,500 miles.

Remember, I'm brand new to the Goldwing and wasn't sure what to expect. While I was riding, I noticed my head wasn't centered over the centerline of the bike. I was always several inches to the right. I experimented with shifting my weight to be over the centerline but it never felt comfortable. So the bike was probably leaning left the entire ride. I'm trying to understand the bad tire wear and the leaning. I don't know if the Goldwing has any tire angle adjustments like a car does.

I was towing a fully loaded Escapade trailer (again, performed flawlessly). I kept extra tools, security lock and cable, rain suit, and a heavy extension cord in the left side saddlebag. The right held a jacket, and a couple of cycle covers (bulky but light weight stuff). My saddlebags were not evenly loaded but I didn't think it would make any difference. I haven't ridden since the trip to see if unloading the saddlebags helped position me over the centerline of the cycle. The weather has been to unsettled to get out.

The two trailer tires are evenly worn on both tires.

Do you think my unbalanced saddlebags would cause this rear tire wear on the left side?
Weird! :popcorn:
 

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Hopefully, not frame damage?
 

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I'm brand new to GL1800 after purchasing my first Goldwing, a 2005 with 48,000 miles in Tampa, Florida. The seller had installed new tires on both the front and rear. The tires had less than 100 miles on them. The front is a Bridgestone BT45R 130/70-18 and the "dark side" rear is a Sunny SN3830 Snowmaster 195/55R16 filled to 36 psi). I live in Utah and flew down to Florida to pick up the cycle a month ago, then spent three weeks riding it back home 3,500 miles through sun, rain, sleet and even snow over the Rocky Mountains. The bike and tires performed perfectly.

Now that I'm home, I was giving the motorcycle a thorough inspection and was totally surprised to see the rear tire severely worn on just the left side. To me, the front tire looks even and I don't really see any wear on it. Hopefully the attached pictures are clear enough to show the wear. The rear tire looks ready to be replaced after just 3,500 miles.

Remember, I'm brand new to the Goldwing and wasn't sure what to expect. While I was riding, I noticed my head wasn't centered over the centerline of the bike. I was always several inches to the right. I experimented with shifting my weight to be over the centerline but it never felt comfortable. So the bike was probably leaning left the entire ride. I'm trying to understand the bad tire wear and the leaning. I don't know if the Goldwing has any tire angle adjustments like a car does.

I was towing a fully loaded Escapade trailer (again, performed flawlessly). I kept extra tools, security lock and cable, rain suit, and a heavy extension cord in the left side saddlebag. The right held a jacket, and a couple of cycle covers (bulky but light weight stuff). My saddlebags were not evenly loaded but I didn't think it would make any difference. I haven't ridden since the trip to see if unloading the saddlebags helped position me over the centerline of the cycle. The weather has been to unsettled to get out.

The two trailer tires are evenly worn on both tires.

Do you think my unbalanced saddlebags would cause this rear tire wear on the left side?

Too many left turns on the way home or huge side winds,:wink2:
Welcome to the forum.:grin2:
 

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I have followed several Wing riders over the years with the exact same riding position: off-center to the right or left by several inches. They all had the same issue with uneven wear. I am pretty sure you have answered your own question, but I am puzzled that you did not feel comfortable when centered on the bike.
 

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--

Several possible causes have been mentioned. One I found affected me some years ago was my body not being centered on the bike. Our bodies are not balanced even side to side (think size of your arms, stomach, etc.) and will naturally sit uneven on any chair. You have to either measure with your hands from the sides of your hips to the sides of the seat to know that. Or to see where you are in relation to being vertical in the center is to look down and note if you have the same amount of engine guard or motor projection on both sides of the gas tank.

One more thing. I found that I have a tendency to ride with my left leg flared out to the left while my right leg is along the gas tank. When I pull the left one in, my bike straightens up as the wind drag is eliminated. This is most notable if you try riding without hands on the grips. Then your bike will have its way. It's hard to stop a habit you've been doing for years though. It's even more pronounced on a bike without fairing.

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Would replace it with a better run flat tire and keep a watch on tread wear. Run Flat tires like Bridgestone Driveguard, Yokohama Avid Envigor ZPS, or Pirelli Cinturato P1 Run Flat
https://www.tirerack.com/tires/Tire...6&rearWidth=255/&rearRatio=40&rearDiameter=17
I have never seen a rear, or front, MC tire wear that unevenly. Agree, I too, would start with a brand name, run flat CT, and see how it wears. I have never heard of a Sunny brand tire. Is it made in China?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The rain here stopped so I took the bike out on a ride with the saddlebags empty. The bike rode straighter up. My body was still to the right, just not as much. I think I've got two problems to deal with: saddlebag balance and my bad riding posture. I'll try reloading my bags with extra weight on the right side and see if that compensates for my body weight.

Does that make sense? Could this really cause this much wear in 3,500 miles?

I definitely will need a new tire. I'll check it this forum and buy one that's recommended.

Thanks for helping me with this.
 

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I can think of three reasons for that much wear, but just my opinions. One, as has been stated, balance the load and riding position. Two, a very long trip in warming temps with a full load. May not be super heavy, but take loaded bags and the additional weight of a trailer, and you still have a load. Third, it's a no name Winter tire. Softer tire compound combined with the other two concerns, she's gonna wear. As was suggested above, get a name brand run flat on that rear and I think you'll see a huge difference in performance and wear. I put a Pirelli P1 RF on mine and immediately went on an 1800 mile trip. The bike was well loaded, and today with almost 4,000 miles on it, the tire still looks new. Good luck, ride safe, and congrats on your new pony.
 
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Guys.. this is often seen because we travel twice the distance for left hand turns than right.

There is an in-depth article on it on...

Rattlebars.com
 

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I have seen this same thing happen on a friend of mines bike. His was a 2008 model and he never fixed it. At first I thought it was because he was getting on the throttle really hard when he cornered going left. He assured me he was not. I don't think the loading of the saddlebags would cause this at all especially on a long trip with mainly straight line ridding. I have grossly over loaded one side of my bags before and could not feel much difference. When he traded his bike in it was still doing it. I tried to get him to check and retorque the swing arm bearings but he never did that either. If I had to hazard a guess on this one. I would say either the frame is not true or the swing arm slightly points to the right a little and is dragging the left side on the tire. Kinda like the toe being out on a car. Just a WAG though. BTW my friend bought his bike new and was the only owner. He replaced the first tire with less than 5k on it and it looked like yours except it was a MC tire. Good luck with it.
 

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Took awhile to find it online but, yes, the Sunny is made in China. So anything is possible, including one side may be a larger radius than the other. Also, most reviews on the Sunny are terrible. If staying dark side, I highly recommend the next CT to be a run flat.
 
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Be sure there is NO obstruction in the wheel well when the rear spring is totally compressed. I’ve seen this before (but not on a GW) and at high speed a dip can grind the rubber right off the tire. Noted you have a hitch. Maybe remove the rear tire and shine a bright light and inspect for a wear pattern on something. Having said this, I’m leaning toward Capt. Bob’s analysis.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for all the help. I'm getting a new Bridgestone Run Flat tire installed this afternoon.

While I have the bike on its side to change the tire and "spin" the wheel, it only turns a time or two before stopping and I can hear activity in the gears (not grinding). I assume this is just the effect of the drive mechanism. Should it spin more than that?
 

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Two factors that are inherent in all non-UK riding situations are longer left turns (already mentioned) and roadway crown. Coupled with inferior tire materials/construction and asymmetric load distribution I can see how this wear pattern may have occurred. Hope the new Bridgestone wears evenly!
 

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Thanks for all the help. I'm getting a new Bridgestone Run Flat tire installed this afternoon.

While I have the bike on its side to change the tire and "spin" the wheel, it only turns a time or two before stopping and I can hear activity in the gears (not grinding). I assume this is just the effect of the drive mechanism. Should it spin more than that?

Driveguard RF is a good tire, start with 32 PSI and go down to 28-30 PSI. What ever feels good to you.
I liked mine at 30 PSI, easy to remember too.:wink2:
What color is your wing? Is it a ABS or Std. brake model Might see you around.>:)
My SWAG is junk tire, the cords were probably bad from a tire mounting gone wrong. :smile2:
 

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One thing not mentioned was the rear trailing arm bushings. If one side is worn more than the other or worn out completely, then the trailing arm may be out of align with the bike and frame and cause excessive wear.
 
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