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Get the manual. Any time manual is offered vs automatic, the manual will always win in reliability over the long run. I go to Walmart and once in a while use the restroom, and they have those automatic flush toilets. That saves me the horrible work of pulling down a flush lever, but trouble is they never work correctly. Same idea applies to the DCT.
Is that to say the DCT doesn't actually work?
I intend to buy an extended service plan for my DCT, just for that eventuality then.
 

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I have been riding for 50 years, including Goldwing & Harley Touring. I purchased a 2018 DCT Touring 2 years ago and I am amazed at how this bike rides, shifts & handles. I have never ridden anything else that compares with it. The DCT is amazing, it seems to shift just when you are thinking you would shift if was manual, I believe it might learn your driving style and make the bike shift at the right time for you. You will not be disappointed with the DCT model. I hope you enjoy the Goldwing when it arrives....!
 

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Perhaps I am rationalizing my decision but to me clutch and shift IS part of the motorcycle experience that differentiates between active involvement and riding in a car. I never felt clutch and shifting was a chore. I thought clutch and shifting IS motorcycling. I am not sure, other than fascination with technology, why I would want that taken away.

I have one car that's automatic and one that is manual. Guess which one I want to drive recreationally.
That’s the problem.

Most people only have experience with an automatic transmission in a car and then transfer that known experience to an unknown because Honda’s DCT in motorcycles isn’t anything like a torque converter automatic common to cars and light trucks.

To Honda’s credit they have offered the choice of a transmission in each DCT optioned motorcycle for 10 years so those that prefer a fully manual transmission can have one and those that prefer the benefits of DCT can have them as well.
 

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I’m so used to manual I’m having a hard time wrapping my head around the DCT.
I almost never take my bike out of gear at a stop. Does the DCT do this?
Also if you were to rev the engine at all would it suddenly take off?
Not trying to hijack the post but perhaps the poster wonders some of the things I do about the DCT.
Hey Motor3, I'm by no means an expert, but I've had my DCT for over a month so I can at least answer a bit. The bike stays in gear when you stop, but you can take your hand off the throttle. Think of it like taking your foot off the gas pedal of an automatic car at a stop sign. If you rev your engine, the same thing will happen as if you did that in a stopped-in-gear car: It's going to launch like a rocket.
It took almost no time to get used to the DCT. It all boils down to personal choice, and after thousands and thousands of miles on a "normal" motorcycle, I can honestly say that the DCT Wing has won my heart. Of course I had heard about them before heading into the dealership, but I had never test driven one. My first ever experience on a DCT was after I had signed the paperwork. I was lucky, you might not be. Take a test drive and check it out!
Edit: yeah I had a brain fart. It isn't like an automatic car at a stop sign; as noted below, a car will roll forward. Not so with the DCT. Instead, think of it as a motorcycle that doesn't move forward just because it's in gear. :D
 

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I’m so used to manual I’m having a hard time wrapping my head around the DCT.
I almost never take my bike out of gear at a stop. Does the DCT do this?
Also if you were to rev the engine at all would it suddenly take off?
Not trying to hijack the post but perhaps the poster wonders some of the things I do about the DCT.
Don't think of the DCT like an automatic. It is an automatically shifting manual transmission. In a car with automatic if you take your foot off the brake it will start to move because of the torque converter. The DCT has a clutch similar to a manual bike. When sitting still the clutch is disengaged. You can release brake and throttle and it will sit there just like a manual with the clutch pulled.

It will definitely take off just like your car will if you rev it in gear. No playing Harley at the stop lights if still in gear.
 

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Been riding DCT for 18 months, including many rides with the wife. Shift induced headbuts from the rear with DCT = 0. So fast and smooth, and the rear of the bike does not rise and fall with each shift like a conventional setup. Honda used to have a comparison video on U Tube showing this on 2 bikes on rollers (dyno). Awesome transmission on an awesome bike.
 

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I’m so used to manual I’m having a hard time wrapping my head around the DCT.
I almost never take my bike out of gear at a stop. Does the DCT do this?
Also if you were to rev the engine at all would it suddenly take off?
Not trying to hijack the post but perhaps the poster wonders some of the things I do about the DCT.
DCT does NOT have a torque converter like an automatic transmission car.

DCT has TWO clutches (hence the name)
Essentially 2 transmissions.
One clutch/transmission deals with gears 1, 3, 5, 7.
The other does 2, 4, 6,
The computer manages the gear selection AND the clutch operation. The more I ride it the more impressed I am with it's decision making.

It will 'predict' what gear you will be needing next,
For example, you are in 3rd gear and holding the throttle wide open and the rpm is high. It will predict that the next required gear is 4th, and will shift the 2, 4, 6 transmission to that gear. When it decides that shift rpm has been reached, it will disengage the active clutch and engage the 2, 4, 6 clutch -- in much less time than we can roll back the throttle, pull in a manual clutch, shift the trans, release the manual clutch, roll throttle back on.

It 's equally smart in downshift situations.
If you are using the brakes, it will downshift to supply engine braking.
It will do this more aggressively under braking than under a roll-off throttle and coast situation.

And so on...
 

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Discussion Starter #29
A Big THANK YOU to all of the riders who responded to my question. I think you've made me click over to the DCT side. My bike will be in March something as it will ship on the 9th. Some dealers have this already. I hope mine will get one soon enough but not too soon as the snow is still falling here in Illinois. Why? I have no idea because that Punxsutawney guy said we should be out of winter by now. Or that's what I heard him say.

I've ridden Honda DCT and manual back to back on the NC700X model when first out.
The most startling experience for me was test riding a new Zero FX last summer in a big city.
The electric has one speed, GO! No clutch lever, no clutch shifter and at the first stop sign I almost paniced.
After a few blocks I was loving the single handed throttle only but mostly the peace and quiet.

I've been rather repulsed by my Harley dealer parts guys bragging to me about the new Neighbor Hater exhaust.
There's a few newer Road and Street Glides on the floor with these on them. The salesmen want to roll them outside and fire them up almost to entice me to buy them.
The older I get the quieter I want my life.
I've saved my hearing through 45 years of wood, metals and plastic shop work in our company and choose to wear ear plugs with a full face helmet.
I traded off a very nice Harley Low Rider with Python 3's and a newer DR650 for this up coming to me 2020 Wing.
Even the 2018 used Wing I test rode last fall had "too loud" exhaust and it was stock.
I'm becoming more sensitive to this I guess which means the day is coming when my short range commute bike (a new 2020 DR650 Suzuki Dual Sport) will be sold off and a new Zero will take its place. Maybe real soon.

As for resale value you all should know that I'm famous locally for needing an intervention with my motorcycle buying habits. Last year, 6 new bikes were purchased. I ended up with 3 in my garage last fall going into Winter which is pretty common. This year I hope to keep it to just one new bike.
As for the intervention it has become so bad in recent years that my friends say just go to Ken's house to see the new models because the dealer ain't got them on the floor.
What's funny is I got into riding late in life, age 45 and at 59 now am still trying out all the brands and styles of riding.
Triumph and Ducati are still on my list plus a KTM.

As for resell I may be wanting to sell the Wing in a year so I do think about that.

The most miles ever on a single bike? 17,000 on the High Ball Victory with Ape Hangers and that bike was amazing.
They had Harley beat for a few years for sure.
Indian doesn't impress me but they are outstanding bikes I know. Just not for me.
I've lost the "Cruiser" appeal. Seating is hard on my back and spine. Standard position for me from now on.
This is what caused me to full circle back to the Wing.
I had a 1500 for a bit and can appreciate the bike, model and the fact it's a Honda.
I've had a number of Hondas. Always seem real smooth.

I test rode the 2018 last fall and it was a manual.

I shift smoothly and enjoy slow speed maneuvering in a parking lot. I practice this a lot.
Two years ago I worked for the MSF training in our state for a college as I like to see people get some
good education and skills knowledge before launching into the street riding.

On my Victory Highball I rode from Champaign, IL to the Tail of the Dragon twice. Never thought I'd ride that bike
further than 25 miles but after you get used to it you really can enjoy ape's.

I think a smoother shifting would allow my wife a bit more pleasure but you should know she is a really not a good
passenger. She is fine most of the time but doesn't like to wear a helmet, doesn't like her hair messed up, doesn't like the wind in her eyes, doesn't like the wind in her hair, etc. etc. She gets car sick even on a bike and then takes children's Dramamine which still causes her to get drowsy.
So, basically I just tell her I'm not into having any passenger and she says that's perfect. LOL
She will ride a bit and maybe fly to a destination, get on my bike and ride to sight-see, I hope this summer.
At least we will try this. For me when taking a truck or car for long distance touring it's me and the radio because she falls asleep with the Dramamine and snoozes and I'm by myself. Not all that fun when you're trying to see nice terrain. But at least she's not sick and we don't have to fly. I'm going to try the best of both worlds, I'll ride out west and she'll fly and meet me. We'll take the bike around or rent a car if need be and she will fly home and I'll ride back.
This way I get to see Nebraska and mark that state off my list this year along with North Dakota and see the badlands again on the way and hopefully with her along with Rushmore and Crazy Horse for her sake, I've been before. She wants to see the west and it's always best from the view on a motorcycle in my opinion. I'm working guys to get my wife off the sofa and into the world while I have time.
If my wrists can hold up with out surgery and I think the DCT will help and I know the heated grips along with the cruise control certainly will, had those on my BMW's, I'll be much better off than I am now and no typing or CAD design in my office when I'm on my bike. When in 2015 my son and I traveled to Sturgis and the great west tour for a month to California and back on new Harley softails I never felt better.
 

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I just turned 70, been riding since I was 14 and now the hands and wrists, etc are not as healthy and hurt more from arthritis or whatever. I have an '18 Tour DCT and not having to work the clutch is something I like not doing. I am used to the DCT and since I ride 90% in the mountains of NE GA, (sucks to live here, hahaha) I can shift with the paddle if I want to downshift before entering corners or whenever, even in Auto Mode. I also have an '05 HD Electra Glide and working the clutch isn't fun anymore. I love the bike, have had it 15 years but we get on the Wing a lot more often and we ride two up 95% of the time. Go for a good test ride and see for yourself. I demoed a manual Wing before buying the DCT. The 6 speed manual is a nice transmission, but you have to decide for yourself.
 

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When taking MSF riding classes, I found that not having a clutch lever to fan when doing slow maneuvers, made the task different. I was able to do all the required tasks, but had to think about it differently than I had when using a standard transmission. The DCT always did the right thing, but it sure was different. I LOVE how slow speed maneuvers work on the wing! It's just remarkably stable.
 

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I am in the “riding for over 50 years crowd” and always manual for all the reasons many wrote about. I still enjoy manual on my second bike (KTM 1290) but I bought DCT on my Tour and have no regrets. My wife rides pillion and it is a bit smoother on occasions. I got over ghost shifting in about 10 minutes and it just works extremely well for me. I absolutely figured I would never have an automatic transmission bike. Seriously. What next? A moped? Since dealer had both I took one out just to see how it was with every intention if getting manual. I’ve had no regrets for. Now that I have it I would get it just for the walk mode. Having owned several heavy bikes and now being in my 70’s I have struggles with maneuvering a bike in and out of tight spots, some on uneven grades. Backing up an incline? Forget about it! Swallow your pride and just get assistance. With the walk mode it is no problem. Kind of fun backing up an incline and seeing expressions of bikers whom assume you’re doing under your own power.
I do suspect there will be potential for increased maintenance but not concerned as I’ve had plenty of autosin vehicles that are high mileage with no servicing other than changing fluids.
 

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That is the color!

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
Would you mind telling me what state you live in? I live in Kentucky, and I can't find any Honda Dealers here in Kentucky or Indiana that have any of the 2020 Gold Wings.
Extremely jealous in Kentucky!!
 

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Would you mind telling me what state you live in? I live in Kentucky, and I can't find any Honda Dealers here in Kentucky or Indiana that have any of the 2020 Gold Wings.
Extremely jealous in Kentucky!!
Nevada

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
 

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Well, I had on order a new bagger Wing black metallic 2020 manual but the dealer tells me they are shipping him a DCT version first.

He said I'm able to take this DCT out and ride it and I may decide I like it better.

What I'm thinking is I'll just go with the DCT.
One other dealer in the South Carolina area told me he sells 10:1 ratio of DCT to manual. He won't even order a manual for the show room.
That surprised me.
I'm thinking resell on a DCT is going to be better than a manual as more guys will want it as we move forward and it becomes mainstream.

Plus, two big things for me is the wife won't ride with me much but if the smoother shifting of a DCT transmission is going to make it more comfortable
for her than the standard I'm all for it and the second and main reason is that ever since I had Victory Highball with ape hangers I've had numbness
and other issues with my hands and fingers. I know it's not just from riding but the cold weather doesn't help and all the computer keyboarding and CAD drafting doesn't either. So, since I'm still working and need my hands and fingers perhaps I need to go DCT and take some stress off from the clutch lever and having to
be on point to shift with that left hand. I don't want to give up riding and I still have my Suzuki DR650 dual sport when I want to get into some clutch work and riding standing up on my pegs.

Thoughts from you riders on the DCT for making life better for aged hands, wrists and fingers?
I'm seeing my chiropractor for the numbness and tingling and it's really helping. If giving me many more years of comfort riding with cruise control, heated grips
and an automatic tranny will help I should do this.
Have a CTX750DCT with over 30k and it has been totally dependable and easy to get used to. Just picked up a 2018 Goldwing Tour DCT from Sport Cycles and am pretty sure you would not be disappointed with it. Just a great bike and have had many. They were also great to deal with. The bike itself with the DCT selections to choose from make it like four bikes as they are all a definite change. Tour, Sport, Eco and Rain. Just a fantastic bike and worth getting the Tour with the options that it comes with makes it worth the jump up. Good Luck and ride safe.
 

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I had an '18 6 spd that had a problem Honda couldn't figure out. Put 13k on it. So they made me a hell'va deal on a 2019 & I went with the DCT this time. After 200 miles I was questioning my choice. After 500 miles I was o.k. with it. After 1k I was sold. Once you ride it and play with the up & down shift controls, etc it all seems like 2nd nature now. Don't think I'll ever go back at this point.
 

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Have a '18 DCT that was purchased as a trike last April. Most of the time upshifts in gears 2 thru 7 are very smooth but downshifts leave a lot to be desired. I use the manual paddle shifters most of the time to smooth the downshifts out. The bigger problem is if i pull away from a stop slowly (no more that 2500) rpm the bike will upshift to 2nd gear. If i drive it in a more spirited fashion and exceed 2500 rpm the bike fails to shift and will go all the way to the engine redline unless i close the throttle.
When it fails to upshift on its own in 1st gear i have tried to force it to upshift using the paddle shifter but still will not upshift. Sport mode is totally unusable (extremely clunky shifting and will not upshift at less than 5500 rpm in any of the 3 lower gears). Have not tried it in upper 4 gears at all. Finally gave up yesterday and trailered it to Honda/Russellville for them to evaluate and hopefully get if fixed.
Loved the way the DCT demo bike rode when i test drove it just hope they can make mine just as good.....fingers crossed.(
 

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Have a '18 DCT that was purchased as a trike last April. Most of the time upshifts in gears 2 thru 7 are very smooth but downshifts leave a lot to be desired. I use the manual paddle shifters most of the time to smooth the downshifts out. The bigger problem is if i pull away from a stop slowly (no more that 2500) rpm the bike will upshift to 2nd gear. If i drive it in a more spirited fashion and exceed 2500 rpm the bike fails to shift and will go all the way to the engine redline unless i close the throttle.
When it fails to upshift on its own in 1st gear i have tried to force it to upshift using the paddle shifter but still will not upshift. Sport mode is totally unusable (extremely clunky shifting and will not upshift at less than 5500 rpm in any of the 3 lower gears). Have not tried it in upper 4 gears at all. Finally gave up yesterday and trailered it to Honda/Russellville for them to evaluate and hopefully get if fixed.
Loved the way the DCT demo bike rode when i test drove it just hope they can make mine just as good.....fingers crossed.(
Have you done the DCT Initialization. If not I would try that first.

 

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Well, I had on order a new bagger Wing black metallic 2020 manual but the dealer tells me they are shipping him a DCT version first.

He said I'm able to take this DCT out and ride it and I may decide I like it better.

What I'm thinking is I'll just go with the DCT.
One other dealer in the South Carolina area told me he sells 10:1 ratio of DCT to manual. He won't even order a manual for the show room.
That surprised me.
I'm thinking resell on a DCT is going to be better than a manual as more guys will want it as we move forward and it becomes mainstream.

Plus, two big things for me is the wife won't ride with me much but if the smoother shifting of a DCT transmission is going to make it more comfortable
for her than the standard I'm all for it and the second and main reason is that ever since I had Victory Highball with ape hangers I've had numbness
and other issues with my hands and fingers. I know it's not just from riding but the cold weather doesn't help and all the computer keyboarding and CAD drafting doesn't either. So, since I'm still working and need my hands and fingers perhaps I need to go DCT and take some stress off from the clutch lever and having to
be on point to shift with that left hand. I don't want to give up riding and I still have my Suzuki DR650 dual sport when I want to get into some clutch work and riding standing up on my pegs.

Thoughts from you riders on the DCT for making life better for aged hands, wrists and fingers?
I'm seeing my chiropractor for the numbness and tingling and it's really helping. If giving me many more years of comfort riding with cruise control, heated grips
and an automatic tranny will help I should do this.
Purchased my 2018 DCT from one of the largest dealers in the Midwest, know the owner personally. Owner states the DCT far outsells the manual since coming out in 2018.

I have a hereditary condition in my hands (Duputrens Contracture). After 4 hand surgeries I can still work a clutch but the DCT is so worth it for my hand condition and for many other reasons. You will not regret getting a DCT. Be sure to read the "DCT Riding Tips" posted on this site. A lot of good advice.

DCT riding - tips, techniques, observations

When I test rode the 2018 I was not even interested in riding the DCT. The dealership owner insisted I ride the DCT after riding the manual. After 30 minutes on the DCT that was all she wrote.

Now after more than 10,000 miles I love the DCT more than ever.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Thank you Doug

I appreciate the link to the DCT TIPS. I'm reading now. I'll need some parking lot maneuvering practice before I head out and ride for sure. I'll miss the clutch lever for that friction zone but once I practice without it I'll be fine. I rode a Zero electric bike and it was similar in that throttle only and all control was foot brake and throttle. A much lighter bike mind you but still took me miles in Chicago before I figured out no clutch lever or foot shift required. : )
 
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