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4200km in 4 ½ Days

Thought you guys might like to see what us aussies are up to this time of the year.
The thought and idea of such a trip started back in Sept 04 when the first ride for the Victorian members had a visit from some of our members in Qld. This again was rekindled just recently when it was suggested cheekily that we should come up for a ride some time. John B and I looked at each other and so the process started. A couple of days later I asked John B and his wife Marg what about a ride to visit one of the Qld rides he was good for the ride, as most retired people are with time on there hands, for me it was a little harder, and for my wife it was impossible so I asked for time off work and it was all approved. In the mean time we looked at the calendar and selected the 15 Oct as it looked like the most interesting ride.

The morning of the ride we got away early at around 0630 and headed north, we knew this was going to be a long and quick ride and the usual stopping was not going to happen. The first leg was around 300 km with a break for fuel and on the way. As we crossed over the border into NSW and heading into the hotter parts of NSW the temp was stating to rise 28, 30, 35, 36 and rising. As the temp was rising it caused us to have a few drink breaks along the way with the first night of Dubbo well with in our sights we pulled into Dubbo for a well earned cool down and sleep.

The next day saw on our way early heading for a early day to Toowoomba. John B outside Dubbo had a bit of a disagreement with an emu with John B winning this time, however I think the emu will come with some mates next time.

As I have not been passed Boggabilla the ride up thru that region was new and it took some of the mind off riding and my ever increasing saw ars#%^#%^.(I usually head inland and go up the New England Hwy) Today saw us getting into Toowoomba to John B dad's place around 4.00pm. Again for a rest and a good Jim beam and coke. We were now in place to head down to the start point on the Sunday morning.

We decided to get an early start again and headed towards the start point, arriving to a startled group of Qld riders, as it started to sink in that these crazy Victorians had come up just for the ride we had our briefing and headed for a great ride over the mountains and I don’t think the wings hit a straight bit of road until well into the afternoon, a few left at the lunch spot and the rest off us rode the rest of the afternoon over some great roads. The day ended with a cuppa at a flower shop (the only flower shop John B has gone too without buying any thing that did not stop Marg from trying to persuade me to take some plants back on the bike as I had more room). As the day drew too a close we headed back to Toowoomba for a rest before heading out the next day back to Melbourne.

The return journey was back the same way with a cautions ride near Dubbo incase the emu was out for revenge the first leg home saw us stopping in West Wylong and heading home the following day with us arriving home at around 2pm looking forward to a well earned rest before heading back to work on the Wednesday.

Was the idea that was thought of two years earlier which came to fruition two years later worth it? Yes we all put our well earned money into buying the biggest tourer in the world yet half of us don’t get the opportunity to use it for what it was intended so any opportunity to do same thing like this and ride in comfort is worth it.

This ended a great trip, in great company, on perfect riding roads.











 

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great report. Seems like Australia would be perfect on a wing. Lot's of open spaces. A lot like here in Arizona, only bigger. :D
 
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John, nice report and as stated nice country. I do have one question. I was watching The Discovery Channel Sunday and they had a show on Australia. They showed a road that runs from Sydney to Perth. What I was wondering is, it looks like there is nothing out there and I mean nothing. Where does a person get gas or stay overnight?? I really injoyed watching the program and learned a lot about your wonderful country.

Thanks,
Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Tom
Here is a bit of a summary of the Nullabor plains its all OK until you get into SA. I have not done the trip myself but it is on the list to do we would ride over and rail the bikes back
Regards
John
Mike from WA might be able to give more info. You guys should come oversome time and give it a go.
The Nullabor Plain
The Eyre Highway is one of Australia's great road journeys. It is named after the explorer, Edward John Eyre, who in 1841 barely survived thirst, hunger and treachery by guides to make the first East-West crossing of the continent. The entire length of the highway is bitumen and is extremely well signposted, with indications of the distance to the next town with petrol and other services.
The trip begins properly at Port Augusta, 330km north-east of Adelaide at the head of Spencer Gulf, a provincial city that services a vast area of semi-arid grazing and wheat growing country.
The Highway meets the sea at Ceduna, a small modern town on picturesque Murat Bay. On the outskirts of Ceduna is a warning sign about the last reliable water. This marks the end of cultivated country and the beginning of the deserted, almost treeless land that creeps towards the Nullarbor Plain. The highway stays close to the coast and there is always a little scrub and other vegetation on the plains or on the sand dunes that lie between the Highway and the ocean.
The name 'Nullarbor' derives its name from Latin for 'no trees' and the name is more than apt. Nullarbor may not be strictly correct Latin for “treeless”, but it’s an apt description of the plain which stretches flat and infertile for over 1200kmThe Eyre Highway crosses only a small section of true treeless plain. West of Ceduna is Penong, a town of 100 windmills, and breathtaking coastal beauty. Then on to Nundroo and south to the abandoned settlement of Fowlers Bay, once an exploration depot for Edward John Eyre and now a charming ghost town best known for its fishing. At the Yalata Aboriginal Community, there are genuine artefacts for sale.
Between Nullarbor and Border Village are five of the most spectacular coastal lookouts anywhere on the Australian coastline, where giant ocean swells pound the towering limestone cliffs that make up this part of the Great Australian Bight. From June to October, an added bonus is the chance of spotting the majestic Southern Right Whale on its annual migration along the southern part of the continent.
The Western Australian section of the Highway begins at Border Village, which has a celebrated signpost giving directions to Paris, the South Pole and other rather improbable destinations. A further 12km west, is the town of Eucla.
Eucla was established as a telegraph station in 1877 as part of the link between East and West. Once it was one of the busiest, yet loneliest, stations in Australia. The modern township was located on the Hampton Escarpment after the original buildings were swallowed by sand dunes.
At night an illuminated cross dedicated to all Eyre Highway travellers looks down onto the ruins of old Eucla from the escarpment above.
Travelling from Eucla the road passes through Mundrabilla then onto Madura. It is here that the Highway again climbs to the Escarpment allowing a magnificent view and then continues to Cocklebiddy.
In 1984, a world diving record was set at Cocklebiddy Cave, 12 kilometres north of the Highway on an accessible road. Also of interest in the area is the Eyre Bird Observatory (four-wheel drive vehicles only).
Between Caiguna and Balladonia travel along one of the longest straight stretches of road in the world, 145km. East of Balladonia Hotel and Service Station, visit the Balladonia Station Homestead and see a gallery of oil paintings depicting the history of Balladonia and the Eyre Highway. After Balladonia and its century old stone fences, the Highway traverses the hilly and undulating country surrounding the Fraser Range. From there it is only a short drive to Norseman, where the Eyre Highway terminates.
If planning a return journey, you may like to consider driving one way and placing the car on the train for the return.
Important Reminder
There are limited Eftpos banking facilities.
There are limited fresh water supplies between Norseman and Ceduna.
Be sure to take on sufficient water for your journey.
Prohibited or restricted items include potatoes, onions, fruit, walnuts, bird seed, other seed, plants, soil, animal skins and wool, livestock, grain, fodder, used fruit containers, used potato sacks, birds, rabbits, native fauna and honey.





 
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Thanks John, looks like a very interesting road and should make a very interesting trip.

Tom
 
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