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Discussion Starter #1
I have done some research on the board and still need clarification. The bike is a 2013.

The ACC 5A fuse provides power to both the Accessory terminals at the battery AND the aux power plug at the front left pocket?

On earlier models it seems the front pocket power was coming from somewhere else.

Thanks,
Andy
 

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Nope.........as far as I know that fuse has always been in the accessory power outlet circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
So you've got 5a total between the accessory terminals at the battery AND the aux power at the front left pocket?


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So you've got 5a total between the accessory terminals at the battery AND the aux power at the front left pocket?


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'01 thru '05 the accessory screw ONLY was fused at 5 amps and the pocket and all other accessory outlets were part of the accessory fuse. '06 and above were fused at the screw and all accessory plugs through the 5 amp fuse.
 

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I have done some research on the board and still need clarification. The bike is a 2013.

The ACC 5A fuse provides power to both the Accessory terminals at the battery AND the aux power plug at the front left pocket?

On earlier models it seems the front pocket power was coming from somewhere else.

Thanks,
Andy
The front pocket power was always tapped off of the accessory relay. Honda made a big mistake with the original design and did not protect the pocket connector with its own dedicated fuse. Some short sighted engineer put the 5 amp fuse in the OEM cigarette lighter socket, and it never dawned on him that owners were going to hook up all sorts of other accessories other than the Honda accessory to that connector, leaving it unprotected. (It happens) In 2004, Honda realized the mistake and rerouted the pocket wiring through the fuse block and the 5 amp terminal fuse. It is still powered by the accessory relay.

This sequence of events is of course just a theory, but it fits.

The line was always protected by the accessory fuse, which is 15 amps if I remember correctly. But if you overloaded the accessory line on the early bikes, you would blow the main accessory fuse and lose some important functions, such as the instrument cluster. Keep in mind that the accessory fuse also has to handle the power from the right hand connector for the heated grips add on accessory.

The accessory connections were never designed to power heavy loads, such as compressors or heated gear. They are there for things like cell phones and mp3 players. High current devices should always get their power directly from the battery, not through the bike's electrical system.

The nice thing about the accessory terminals is that it is a great place to tap into for a relay trigger line in order to install switched high power devices.
 
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