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Discussion Starter #1
If you disable the ADV does it affect the ABS system and how it will function? I think I might have read something on this site but can't find it again. Thanks in advance for any info.
 

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It might not be a good idea to disable the AD unless you change to a stiffer spring in the forks. With stock weak springs the front end will dive badly when you hit the brakes hard.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
" It might not be a good idea to disable the AD unless you change to a stiffer spring in the forks. With stock weak springs the front end will dive badly when you hit the brakes hard. "

That's what I thought too, so I'm going to put the Progressive springs in too. But I don't really want to disable the AD. Still deciding on that.
 

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" It might not be a good idea to disable the AD unless you change to a stiffer spring in the forks. With stock weak springs the front end will dive badly when you hit the brakes hard. "

That's what I thought too, so I'm going to put the Progressive springs in too. But I don't really want to disable the AD. Still deciding on that.
The following assumes that your ADV is not frozen or stuck.

It really depends on the "bumpiness" of the roads you ride on. In cooler climates, you'll have potholes and patches and only if you brake on them will you have problems. Otherwise, ADV is nice.

If you are in a warmer climate and have asphalt roads, you will likely have wrinkles in the roads where trucks have drug the tar with their wheels as they stop. ADV is unpleasant in those places, but otherwise nice especially on smooth concrete.

I disabled mine because I have holes, patches and wrinkles nearly everywhere so ADV sucks. Also, you will think harder when your left seal starts leaking.
 

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The whole purpose of the ADV is to prevent dive with the soft compliant springs that Honda uses. The two are designed to work in tandem. With a stiffer spring, it just isn't needed, whether it works or not.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The whole purpose of the ADV is to prevent dive with the soft compliant springs that Honda uses. The two are designed to work in tandem. With a stiffer spring, it just isn't needed, whether it works or not.

So if I disable it I won't feel like I am riding on the axel/rigid frame if I run over a small rock? That would be what I'm after.
 

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So if I disable it I won't feel like I am riding on the axel/rigid frame if I run over a small rock? That would be what I'm after.
Well, maybe, and maybe not.

When the ADV is working properly, it has no affect on ride quality. It only kicks in when you hit the brakes.

Some bikes have had the ADV stick, and it is stuck in the activated position at all times. That will make the front end ride very hard.

But before you blame the ADV, test it to make sure that is what is causing the problem. You can even temporarily disable it and take it for a test ride to see if that is the problem you are experiencing.

But I don't think the ADV fails as often as people thinks it does.
 

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You don't need a broken ADV to get a harsh ride on the front end.

If you want to smooth it out, just take a nickel or a quarter and drill out the middle and use it as a spacer between the two halves of the ADV unit.

A cheap fix with a great improvement.

Do a search on this and the other board as much has been written on the subject.

Dive, if any is inconseqential.

This does not disable the ADV entirely but makes it work as it should.

Try it. If you don't like it, just remove it. (YOU WON'T.)
 

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I'll have to disagree with Larry, the AntiDive does function while riding down the road. The AD plunger is pushing down on the valve at all times. This has been discussed on here many times. I discovered a few years ago that by placing a .035 thick "C" shaped washer under the top nut on the plunger assembly you remove the preload on the AD valve and the bike will ride much smoother and the AD will still function as designed.
I would recommend using this method with OEM and Progressive springs. I found there was too much nose dive (i.e. weight transfer) using OEM and progressive springs with the AD completely disabled. When I switched to Traxxion springs I removed the "C" washer and installed a piece of PVC pipe between the plunger and valve bodies to completely disable the AD and found the amount of dive was acceptable. I now have the full Traxxion AK20 and that is definitely the best.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Great info you guys have given and it is really appreciated. After reading your posts I will put the Progressive springs in and disable the ADV and run with that for awhile. I'm putting the All-Balls bearings in too so I thought I would change the front forks. I am also deciding if I should put the Progressive shock spring in the back while I'm at it. The front end harshness is what I feel most when I ride. I will first check to see if the ADV is stuck or sticking but it's an 08 with only 5K on it so I just thought it was working ok or as designed. I'm going with Progressive because of cost right now. This is my first GoldWing and have been riding Harley's until this bike, it's just the front end on the Wing is a lot harder then what I would like. Anyway thanks again for all your help and will post again when I get this done and advise on what I found out.
 

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Cal, if your ADV is operating without hitting your brakes, then there is something wrong with it. Take a look at how the valve actuates and you will see this.

Yes, this has been discussed at length over the years, and of all the misinformation on this website, there is probably no discussion that involves more inaccuracies than the anti-dive system.

I don't expect you to just believe me, so I looked up the info in the service manual. There is a technical discussion about the operation of the valve in the manual. The text that follows is directly from the manual.
BRAKE SERVO-PRESSURE SENSING ANTI-DIVE SYSTEM
This motorcycle is equipped with the Linked Brake System (LBS). This system operates the anti-dive system on the left
front fork by utilizing fluid pressure generated in the secondary master cylinder.
The secondary master cylinder responds to braking forces generated by the lever and/or pedal. When either brake is
applied, the plunger is pushed by pressure from the secondary master cylinder and the anti-dive piston valve in the fork oil
passage moves to block the passage. As the flow of the fork fluid is reduced by movement of the piston valve, the system
reduces compression of the front fork and thereby controls the nose dive of the vehicle.
If you have anything else that is activating your ADV other than the brakes, you have something wrong with your bike, because its only purpose in life is to control front end dive during heavy braking.
 

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Larry

Maybe the AD should only work when the brakes are applied. However the reality is that is not the case. Every single 1800 I have checked and worked on, the plunger assembly depresses the AD valve between .020” & .025" when at rest with the plunger fully retracted. You can check this by separating the plunger from the ADV and note that the two will not mate without pressure down on the plunger assembly. This small movement of the AD valve does partially restrict flow of fork fluid through the ADV. By placing a .035 spacer under the top nut on the plunger this preload is removed while still allowing the ADV to function as it should. This allows the front suspension to absorb high speed bumps much better. Many have added the washer and can attest to the handling improvements including Fred H.

Also the statement in the manual is not quite accurate. The ADV plunger is activated directly by fluid from the rear brake and indirectly by use of the brake lever by fluid from the secondary master that is generated by the upward movement of the left brake caliper. The secondary master cylinder has nothing to do with activation of the ADV when using the rear brake only.
 

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When I installed my Progressive front springs I disabled the anti-dive valve. The setup rode nicer than stock. However, a couple times when I stopped hard the front end dove farther than I liked...especially 2-up. I enabled the anti-dive valve for a comparison. The ride was unchanged but the front end wouldn't dive under a hard stop. I continued to keep the anti-dive valve enabled until I changed to a Traxxion suspension.
 

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I understand what you are thinking now. I believe you are mistaking that preload as meaning that the ADV is partially engaged, which I don't agree with. Designing in a certain amount of preload merely enables the ADV to react faster. But that is probably an argument that won't be easily resolved or proven either way.

As far as the mistake in the description, the description is accurate. Since both the front and rear brake levers will operate the left front caliper because of the Linked Brake System, either one will indeed cause that caliper to pivot and press the plunger to activate the secondary master cylinder and operate the ADV. They should have expanded the description a bit more, but it is correct as written. It is the circuit diagram that Honda uses that has a mistake in it. There is no need to have a direct connection to the rear brake. It would be redundant.
 

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I will vote with Larry on this one. I used a .084 hardened chrome Harley head washer to disable my ADV. I've had the ADV mounted OEM style active and completely off the plunger mounted with a zip tie and I noticed no difference in the front end - unless I was braking. I refer to my earlier post. Bumpy roads and ADV suck big time. Only reason I didn't just leave it zip tied is because I preferred to keep road splooge from getting inside where the mating surfaces are. I had the washer in my bag of tricks already so it was a free fix. I have Progressive springs. You will find it difficult to bottom Progressive springs (a note for the OP).

The blue secondary shown is activated with anything more than a gentle push on the pedal.


 

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Larry
If you disassemble an ADV you will see that any movement of the spool in the ADV does in fact restrict flow even .020". I have probably repaired 20 AD plungers and every bike that I have installed the washer to remove the preload the riders have noticed the difference in ride.
Brake fliud is applied to the AD plunger directly from the rear brake and not from the secondary master when appling the rear brake. This is why the AD plunger is one of the bleed points for the rear brake.

Roger Out
 
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