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Discussion Starter #1
I spent some time yesterday digging into what the dealer's mechanic did on my bike. One thing he did was cross thread a shoulder bolt. On the rider's side of the airbag there are supports that are used to hold the side shelter panels on. Unfortunately the bolt is somewhat hard to get to because it is under the airbag strap. You must be very careful when putting in the bolt or it will cross thread. I got one of them out successfully, but the other one broke off. Apparently the guy used some form of power tool to start the bolt and he did not pay any attention to the fact that it was much too hard to turn. Unfortunately my skill level when it comes to removing broken bolts is quite low. My question is, what would be the best way to approach this? Should I try to drill it out and then run a tap through it to clean out the threads? Is there a better way? The bolt that that broke is a 6 mm shoulder bolt.

Suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
taking it back

You probably should have taken it back to the dealer that messed things up the very first day !
Maybe, but I was concerned that there were things wrong I was not seeing initially. Frankly, if they were willing to come get the bike, take it back to their shop, fix it and then return the bike to me at no charge, I would not let them do it. What is this guy going to break on his second try?
 

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I think your plan is the correct one. Success will depend on you centre punching bang on centre of the stuck screw. If you don't, you'll hit the thread on one side while drilling and leave little crescents of thread in the hole which you'll need to dig out.

It's trickier to do than you might think because when you view the broken end you're looking at the thread on one side but the thread is hidden on the other side because it's screwed in. You need to allow for that. A M6 thread has a 5mm drill size for tapping so you need to be over from the broken thread end by half a millimetre extra. It looks way off centre to the eye. Your first drill hole is the critical one, use a small diameter, sharp drill or it'll walk sideways a little.

Ignore anyone who says use an easyout, it won't work and you'll end up with a hardened steel broken piece jammed in the hole.

Good luck with it.
 

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If you can get to the broken end of the screw (bolt) try to dress the end flat to make it easier to get on the center on the screw, I would invest in an Automatic center punch makes it easier to get on the center and not have to worry about it moving before you strike the punch with your hammer. You may also want to try using a left handed drill bit, often when you use those the screw will back out as you are drilling.
https://www.harborfreight.com/spring-loaded-center-punch-621.html
 

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Ignore anyone who says use an easyout, it won't work and you'll end up with a hardened steel broken piece jammed in the hole.
I agree, don't use an Easy Out. They cause more problems than they fix, especially on small bolts.

Also, I'm not exactly sure where this bolt is located that you are referring to, but if the gas tank is underneath it, you're going to have to be real careful you don't drill through the bolt and right into the gas tank. Put a steel plate behind if you can so you don't ruin your gas tank.
 

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IF you are going to drill it, use a left handed drill bit (counter clockwise). The broken threaded shank that remains may spin out with the bit. Like Fred said about the fuel tank, there are lots of things in there you could damage, slow and calm and steady are your friends.

prs
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Remove airbag

I agree, don't use an Easy Out. They cause more problems than they fix, especially on small bolts.

Also, I'm not exactly sure where this bolt is located that you are referring to, but if the gas tank is underneath it, you're going to have to be real careful you don't drill through the bolt and right into the gas tank. Put a steel plate behind if you can so you don't ruin your gas tank.
I don't think I have any shot at all of getting it repaired without removing the airbag assembly. I don't know how I would get it drilled out accurately enough or even get it correctly center punched with it mounted on the bike. BTW: It is right over the gas tank.

The bolt is number 41 on this page:
https://www.partzilla.com/catalog/honda/motorcycle/2009/gl1800-8a-gold-wing/shelter-gl1800-06-airbag
 

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I spent some time yesterday digging into what the dealer's mechanic did on my bike. One thing he did was cross thread a shoulder bolt. On the rider's side of the airbag there are supports that are used to hold the side shelter panels on. Unfortunately the bolt is somewhat hard to get to because it is under the airbag strap. You must be very careful when putting in the bolt or it will cross thread. I got one of them out successfully, but the other one broke off. Apparently the guy used some form of power tool to start the bolt and he did not pay any attention to the fact that it was much too hard to turn. Unfortunately my skill level when it comes to removing broken bolts is quite low. My question is, what would be the best way to approach this? Should I try to drill it out and then run a tap through it to clean out the threads? Is there a better way? The bolt that that broke is a 6 mm shoulder bolt.

Suggestions?
Can you post a picture of the bolt and where it was at ???
 

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If there are any threads showing, thread a nut on them, a coupling nut is even better as it will help center your drill bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Another idea

The bracket actually has what appears to be a nut welded onto the back side of the bracket. I was wondering how crazy it would be to try and get the nut off with something like a Dremel cutting wheel and then attach the replacement with JB Weld or something similar.
 

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If you can get to the broken end of the screw (bolt) try to dress the end flat to make it easier to get on the center on the screw, I would invest in an Automatic center punch makes it easier to get on the center and not have to worry about it moving before you strike the punch with your hammer. You may also want to try using a left handed drill bit, often when you use those the screw will back out as you are drilling.
https://www.harborfreight.com/spring-loaded-center-punch-621.html
I never even knew such a center punch existed ! Sounds like the perfect tool I could have used a bunch of times last week while installing a steel roof. I will definitely be looking for them next trip to Harbor Freight !
 

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The bracket actually has what appears to be a nut welded onto the back side of the bracket. I was wondering how crazy it would be to try and get the nut off with something like a Dremel cutting wheel and then attach the replacement with JB Weld or something similar.

If you can remove the bracket and get it on a bench, it will make it much easier and you won't have to worry about hitting the gas tank. As Fred said, if you can't remove it, put a piece of steel on the back side if you drill so you don't hit the tank.


To fix it, I see 3 options...
1. drill at 5mm and re-tap at 6mm (already discussed a bunch so I'll assume that option is known.
2. use a time-sert or helicoil. allows you to over drill the hole a bit and then put in good threads afterwards. Perfect drilling isn't as necessary but you'll have to buy the time-sert or helicoil pieces to make it work.
3. grind off the nut and weld another one back on or jbweld (not recommended but might work if you never really tighten it much)




Personally, I'd probably try option 1 and then go to option 3 if option 1 didn't work. (then again...I have a welder.... if I didn't or didn't have access to one, I'd probably try option 1 and then go to option 2 if it didn't work)
 

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I don't think I have any shot at all of getting it repaired without removing the airbag assembly. I don't know how I would get it drilled out accurately enough or even get it correctly center punched with it mounted on the bike. BTW: It is right over the gas tank.

The bolt is number 41 on this page:
https://www.partzilla.com/catalog/honda/motorcycle/2009/gl1800-8a-gold-wing/shelter-gl1800-06-airbag

I'm trying to remember what those bolts go into on the Air Bag bikes. It may simply be a nut plate. If that is the case, you should be able to just remove the nut plate and replace it with a new one.
 

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It looks like the rear two bolts go into nut plates that are pushed onto the plastic tabs of the top shelter. I'm not sure about the front two. On non-air bag bikes, all four go into nut plates. I think the air bag bike may be the same, but it's been a while since I worked on one.


If it is a nut plate you should be able to simply spread (bend) the nut plate open and then replace it with a new one.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Photos

It is definitely not a nut plate. What I'm wondering is if the nut can be removed. Here is a couple of photos:

This is just the broken off bolt where it normally sits under the shelter tabs


This is what it looks like under the airbag bracket.


This is a look at the "good" nut. I think it is going to have to be fixed too. It looks pretty bad in real life.
 
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