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I would not go back...nough said.

Well, also lol...it is just a joy to be riding and it does its thing yet you can do your thing if you want. If you get one I offer you also buy the foot shifter. I got the foot shifter used and feel it is a plus.

Last, these are big bikes now days plus be it ‘fun’ to row the gears, when on a long ride it takes your time and mind control to change the gears the live long day. There are times with a dct in Touring mode that you feel like just letting it do its thing so you can focus on the turns ahead, road conditions, checking you gps or rever? App. Going into a turn just process the shift button and you are good to go.

Just my take but glad I got it instead of a manual. I won’t go back to a manaul.

I would have to really try out the quick shifter feature on the 2021 bmw r1200rt before I would jump ship from this 2019 wing. It also has the airbag thus another reason not to jump ship....dam...have to also say I love the wings engine. Ok, I am done.
 

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I would not go back...nough said.

Well, also lol...it is just a joy to be riding and it does its thing yet you can do your thing if you want. If you get one I offer you also buy the foot shifter. I got the foot shifter used and feel it is a plus.

Last, these are big bikes now days plus be it ‘fun’ to row the gears, when on a long ride it takes your time and mind control to change the gears the live long day. There are times with a dct in Touring mode that you feel like just letting it do its thing so you can focus on the turns ahead, road conditions, checking you gps or rever? App. Going into a turn just process the shift button and you are good to go.

Just my take but glad I got it instead of a manual. I won’t go back to a manaul.

I would have to really try out the quick shifter feature on the 2021 bmw r1200rt before I would jump ship from this 2019 wing. It also has the airbag thus another reason not to jump ship....dam...have to also say I love the wings engine. Ok, I am done.
I would not go back...nough said.

Well, also lol...it is just a joy to be riding and it does its thing yet you can do your thing if you want. If you get one I offer you also buy the foot shifter. I got the foot shifter used and feel it is a plus.

Last, these are big bikes now days plus be it ‘fun’ to row the gears, when on a long ride it takes your time and mind control to change the gears the live long day. There are times with a dct in Touring mode that you feel like just letting it do its thing so you can focus on the turns ahead, road conditions, checking you gps or rever? App. Going into a turn just process the shift button and you are good to go.

Just my take but glad I got it instead of a manual. I won’t go back to a manaul.

I would have to really try out the quick shifter feature on the 2021 bmw r1200rt before I would jump ship from this 2019 wing. It also has the airbag thus another reason not to jump ship....dam...have to also say I love the wings engine. Ok, I am done.
I have had the quick shifter on the BMW. It is a good feature, but not remotely in the class of the DCT shifter, especially in the lower gears.
 

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My 2 cents: Drove trucks(Class A) for years all manual trannys; I won't drive any personal vehicle without auto-trans. Now when it comes to my MC, its MANUAL all the time. My left hand can disengage the rear tire in a millisecond if need be, and I need to have that control in ALL situations. Yeah, I like the DCT for screwing around and saying "look at me, I can FLY" but your life is more important than gimmicky auto stuff! Stick with the 6-Speed Manual and stay in control at ALL TIMES. The DCT could take-off without warning! Just look at Boeing and there issues with the 737Max on Auto Pilot--BIG FAIL.
 

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My 2 cents: my DCT is a dream, except at slow speeds when trying to maneuver. At 2-5 mph, and turning the forks lock to lock doing U turns and such, the DCT makes it very difficult for me to do this smoothly and confidently. Granted there are WAYS to deal with this, but I'm not very good at it. My last bike had a clutch and was much easier to handle at these very slow speeds.
For me, the pro's of the DCT outweigh the con's, so I'm happy, but just thought I'd weigh in here.
 

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My 2 cents also. Same as above, DCT is GREAT! Would not go back. I've rode bikes for many many years and shifting gears on a manual is just like breathing after many many years. I have said this before, a good friend of mine rode a demo bike with both the manual and the DCT. He was 100% sure he would buy the manual before the rides. Just like me, he changed his mind and was 100% DCT. He also had ridden for years. It's just a much more enjoyable ride to me. I don't miss the shifting at all and now would NOT want to go back to it. If my bike is stolen tonight, it's another DCT tomorrow.
 

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My 2 cents: Drove trucks(Class A) for years all manual trannys; I won't drive any personal vehicle without auto-trans. Now when it comes to my MC, its MANUAL all the time. My left hand can disengage the rear tire in a millisecond if need be, and I need to have that control in ALL situations. Yeah, I like the DCT for screwing around and saying "look at me, I can FLY" but your life is more important than gimmicky auto stuff! Stick with the 6-Speed Manual and stay in control at ALL TIMES. The DCT could take-off without warning! Just look at Boeing and there issues with the 737Max on Auto Pilot--BIG FAIL.
I see you've never had a clutch cable snap... Because that leaves you ALWAYS ENGAGED, and it will continue to take off without warning!

Seriously...
 
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My 2 cents: my DCT is a dream, except at slow speeds when trying to maneuver. At 2-5 mph, and turning the forks lock to lock doing U turns and such, the DCT makes it very difficult for me to do this smoothly and confidently. Granted there are WAYS to deal with this, but I'm not very good at it. My last bike had a clutch and was much easier to handle at these very slow speeds.
For me, the pro's of the DCT outweigh the con's, so I'm happy, but just thought I'd weigh in here.
I went through that adjustment on my CTX700 back in 2015. The key is good amounts of throttle and standing on the rear brake. It REALLY makes it handle like a manual with a slipping, friction-zone clutch move. It does take practice to get it down (just like you spent on the friction-zone operation), but it works just as well. And after about 6 months, it was seamless and normal to do. Moving to the Wing was just a step up in power, weight - and wheelbase. Other than that - exact same technique works to turn around in tight spaces.
 
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Honestly, before the DCT came out I never knew shifting was a thing. I always thought it was just a part of what makes riding a motorcycle so enjoyable. My Goldwing requires less shifting than any motorcycle I've ever owned. For me, I prefer a manual, but since its introduction there have been some valid arguments for the DCT. It all comes down to personal choice and need. Someone else's right answer may be the wrong answer for you.
 

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If I get one, it'll be a manual. I don't want to have to learn how to do tight maneuvers on a DCT. It's hard enough with a clutch. The number of times I might need to make a U-Turn is low, so I would never get the technique into muscle memory. I'm short and don't weigh a lot. Plus, I enjoy the hell out of shifting!
 

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Good point about low speed turns. I trail the rear brake when doing them. Not a perfect solution but it works. Guess likewise, initial start is not per say as easy as with a clutch that you can feather as you start out. Still DCT all the way for me.
 
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2+2=4 cents. I understand the concept of trail braking and using the throttle to do slow turn maneuvers. That's why I mentioned that there are WAYS to deal with it. I've tried it several times, and yes it works, but it's clumsy for me. Truth is I'll probably never use it. I've got two strong legs and they work just fine for that few seconds that I need to deal with U-turns and etc. This is not something that I need to do very often. U-turns only become a problem when and if they're so tight that the handlebars hit the stops (if that makes sense). Again, not a big deal; but it was worth mentioning.

One plus about the 7 speed DCT is how tight the gear spacing is. RPM's don't drop much when shifting. Sort of reminds me of my 392 SRT Challenger 8 spd auto, which is also blessed with lighting-quick shifting.
 

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My 2 cents: Drove trucks(Class A) for years all manual trannys; I won't drive any personal vehicle without auto-trans. Now when it comes to my MC, its MANUAL all the time. My left hand can disengage the rear tire in a millisecond if need be, and I need to have that control in ALL situations. Yeah, I like the DCT for screwing around and saying "look at me, I can FLY" but your life is more important than gimmicky auto stuff! Stick with the 6-Speed Manual and stay in control at ALL TIMES. The DCT could take-off without warning! Just look at Boeing and there issues with the 737Max on Auto Pilot--BIG FAIL.
I am with you but we're against the wind on this one. With matching skills, I have trouble thinking that someone with a DCT has the slow-speed maneuverability, and confidence, that I do with a clutch. I think part of the issue is many just want to get on and ride. I don't know... not sure. As long as they are happy who can argue. Just ride...

Chuck
 

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I am with you but we're against the wind on this one. With matching skills, I have trouble thinking that someone with a DCT has the slow-speed maneuverability, and confidence, that I do with a clutch. I think part of the issue is many just want to get on and ride. I don't know... not sure. As long as they are happy who can argue. Just ride...

Chuck
Well, you may not win that bet...


It's a different technique - and it is pretty much just as effective. The friction zone is not about propulsion, it's about gyroscopic forces in the motor. And you can get that with rear brake and throttle. Different, but just as effective.
 

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Yeah I saw that video a while back. But I'm just a klutz, I guess. So... I stick a leg out and make my turn. No big deal, and I have nothing to prove to anybody. But the video at least proved that it can be done. That's a plus.
 

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Yeah I saw that video a while back. But I'm just a klutz, I guess. So... I stick a leg out and make my turn. No big deal, and I have nothing to prove to anybody. But the video at least proved that it can be done. That's a plus.
Totally agree. Having ridden both long-term, they both are equally capable, it's just a learning curve either way. Totally capable though!
 
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The friction zone is not about propulsion, it's about gyroscopic forces in the motor. And you can get that with rear brake and throttle. Different, but just as effective.
I often see this statement that the gyroscopic forces in the GL1800 motor help provide low-speed stability. I don't understand this reasoning, but from what I've seen you may be able to help me understand. I do know that the gyroscopic forces of the wheels provide stability, and also the gyroscopic forces of the crank and flywheels of motors such as the Harley's and others that spin the crank in the direction of travel. I fail to see how opposed engines such as the GL1800 help provide stability.

Seriously. I'm hoping you might shed a little light on this subject.

Glen
 
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Well, you may not win that bet...


It's a different technique - and it is pretty much just as effective. The friction zone is not about propulsion, it's about gyroscopic forces in the motor. And you can get that with rear brake and throttle. Different, but just as effective.
But there are times when you really need to control forward motion, gain gyroscopic stability and put pressure on the rear brake. With DCT all that translates to more throttle and apply brake. Seems like less tools in the tool box and a heck of a lot of pressure on the rear brake... and that engine cannot stall or you're in trouble. The problem is I would love to try it but would have to buy to know. Thanks for the video.

Chuck
 

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I often see this statement that the gyroscopic forces in the GL1800 motor help provide low-speed stability. I don't understand this reasoning, but from what I've seen you may be able to help me understand. I do know that the gyroscopic forces of the wheels provide stability, and also the gyroscopic forces of the crank and flywheels of motors such as the Harley's and others that spin the crank in the direction of travel. I fail to see how opposed engines such as the GL1800 help provide stability.

Seriously. I'm hoping you might shed a little light on this subject.

Glen
You are right Glen. You certainly understand what I'm about to say. I was a science teacher for awhile, so bear with me as I try to explain what you just said. Though the GW has one of the largest engines in the industry, and thus has a greater "flywheel effect" than many other bikes, the direction of engine rotation does indeed make a difference. We're all familiar with the gyroscopic effect of spinning wheels. But we don't typically think much about that spinning engine. In science class we had al bicycle wheel attached to an axle with special handles. When spinning, it was very difficult to change the rotational axis of that wheel. However, there was practically no resistance to simple rotating the handles in our hands (picture the motion of turning a screwdriver). Great resistance in one direction, hardly any in another. This had to do with the plane of rotation, and it was easy enough to understand while we played with that spinning wheel. Our Goldwing engine spins longitudinally. Leaning left or right is not affected much at all by the rotation of the motor: hence very little effect on handling or stability. Now picture a large transverse engine, like the Kawasaki 1400. The crankshaft spins perpendicular to the forward motion of the bike. The rotating mass of it's engine will fight against leaning the bike. The faster the gyroscope is spinning, the harder it is to alter the plane of rotation. Same with an engine. More RPMs equal greater effect on handling, and greater stability (think riding with no hands). Our GWs, however don't do this as the engine spins parallel to the bike's forward motion.

The only difference would be revving the motor, which will indeed produce a left-right rocking motion. This has to do with thrust being applied to rotating mass. Remember studying acceleration and the laws of motion? Every action has an equal and opposite reaction: "gunning" the motor produces a twisting "reaction."
Most of us probably know all this stuff already, but just thought I'd have some fun in recapping some of the things I used to teach.
Sure do miss that classroom and those kids...
 

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I often see this statement that the gyroscopic forces in the GL1800 motor help provide low-speed stability. I don't understand this reasoning, but from what I've seen you may be able to help me understand. I do know that the gyroscopic forces of the wheels provide stability, and also the gyroscopic forces of the crank and flywheels of motors such as the Harley's and others that spin the crank in the direction of travel. I fail to see how opposed engines such as the GL1800 help provide stability.

Seriously. I'm hoping you might shed a little light on this subject.

Glen
ANY gyroscope with a force perpendicular to the axis of rotation will have a precession associated with it. A precession is an angular (not axis of rotation) force relative to the central axis - and it's inherent in rotation:


It is not as strong as a force as the wheels (either the boxer 6 or V twin) due to mass and diameter, but a gyro attempts to resist ANY directional change in rotational motion - not just in to forces along its rotational axis.

See the video on the linked page, at 1:48 - note the gyro rotates around a center axis, and as it rotates, takes positions that would be HD and Goldwing (it rotates a full 360 about the vertical axis - meaning it covers lateral and longitudinal axes of the bike).

This page is a pretty good explanation of what's going on - and the visuals at 1:48 should really explain what is going on.
 
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