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2018 Honda Gold Wing
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There is one more aspect to the DCT that has not been mentioned: TRAFFIC! Spend 20 minutes in any major city at rush hour, or a traffic collision and you will rethink the MT, and wonder why you did not get the DCT!
I never think that at all..the clutch pull is so light with this bike that you don't even think about the clutch.
 

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Until I got arthritis, I too never thought about the clutch.
How do you pull the front brake..the clutch is nowhere near as hard to pull as the front brake lever.
 

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How do you pull the front brake..the clutch is nowhere near as hard to pull as the front brake lever.
Arthritis in left hand only. Weight is a factor, but so is movement. We can't always lane-split. In stop-n-go, socal traffic, I can be pulling the clutch hundreds of times per session, creeping forward a few feet--or inches--at a time.
 

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2019 Red/Black Tour DCT airbag
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Depends which hand has arthritis! Plus you don't pull the front brake all the way into the grip - big difference if you have arthritis. Bike also has linked brakes so one can use more pedal if needs be.

I'm not knocking the M6. It's great that such a big bike can have such a light clutch (it's about time). But everyone's needs are different and if the DCT can make riding easier (or even possible) for some riders then that's perfect.
 

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2019 Darkness Black Goldwing DCT (1800BD)
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Arthritis in left hand only. Weight is a factor, but so is movement. In stop-n-go, socal traffic, I can be pulling the clutch hundreds of times per session, creeping forward a few feet--or inches--at a time (I can't always lane-split).
That's my thing - no clutching in traffic. When splitting on street (5-10 MPH) or creeping (can't split) it's almost always just rear brake for me, hands are free from any levers. I don't think many people realize just how BAD Los Angeles traffic can be, and if you're in the Hollywood/WeHo or West Hills area you may be clutching 100 times a block, as you're on an incline, and traffic barely moves (and if you don't don't barely move with it, a car WILL nose in and take your space).
 
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That's my thing - no clutching in traffic. When splitting on street (5-10 MPH) or creeping (can't split) it's almost always just rear brake for me, hands are free from any levers. I don't think many people realize just how BAD Los Angeles traffic can be, and if you're in the Hollywood/WeHo or West Hills area you may be clutching 100 times a block, as you're on an incline, and traffic barely moves (and if you don't don't barely move with it, a car WILL nose in and take your space).
For all the California comtempt spewed our way, people keep trying to escape other parts of the country and move here. The population is too dense, and too many vehicles try to share limited road resources. We no longer have a "rush hour"; in and near some of our cities we can't tell the difference between commute and non-commute times. Sometimes there's heavy traffic into the wee hours. The population pressure forces too many backed-upped intersections and requires too many freeway entries and exits. As people try to squeeze through them, clogged intersections become grid-locked and sometimes impassible. As people try to enter or exit freeways, individual choke-points merge into a single, miles-long choke-point. Some "freeways" are choked so consistently that some cities' designate streets as "freeway alternate routes." Ironic, right? Around some cities the freeways have become so choked that it's faster to use the streets.

That there are so few incidents of road-range relative to the number of potential flash points is a testament to the reservoirs of good will and patience from which we draw. Those living elsewhere can't understand until they drive a mile in our flip-flops.
 

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For all the California comtempt spewed our way, people keep trying to escape other parts of the country and move here. The population is too dense, and too many vehicles try to share limited road resources. We no longer have a "rush hour"; in and near some of our cities we can't tell the difference between commute and non-commute times. Sometimes there's heavy traffic into the wee hours. The population pressure forces too many backed-upped intersections and requires too many freeway entries and exits. As people try to squeeze through them, clogged intersections become grid-locked and sometimes impassible. As people try to enter or exit freeways, individual choke-points merge into a single, miles-long choke-point. Some "freeways" are choked so often that some cities' streets are marked as "freesay alternative routes." (Ironic, right?)

That there are so few incidents of road-range relative to the number of potential flash points is a testament to the reservoirs of good will and patience from which we draw. Those living elsewhere can't understand until they drive a mile in our flip-flops.
It's also why lane splitting is a god-send! Only way to stay sane - keep moving in traffic, even when traffic is stopped!
 
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Never lane split and never will. Too risky for me.
Out of curiosity, what do you say to people who, when they find out you ride a motorcycle, say, "Never rode a motorcycle and never will. Too risky for me."
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Out of curiosity, what do you say to people who, when they find out you ride a motorcycle, say, "Never rode a motorcycle and never will. Too risky for me."
i say you are probably smart not to ride a bike as in a world full of texters and distracted drivers it’s the wild Wild West. I choose to ride, but always ride like people are trying to play whack a mole with my life through apathy and the distraction of a modern me me me world.
 

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Between the two, there's some difference in the riding experience. The clutched version provides more intimacy with the motorcycle--a more inward experience. The DCT allows more appreciation of the world you're riding through--a more outward experience. Whichever you choose, you'll gain and you'll lose, but in the end you'll be in love.

Edit: It's a joy watching you think your way through this.
Well-said. I'm always riding in amazingly beautiful territory, with some of the most challenging roads or off-road situations, whether it be on-road or off. Because of this, half the time I am hammering it and the other half I back off, looking in awe at the beauty of the scenery and thinking "how lucky am I to be here".
 

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DCT vs manual and our "seat of the pants" opinions...
Cousin drove my 2015 SRT392 Challenger auto 8 Spd. Coincidentally, he'd just rented a manual (same engine) a couple weeks before. I asked him what he thought of the difference. He swore the manual was faster. His words: "a lot faster." He claimed he'd never buy the auto for that reason. Yet at the dragstrip everybody knows that 8 speed DCT will beat the manual every time. The auto is faster, end of story. My point? For reasons explained above, it doesn't feel that way.

Oh, and almost forgot: it felt like it was neutering the throttle just a bit a split second after each shift. Maybe for the same reason as our Gold Wing DCT?
The "neutering of the throttle" you feel is just the transmission and throttle working together to complete the shift. Which is exactly what you do with a manual. You know the feeling...you are hard on the throttle, then you release it to engage the clutch, the bikes front end drops and you gotta keep yourself from going forward since you were just a microsecond ago, leaning forward to compensate for the acceleration. You release the clutch after your foot goes up, then full throttle again. You go back to leaning forward a bit.

The difference is, you are not doing it. The DCT does it so much faster than a person ever could. Imagine if the DCT shifted as slow as a human. That slight neutering would feel more like an eternity of lost acceleration.

I have had a few races with Harley friends. They go to shift and the whole cycle I described above is extremely noticeable. With a flick of my finger, I shift with very little drama and continue the acceleration with them getting further and further behind me.
 

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No, you're not meant to back off the throttle when manually shifting the DCT. You don't in "drive", so why would you in manual. That's the magic of it. Constant smooth acceleration, no break in power, and no helmet tap from your passenger.
LOL, yep
 

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i say you are probably smart not to ride a bike as in a world full of texters and distracted drivers it’s the wild Wild West. I choose to ride, but always ride like people are trying to play whack a mole with my life through apathy and the distraction of a modern me me me world.
Same answer about lane-splitting.
 

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...
Humans feel something called the jerk force - which is a change in acceleration. ...
What does this mean in DCT versus MT? Well - this is where that perfect, tens of milliseconds shift and rev match come into play. The system has a LOT less change in acceleration when it shifts! It maintains the acceleration much, much better than an MT - a lot less time NOT with full torque/power delivered - so that it doesn't "feel" as fast, because you're not getting literally jerked around as much!
That is the biggest complaint about the new 465 lbs-ft torque mid-engine Corvette. It does 1/4 mile in 11.1 seconds but its DCT 8-speed is so smooth it feels slow.
 
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