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I have an opportunity to purchase a 78 goldwing. It has 5500 mile on it. The guy is the original owner. He rode it for the first year and parked and covered it and its still covered. He did drain the gas from the tank.

I know there will be a lot of things to go through but taking that all in what would you value it as? It is in prestine condition. It also has the complete Vetter outfit. Trunk, bags and front fairing
 

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I don't know anything about value, but how long has the oil been in the bike? I passed on a Wing that had 1 oil change in 10 years and 8k miles.

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I'd be careful too.

Sometimes more damage is done from sitting than from running it.
If you DO buy it, the FIRST thing to do is change the timing belts.
 

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The value is relatively low in my opinion as it stands now.... non running with potential for a fun project for someone that enjoys that and many do. Parts for a classic like that have good value for someone interested in parting it out. ... $1000 at the most.

Once you go through the bike and getting it running and rideable the value of coarse increases. For this I would say $3-5K unless it’s in incredible shape..... this will likely take considerable time and some investment in parts.

I’m no expert but like riding my ‘78.

On Monday I just pushed home a ‘98 super blackbird that a 80 year old neighbor gave to me. It has some issues I’m working through. 12,000 original miles. Just this week alone I have more than 20 hours in it troubleshooting. I will have way more than that when I’m done. It’s cheaper to just buy them in good shape than it is to mess with them unless you enjoy it like I do. Good summer project for my climate controlled little shop.

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I agree with Zee. A non-running bike is worth considerably less than one that runs, even if poorly. Carb rebuild on a GW is more expensive than on other bikes (there are specialty suppliers for gaskets, valves and jets). Tires, tubes, brake lines, fork seals, etc., will have to be replaced. Water pump seals may be hardened. Coolant may be rusty. Tank may be rusty. Compression may be poor (but it's easy to test, even if the bike doesn't run).

A nice, running '78 is worth maybe $3,000 at best. They aren't as collectible as the '75-'76 models. You'll be spending at least $1,500 on repairs to that bike, even if it's in good shape.

If you get it going with all the right parts, it'll be a great runner.
 

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I'd make sure the engine isn't locked up. Pull the spark plugs and fill each of the cylinders with Marvel Mystery Oil. Thin enough to get in pits but thick enough to lubricate. See if the engine will crank. It won't be worth much money but if it turns out to be a Skeeter Beater (heavy oil smoke) it'll be good for parts.
 

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Additional comment.

I think motorcycles in excellent cosmetic condition have display value that most people don’t think about. In order to display motorcycles most are dried out.... all fluids and such are drained. There is no reason that a motorcycle has to be in running condition to display in public places including museums. I think stuff like this has some value.

An example with super low miles in a controlled environment is rare and may be worth getting.
 

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Additional comment.

I think motorcycles in excellent cosmetic condition have display value that most people don’t think about. In order to display motorcycles most are dried out.... all fluids and such are drained. There is no reason that a motorcycle has to be in running condition to display in public places including museums. I think stuff like this has some value.

An example with super low miles in a controlled environment is rare and may be worth getting.
 
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