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Has anyone ever had one, what is it like and do you have any tips for controlling one?? Besides having your life insurance paid up, do you have any suggestions?? Thanks, Greg
 

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Had a rear let go at about 85 mph leaned over in a curve. No idea how I managed to get bike stopped. I think it is a matter of luck in cases like this. Maybe if I was a professional rider I could come up with the sequenace of how I did it, but that isn't about to happen. Just say it was a experieance that I don't want to repeat.
 

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spine60 said:
Has anyone ever had one, what is it like and do you have any tips for controlling one?? Besides having your life insurance paid up, do you have any suggestions?? Thanks, Greg
If it's the front and it gets caught up in the brakes or spokes and locks, you're basically along for the ride. If the wheel keeps spinning free don't touch the brakes (front or rear) and let the bike slow on its own (geography permitting of course). Hopefully that will give enough time for the AH following too close to back himself down without putting his grill up your rear. Try to keep the bike as straight as possible, even after it slows.

If it's the rear the same general rules apply except you can use the front brake gently - no hard braking or sudden turns. If the rear wheel locks you can attempt to keep the bike in a straight line and skid to a stop (again, hoping the guy behind you isn't too close and is paying attention).

The trick here is not to have any sort of tire failure. Check each tire thoroughly before every ride (or at beginning of the day as appropriate). I always kick each tire before mounting up to ensure it hasn't developed a leak. Soft tires will blow out (but you will usually know well beforehand because the bike will begin to handle poorly). Don't let your tires get too old (they age while waiting to be used too) and keep the pressures at recommendation (adjusted for speed and load as well).

You asked what it is like? How about a giant grabbing you with both hands around the neck and shaking you senseless? That's about as close as I can come to a description. It will happen so fast instinct will take over. You won't have time for a conscious decision.
 

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Apply brakes gently to the opposite wheel from the blowout. Slighter firmer grip on the bars, keep your eyes up, pick a safe place to pull over, clutch in.

In most cases, blow-outs are preventable. Most occur from under-inflation, over-loaded, or tire neglect (tire defect, worn to cords etc). Check your tires for problems & proper air pressure at least once a week.

If you pickup a nail or screw while riding, you will experience a gradual loss of tire pressure.
 

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Flat tire? I didn't notice.

I have to tell the story an old guy related many years ago.
He was riding on a sunny day, on his big Indian motorcycle (large car tires)
He was watching the sunlight forming a shadow of his bike on the pavement beside him. He started wandering what was causing the strip of sunlight along the shadow of his front tire. Turns out the tire had gone flat and was pulling away from the rim at the top of the wheel. He said he started slowing down gradually and it didn't get sloppy until he was easing to a stop on the shoulder. Same guy told a story about trying to get his cycle out of a wheelie with a case of beer sitting on his knees. Fact, or fiction. You can be the judge.
:lol: :lol: :lol:
DC
 

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3 words: No sudden moves.

I wish the beginner's MSF course would go back to the video on 'Special Situations', but whether its a blowout, bridge grating, rain, etc. the action is prefaced with no sudden moves.

I had a rear tire fast deflation in an off ramp while leaned over at 50 mph.
My action was to ease off the throttle, slowly straighten and come to a slow, gradual stop. Slow & easy did it.

Many moves are counterintuitive; when I was too late in slowing down for a bad RR crossing, I gassed it & surmounted. A bike following got on the brakes compressing the forks & upon crossing the tracks, the fork seals blew.

For those old enough to remember the Bill Cosby albums:

'when in a skid, steer in the direction of the skid'

OK, who can finish this routine?
 

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Lost my rear Metzler on my Valk about 6 years ago, two up on Interstate 20, in South Carolina (fully loaded for a vacation trip) at about 85 mph. That steel belt in the Metzler keep it together until I could coast to a stop on the shoulder. Checking out the tire, I found an 2 inch gash in the sidewall. I don't recall running over anything. Fortunately, I was traveling on a straight section of roadway. The incident had a pucker factor of 8 (or a head and back pounding from my wife of 12+). Talk about luck; there was a Honda dealer (Carolina Powersports) at the exit and we were on our way in less than an hour. Great dealership.
 

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I think it is very important not to panic. I know that is easier said than done. I had a rear blowout on my 2002 Yamaha Venture. I was on a four lane highway (two each way) and was doing about 70. The bike felt like the rear end was on ice. I looked in the mirror and a semi was behind me following way too close and a car was passing it.
I didn't hit the brakes and I didn't worry about the semi (much). There wasn't anything I could do about the semi except hope he was able to avoid me. He did, of course, locking his brakes and smoking tires until the car got by him and then he moved over and went around me. Once I slowed down enough to move off the road onto the gravel shoulder I just about passed out. My wife, riding on the back, was scared s-lss. I couldn't even put the bike on the side stand because the shoulder tilted so much I couldn't get the stand down.
I can't believe how many people pulled over to see if they could help. One guy even use his tire tool to dig a hole so I could put my side stand down. It was, needless to say, an exiting experience. But looking back on it I would have to say the main thing that kept us from being hurt or killed was not panicking (not giving up).
I've had a rear flat on my 2004 Goldwing since then and it was nowhere near the problem. I still think if the tire holds together on the Wing the radial will help hold it up.
 

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Good thing the semi driver did the right thing ( except maybe he was tailgating)
 

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I was riding this at 75mph on a busy highway when my front tire went down.


I went to lean and change lanes and the bike started to lean then stood right back up. Leaned again then it started getting scary. Slowed down enough to regain control and get to the shoulder. Made it but was shaking for about a half hour afterwards.
 

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South of Albuquerque, I was pulling a trailer, traveling around 80 MPH when the rear tire blew out.. the bike started moving left and right a bit. I managed to keep it from falling down. I did use a bit of front brake. Called a friend and he came with a flat bed to get me.

Near Ignacio Colorado, I had another rear go down, it just split and all the air went out... I was not towing at the time and it was not too bad, did not fall down.

Prior to the GL-1800 I had a Venture Royale, Was having fun with a BMW and running over 120 MPH when a LARGE chunk of tire left the bike. It was flopping back n forth and I thought the end was near !! I put as much weight as I could on the handle bars and made it off the road. The BMW guy stopped, shook my hand and gave me a bottle of water :lol:

I did fall down many years ago when a front tire blew and came off the rim.

Motorcycle tires can be dangerous !!

JMHO 8)
 

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Blown Rear Tire

Blew a rear tire during rush hour in the 3rd lane over from the shoulder at 70 mph on a slight curve. Started to fishtail and then wanted to go right...I just let it go right and the truck next to me noticed the problem and got out of my way (Thank God!) and the angle I was going I actually hit the brakes fairly hard or I was going into the ditch. It all turned out okay. I didn't go down and I didn't get hit. I did get it up on the center stand somehow...I think adrenilin helped out there! I don't think I really want to do that again...I had a 3 inch cut in the center of the tire and don't remember running over anything.
 
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