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(actually 191,818 miles on a 2003 Wing).

So, valve check (good), spark plugs (last changes @74,960 mi-11/10/09, nice tan color but gap increased from 1.1 mm to 1.5 mm), cleaned front calipers and new front brake pads (wasn't quite ready but what the ****, I'm down there), coolant flush (last @140,066 mi-7/6/13), installed speed-bleeders (fantastic!) and flushed the brakes and clutch (last @140,066-7/6/13), the dreaded air filter was replaced (last changed 154,903 mi 4/24/14), removed failed aftermarket heated hand grips. Cleaned up aftermarket wiring (2 GPS's, XM radio and Garmin heated gear outlet). Lubed clutch and front brake handle bushings. I did a general cleaning of all hard to reach places as I put it back together. Rear pads to be replaced when I put on a new rear tire.

Oil and rear fluids done @ 189,908 mi (Full synthetic (Rotella) every 5K mi and Mobil 1 synthetic gear oil every 10K mi). Forks done @154,903-4/24/14.

Now, for my question............is there any maintenance for the throttle cables? If so, how's it done? They seem stiff but that may be because i've been jumping back and forth between a 2018 Kawasaki Z900RS which may have an weaker cable spring.

Also, anything else I need to do?
 

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I lube my cables at least every season. Makes it much smoother and easier to operate. I use Tri-flo lubricant in a small bottle. Comes with a small tube which can be used to drip the lube into the cables. Loosen the locknut holding the throttle cable bracket, pull the cable out enough to be able to drip lube in, replace. Be careful not to remove the cables from the throttle housing and then push/pull them a lot. It will disconnect the cable from the throttle body housing, and then you get the pleasure of basically doing an air cleaner job to get it all right again. Don't ask me how I know...

QUOTE=rhjiii46;5592479](actually 191,818 miles on a 2003 Wing).

So, valve check (good), spark plugs (last changes @74,960 mi-11/10/09, nice tan color but gap increased from 1.1 mm to 1.5 mm), cleaned front calipers and new front brake pads (wasn't quite ready but what the ****, I'm down there), coolant flush (last @140,066 mi-7/6/13), installed speed-bleeders (fantastic!) and flushed the brakes and clutch (last @140,066-7/6/13), the dreaded air filter was replaced (last changed 154,903 mi 4/24/14), removed failed aftermarket heated hand grips. Cleaned up aftermarket wiring (2 GPS's, XM radio and Garmin heated gear outlet). Lubed clutch and front brake handle bushings. I did a general cleaning of all hard to reach places as I put it back together. Rear pads to be replaced when I put on a new rear tire.

Oil and rear fluids done @ 189,908 mi (Full synthetic (Rotella) every 5K mi and Mobil 1 synthetic gear oil every 10K mi). Forks done @154,903-4/24/14.

Now, for my question............is there any maintenance for the throttle cables? If so, how's it done? They seem stiff but that may be because i've been jumping back and forth between a 2018 Kawasaki Z900RS which may have an weaker cable spring.

Also, anything else I need to do?[/QUOTE]
 

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Next time you change the air filter, put some light spray lube on the throttle return springs and mechanism on the throttle body. If the cables aren't operating smoothly, it may be smarter to just replace them since they have so many miles on them. It isn't a job for the faint hearted though, as it takes quite a bit of disassembly to do.
 

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(actually 191,818 miles on a 2003 Wing).

So, valve check (good), spark plugs (last changes @74,960 mi-11/10/09, nice tan color but gap increased from 1.1 mm to 1.5 mm), cleaned front calipers and new front brake pads (wasn't quite ready but what the ****, I'm down there), coolant flush (last @140,066 mi-7/6/13), installed speed-bleeders (fantastic!) and flushed the brakes and clutch (last @140,066-7/6/13), the dreaded air filter was replaced (last changed 154,903 mi 4/24/14), removed failed aftermarket heated hand grips. Cleaned up aftermarket wiring (2 GPS's, XM radio and Garmin heated gear outlet). Lubed clutch and front brake handle bushings. I did a general cleaning of all hard to reach places as I put it back together. Rear pads to be replaced when I put on a new rear tire.

Oil and rear fluids done @ 189,908 mi (Full synthetic (Rotella) every 5K mi and Mobil 1 synthetic gear oil every 10K mi). Forks done @154,903-4/24/14.

Now, for my question............is there any maintenance for the throttle cables? If so, how's it done? They seem stiff but that may be because i've been jumping back and forth between a 2018 Kawasaki Z900RS which may have an weaker cable spring.

Also, anything else I need to do?

Yeah. Change your spark plugs more often. :)
 

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Yeah. Change your spark plugs more often. :)

Agreed. You don't change because it will run bad with worn plugs because it really won't. However, the larger gap puts more stress on the coils and a set of coils is over $300. Plus...when the coils go out, it will miss and run erratically and can cause you to almost drop it on low speed corners when it misses so it's a bit of a safety issue to have the coils failing.
 

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Yes lube the spring that Fred mentioned, also lay the bike on its left side so you can flush out old crap from under the throttle body. The original throttle cables are still working fine on my wing with 531,000 miles.
 

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Now, for my question............is there any maintenance for the throttle cables? If so, how's it done? They seem stiff but that may be because i've been jumping back and forth between a 2018 Kawasaki Z900RS which may have an weaker cable spring.

Also, anything else I need to do?
Yes ... on 5th gens throttle operation needs inspected every 8,000 miles. Here is how I check them. Turn the handle bars full left, open and let go of the throttle. What I listen for is the snapping closed. Do the same in center and full right.

Then check for excessive throttle play in those 3 positions. One of those 3 positions will have less throttle play ... getting out the "less" is the target. Unless the Wing will be rode in a cold climate, I adjust the throttle cable till there is little play in its tightest (less) of those 3 positions. To do that, center stand the Wing, start it, and allow it to get to operating position. Then while making the adjustment, move the bar fully to the target side. I like just a little bit of play. Under no circumstances should the rpms increase when moving the bars back and forth to full lock positions.

If you don't have "snapping closed" in the above 3 positions, let me know and I'll write back and share what to look for, and how to correct it. In the mean time ... never, ever lube throttle linkage. It will then collect dust.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Agreed. You don't change because it will run bad with worn plugs because it really won't. However, the larger gap puts more stress on the coils and a set of coils is over $300. Plus...when the coils go out, it will miss and run erratically and can cause you to almost drop it on low speed corners when it misses so it's a bit of a safety issue to have the coils failing.
I appreciate the reasons behind the advice, this makes sense of it all. The bike did run great and still got good gas mileage so I couldn't see that any harm could have been done but the info re: he coils makes sense. Thanks 2WheelNut.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Next time you change the air filter, put some light spray lube on the throttle return springs and mechanism on the throttle body. If the cables aren't operating smoothly, it may be smarter to just replace them since they have so many miles on them. It isn't a job for the faint hearted though, as it takes quite a bit of disassembly to do.
Hi Fred, (I met you at Rockies Gold a few years ago, are you going this year?) I've just installed a new air filter but have only buttoned up the electronics and haven't put the shelter on yet, so.....today I'm going back in and lube the throttle return springs and mechanism. I presume it's just under the air box, right? So, the consensuses is to lube the throttle body but don't lube the cables themselves?
 

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I presume it's just under the air box, right? So, the consensuses is to lube the throttle body but don't lube the cables themselves?
It is OK to lube the throttle cables, but there is no need to do that unless the cables are causing the throttle to not snap back. Also, there can be many reason why a throttle do not snap back ... throttle grip rubbing on kill switch assembly, risers causing the cable to become "short", aftermarket steering stems, incorrect cable routing, the throttle grip itself needing lubed, covers and brackets missing ... etc. A proper service starts with a proper inspection.
 

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Hi Fred, (I met you at Rockies Gold a few years ago, are you going this year?) I've just installed a new air filter but have only buttoned up the electronics and haven't put the shelter on yet, so.....today I'm going back in and lube the throttle return springs and mechanism. I presume it's just under the air box, right? So, the consensuses is to lube the throttle body but don't lube the cables themselves?

If you're having a problem with them, then I would lube both, but Greg does bring up a good point, lubricant can and will attract dirt, so it is important that if you lube the throttle return springs that you choose the right lubricant, the lighter the better. I like to use a dry spray lube on them, as this doesn't leave any oily residue that will hold dirt.


I also have seen instances where the wrong lubricant used on cables later turns to a sticky residue after exposure to heat and time and actually makes the cables stick, so you need to be careful what you use on them. Many throttle cables are now lined with a teflon sleeve and as such should work fine with no lubricant for the life of the cable. Some manufactures now even tell you not to lubricate them, and there are different schools of thought on this. I generally do not lubricate throttle cables on the GoldWing because I just don't see them binding or sticking. But if I did, I would use a dry slide type lube as shown below. I do frequently give the throttle return springs a dose of dry slide spray lube, as it helps the throttle to snap back when released better. You can put a straw on the spray can to reach them on the left side of the airbox.
 

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Another thing worth mentioning here is throttle cable routing, and I think Greg also touched on that. When I see throttle cables binding on a Gold Wing, it is usually because the owner has installed aftermarket risers of some sort on the handlebars that are stressing the cables, and the cables are no longer routed in the clip on the right handlebar stalk because the handlebar position won't allow it. Many times a binding throttle cable can be resolved by adjusting the routing of the cables a bit, so pay attention to that. Also, removing the throttle from the bar and cleaning the bar and inside of the throttle cable will also go a long way toward getting rid of resistance in the throttle. A little dry slide type lube on the bar before reassembly will also help.
 

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Has the driveshaft ever been replaced ? my first one lasted 200,000 miles, the second driveshaft lasted 250,000 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Another thing worth mentioning here is throttle cable routing, and I think Greg also touched on that. When I see throttle cables binding on a Gold Wing, it is usually because the owner has installed aftermarket risers of some sort on the handlebars that are stressing the cables, and the cables are no longer routed in the clip on the right handlebar stalk because the handlebar position won't allow it. Many times a binding throttle cable can be resolved by adjusting the routing of the cables a bit, so pay attention to that. Also, removing the throttle from the bar and cleaning the bar and inside of the throttle cable will also go a long way toward getting rid of resistance in the throttle. A little dry slide type lube on the bar before reassembly will also help.
Should be no problem there, all stock, never been modified.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Has the driveshaft ever been replaced ? my first one lasted 200,000 miles, the second driveshaft lasted 250,000 miles.
Still original components. I do have trike take-offs waiting. How about your rear end (I mean the bikes!) no problem there with 450,000+ miles? I had to put a rear end in a 2004 with only 60,000 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Omg

Please tell me I don't have to pull the gas tank to get to the throttle bodies (or am I reading the manual wrong!)
 
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