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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you've tried the other great ideas to open the door and still are stuck, this might help.
I tried the second ring on the cable etc. What I found was my tab had bent so the pull was not going forward but up. I must've bent it with my super human strength. If you follow the pull lever out to the green elbow, you might find it bent in away that doesn't afect the movement of the cable. So it doesn't release the locks. So I just bent it back down and now it pulls straight and the door opens.
 

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:thumbup:Thanks for the tip, have saved in my hints and tips folder. And now I have something to go check.
 

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The "real" problem with the left bag "sticking" is the kickstand.. :shrug:

If the kickstand was on the right,
the bike would lean right,
and stuff in the right saddle bag would press on the RIGHT cover..
and it would be the right saddle bag that would be the one that had all the problems.

Sometimes you can get a stubborn left bag to open by just putting the bike on the center stand
(that unloads some of the weight off the lid).

imho
:)

Dennis
 

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One would think that Honda could have revised the latching mechanism by now. It might have if enough customers complained during warranty. The same is true of the top case .

The "real" problem with the left bag "sticking" is the kickstand.. :shrug:

If the kickstand was on the right,
the bike would lean right,
and stuff in the right saddle bag would press on the RIGHT cover..
and it would be the right saddle bag that would be the one that had all the problems.

Sometimes you can get a stubborn left bag to open by just putting the bike on the center stand
(that unloads some of the weight off the lid).

imho
:)

Dennis
 

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Registered
Joined
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4,841 Posts
The "real" problem with the left bag "sticking" is the kickstand.. :shrug:

If the kickstand was on the right,
the bike would lean right,
and stuff in the right saddle bag would press on the RIGHT cover..
and it would be the right saddle bag that would be the one that had all the problems.

Sometimes you can get a stubborn left bag to open by just putting the bike on the center stand
(that unloads some of the weight off the lid).

imho
:)

Dennis
The only time I had a problem was when the bike was new and I overloaded the left bag and it was too tight. When I then pulled too hard on the release, I broke the green clip. Took it to the dealer and they fixed it under warranty. Since then I; 1) don't overload it 2) push in a little on the lid with my hand while pulling the release when I think it is loaded tight. Five years, no more problems.
 

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One would think that Honda could have revised the latching mechanism by now. It might have if enough customers complained during warranty. The same is true of the top case .
Actually, they did, back in 2004. There is even a service bulletin on it. Now it works worse than it did before. Sometimes you have to be careful what you ask for, you might just get it.:lol:

Troubleshooting the latch mechanism often takes a high degree of mechanical aptitude because much of the mechanism is hidden from view. Sometimes you can follow the tips on this board and get lucky. But in many cases only the symptom gets treated, while the root problem is still there.

The broken clips and bent mechanism levers are only the result, not the root cause. They break due to excessive pressure, not because they are weak. Those clips are made of plastic with the intent of creating a weak link in order to avoid more serious and expensive problems.

Back when my bike was new, it took me about 6 frustrating hours to troubleshoot and fix my sticking trunk and left saddlebag latch. I couldn't begin to describe in words the approach I took and the fix, because it took a series of trial and error steps. But it now works smoother than any other bike I have seen, and has been very reliable for about 8 years now.

This is where a good tech earns his paycheck, and marks him as a troubleshooter or parts replacer.

The mechanism works well when everything is aligned properly. I think the root problem is that the design created too many variables to expect everything to just fall into place on the manufacturing floor. During assembly, when the line worker assembles parts according to manufacturing spec, it should work properly first time, and every time. I did not find anything that was assembled wrong on my latch mechanism. It's fit requires too much precision to be acceptable in a mass production environment.

Part of the problem is that the cable stretches somewhat in the first month or so of use, and the mech can't compensate. Moving the adjustment to the next ring will many times be the only fix that is needed. Unfortunately, too often arms have begun to bend by owners forcing the lever before that adjustment gets made.
 

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I should have said "fixed" rather than "revised" huh? <g>

I know what you mean about the latching mechanism. I built a Tag A Long using GL1800 sidecases and quickly learned how insubstantial and finicky it is. Building latches that work and are secure doesn't aeronautical engineers!

Actually, they did, back in 2004. There is even a service bulletin on it. Now it works worse than it did before. Sometimes you have to be careful what you ask for, you might just get it.:lol:

Troubleshooting the latch mechanism often takes a high degree of mechanical aptitude because much of the mechanism is hidden from view. Sometimes you can follow the tips on this board and get lucky. But in many cases only the symptom gets treated, while the root problem is still there.

The broken clips and bent mechanism levers are only the result, not the root cause. They break due to excessive pressure, not because they are weak. Those clips are made of plastic with the intent of creating a weak link in order to avoid more serious and expensive problems.

Back when my bike was new, it took me about 6 frustrating hours to troubleshoot and fix my sticking trunk and left saddlebag latch. I couldn't begin to describe in words the approach I took and the fix, because it took a series of trial and error steps. But it now works smoother than any other bike I have seen, and has been very reliable for about 8 years now.

This is where a good tech earns his paycheck, and marks him as a troubleshooter or parts replacer.

The mechanism works well when everything is aligned properly. I think the root problem is that the design created too many variables to expect everything to just fall into place on the manufacturing floor. During assembly, when the line worker assembles parts according to manufacturing spec, it should work properly first time, and every time. I did not find anything that was assembled wrong on my latch mechanism. It's fit requires too much precision to be acceptable in a mass production environment.

Part of the problem is that the cable stretches somewhat in the first month or so of use, and the mech can't compensate. Moving the adjustment to the next ring will many times be the only fix that is needed. Unfortunately, too often arms have begun to bend by owners forcing the lever before that adjustment gets made.
 
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