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If you install one of these valve stems BEWARE!


Installing them straight to the right will destroy the valve stem and core on the Goldwing. It hits on the brake pad housing. They must be 70 + - degrees off center. Crap I got to replace mine now.
 

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Smoky
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If you install one of these valve stems BEWARE!


Installing them straight to the right will destroy the valve stem and core on the Goldwing. It hits on the brake pad housing. They must be 70 degrees off center. Crap I got to replace mine now.
Rider Steve,
The stock 90* valve stem on the rear is facing to the left when sitting on the bike. I think it is pointing to the left because it would hit the brake caliper if facing to the right. Not positive on that though. It would be easier to air up if the stem is pointed to the left because the rotor will not be in the way.
 
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It would be easier to air up if the stem is pointed to the left because the rotor will not be in the way.
This is true. Some on the internet would have you believe otherwise. Don't listen to them their full of it.
 

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Yep.....

I know you got it put on the other day and that you posted not having to remove that tab on the rim. But several sites mention that you have to modify your rim for this valve.

Sorry it had to happen to ya.
 
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Yep. that caution is outlined clearly on their webpage. Sorry you didn't see it.

http://www.motorcycleanchor.com/tire_valves/index.htm
You mean this?

If mounting facing the caliper, for many years' models, you must install the valve at an slightly off-angle to prevent it from contacting the caliper (70 - 75° to direction of rotation of the wheel, instead of 90° -- please check clearance before dismounting the wheel to ensure your placement will be feasible (suggest use of a wax pencil to mark the acceptible seating angle).
Ya I saw it and I should have stayed away from it completely and installed the valve to the left. 70 to 75 degrees will keep you from busting the valve but what they don't tell you is you'll play hell putting air in the tire from that location on the Wing. I learned a lesson for sure. I've got the T ground off now and although the tire is still holding air I'll go ahead and have that valve replaced as the valve in it now is a little too banged up to trust. Another lesson learned.:banghead:
 

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You mean this?



Ya I saw it and I should have stayed away from it completely and installed the valve to the left. 70 to 75 degrees will keep you from busting the valve but what they don't tell you is you'll play hell putting air in the tire from that location on the Wing. I learned a lesson for sure. I've got the T ground off now and although the tire is still holding air I'll go ahead and have that valve replaced as the valve in it now is a little too banged up to trust. Another lesson learned.:banghead:
I'm pretty sure he was referring to this: Quoted from the website (this was down near the bottom under the "FITMENT" Q & A.. Really sorry to hear about this for you... Bummer!!!

EXCEPTION: 1988-2000 Honda GL1500 GoldWing & 2001-2007+ Honda GL1800 GoldWing, all years Honda Rune: Not in stock form -- minor modification required. Kudos to Mike at JBJ Cycles for pointing out this issue on the GL-series. On many years, rear valve will need to face left or be installed off-angle (70 - 75° instead of 90°) if installed pointed towards the right.
Honda created the wheels for it's GoldWing series with a T-support for the valve stem to address a valve clearance/collapse issue -- and stupidly enough, put the support to the left side (sidestand-side), so owners can't readily get at their tire valves without placing the bike on the centerstand. Taking a dremel to cut/grind away this "T" support (see picture of T-support here) flush with the rest of the valve seat area will permit installation of our valves, as well as permitting you to face the valve in the opposite direction as stock (i.e. - permitting it to face to the right side, so pressures can easily be checked & air easily added while stopped on the sidestand). If mounting facing the caliper, for many years' models, you must install the valve at an slightly off-angle to prevent it from contacting the caliper (70 - 75° to direction of rotation of the wheel, instead of 90° -- please check clearance before dismounting the wheel to ensure your placement will be feasible (suggest use of a wax pencil to mark the acceptible seating angle).
 

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I got black ones mounted on my new black powder coated wheels and they work great. I had to turn them a little, but accessing them to put air in the tires is no issue. I have them pointing to the right (as your sitting on the bike) for easier access when the bike is on the side stand.

Front



Rear

 

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It's a little hard for me to tell from the pictures. I know you had to angle the back, did you also have to angle the front?

Also, on a scale of 1 to 10, 1 being no impact and 10 being life changing, how much easier would you say it is to check / fill pressure with them pointing to the right?

Thanks!


I got black ones mounted on my new black powder coated wheels and they work great. I had to turn them a little, but accessing them to put air in the tires is no issue. I have them pointing to the right (as your sitting on the bike) for easier access when the bike is on the side stand.
 

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It's a little hard for me to tell from the pictures. I know you had to angle the back, did you also have to angle the front?

Also, on a scale of 1 to 10, 1 being no impact and 10 being life changing, how much easier would you say it is to check / fill pressure with them pointing to the right?

Thanks!
I angled the front about 10 degrees to clear the caliper.

As far as pointing to the right, there is a little "tit" on the OEM wheel to support the plastic support that goes around the stem. With these particular stems, you have to grind that off as shown in this picture IF you want to point them to the left:



By pointing the stem to the other side, you don't have to grind that off. On a scale of 1 to 10...maybe a 6. It's a little easier accessing the stem when the bike is on the side stand since it's leaning the other way.
 
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Discussion Starter #14
I got black ones mounted on my new black powder coated wheels and they work great. I had to turn them a little, but accessing them to put air in the tires is no issue. I have them pointing to the right (as your sitting on the bike) for easier access when the bike is on the side stand.

Front



Rear

I tried that angle on the rear and to the right and was more than happy to get it back to the left again. To hard to put air in it on the right side.
 

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Thanks for the info. I ground my tabs off before taking my rims to the powder coater.

My original intent was to point them to the right. Though with the angles and all I am thinking maybe I will keep them to the left like Rider Steve. Guess I'll have to do some experimenting when my rims get back!
 

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If you hoist the bike on the centerstand before airing up, pointing the valve stems to the port side has no disadvantages.

I have these valve stems (both pointing port side) and love 'em.
 

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Can the new TPMS's that mount on the stems be used with these stems? Thanks Buzz
Just don't.

The systems that mount on the shrader valve's cap are less reliable than your tire. These systems will fail before most people get a lucky nail into their new installed rear tires. Think about it, the valve is designed to hold the pressure, not the stem or the cap.

Try this experiment, unscrew the shrader valve, then quickly place the cap on the stem. I bet your tire will be flat before I finish this sentence...
 

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Just don't.

The systems that mount on the shrader valve's cap are less reliable than your tire. These systems will fail before most people get a lucky nail into their new installed rear tires. Think about it, the valve is designed to hold the pressure, not the stem or the cap.

Try this experiment, unscrew the shrader valve, then quickly place the cap on the stem. I bet your tire will be flat before I finish this sentence...
The caps that have the transmitters ARE designed to hold the air. Mine do an excellent job. JMHO
 

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I think that is his point, though. The valves are supposed to hold the air, that's why it's a valve. The TPMS caps keep the valve in the open position. Lot's of riders have an issue with that.
 

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The point I was trying to make is that the caps that come with the TPMS are specifically designed to hold the air in just like the schrader valve is. It is just a different way of doing it and is not more likely to leak than a schrader valve is. There is actually more substantial sealing surface than on a schrader.

 
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