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I have a 2007 ABS and have a question on downshifting when coming to a stop. I usually wait until I am under 10 or 15 miles an hour...and then I somewhat rapidly shift down through the gears until I get to 1st. Is that OK?

Is there a correct way...that prevents unnecessary wear and tear on the transmission?
 

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IronMan
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To each his own. I usually downshift when coming up to stop or slow down when rpms get below 3000 ya burp the gas to bring up rpms when you downshift and match the gas with motor should be nice and smooth . No jerky motion. No stress on drivetrain or clutch that way and saves your brakes .
 

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The longer you ride the easier it gets. If when you shift down and you leave a black mark on the road, you shifted too soon. If you start out and the bike dies, you forgot to shift down. In either case you do not ruin the transmission. By the time you reach 5000 miles you should master the shifting challenge. Unless I am coming to a stop and I am in 5th gear I usually don't shift down. At stop, I shift to 1st for the moving ahead. When you forget to shift down at start up you must downshift real fast.
 

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I know a lot of people that have strong, and very specific opinions about this. But like many things, I don't think there is, or should be, any hard fast rule here. IMO, your downshifting should be determined on what allows you to maintain the best control over your bike at all times, without unnecessarily increasing wear on the bike. To a certain degree, this can vary for everyone, because it is determined by your riding technique and comfort level.

That means that your downshifting technique should vary based on the situation. Coming to a gradual stop at a light will be very different than an emergency stop, or reducing speed while riding aggressively in the twisties.

While approaching a stoplight, I will generally downshift as speed decreases so that I can match my speed with the proper gear, but I won't necessarily let the clutch out. Engine braking provides good control, but I don't use it unless I need it. Brake pads are far cheaper than clutches.

There are a couple of things to consider when it comes to rapidly downshifting through multiple gears at the last minute. First, it's just harder to do. A motorcycle transmission doesn't like downshifting from 5th gear at 10 mph. Second, if an emergency were to pop up, you will likely be in the wrong gear, preventing you from quickly reacting to accelerate away from the danger. Your throttle can be just as important as your brakes in an emergency.
 

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Is that OK?

Is there a correct way...that prevents unnecessary wear and tear on the transmission?
If you downshift that way, you are not damaging the transmission.
 

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I'm a "coaster". Like Sparky stated - I downshift to the speed / gear ratio for the same reasons he stated - if you're going to slow for 5th gear you're going to "lug" on accelerating.

On the other note - I tap my brakes constantly during a planned stop to at least give the vehicle behind me some attention getting awareness that I am stopping or slowing down. As I slow more I extend the braking "light" process.
 

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I have a 2007 ABS and have a question on downshifting when coming to a stop. I usually wait until I am under 10 or 15 miles an hour...and then I somewhat rapidly shift down through the gears until I get to 1st. Is that OK?

Is there a correct way...that prevents unnecessary wear and tear on the transmission?
Dont over think it. I would down shift just as you go through the gears as you come up you can wait till you get below 2500 to rpm or lower when you get to the red light I usually double clutch throttle just a little to keep them plates spinning makes it easier to switch cleaner
I may add you really need to stay above 2250 rpm to keep from lugging the motor.
 

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I down shift as I slow down so I am always in the proper gear to apply power to adjust for the needs of the situation. For Instance if the car behind me is about to rear-end me at 35 mph while I am slowing down for a red light or slowed traffic , I am in the correct gear to accelerate and use the exit that I have built to handle the situation. This is the same reason when I am stopped at a redlight I never center on the car in front of me, I am always at the extreme of one side or the other with an escape path chosen and my bike in gear with the clutch pulled in while stopped and watching my mirrors for the car that we be the one behind me.
 

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After years and years of riding its not something that I even think about. But when slowing down to come to a stop I usually downshift and use engine braking, with our without using the brakes as well until just before stopped when I always use the brakes (or at least one brake). Coasting to a stop with the clutch pulled in pretty much leaves you without any real control of the bike so I don;t recommend that. And as to brake pads being cheaper than a clutch, I would say that in my 35 years of riding I have never replaced a clutch. Maybe that's because I have never held onto a bike for more than 5 or 6 years and maybe 30,000 miles or so, but while I've replaced brake pads the original clutch has always still worked fine.

Sometimes when slowing down for a stop I gently use the brakes as well as downshifting, but primarily to activate my brake lights to make sure the vehicle behind me notices that I am slowing down. But much of the slowing down is still due to the downshifting.
 
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Its a Goldwing, not a log truck. Downshifting is not critical to do all through the gears down to first. I usually will downshift from fifth to fourth and add some braking to the mix. Prior to stopping I pull in the clutch and downshift to the gear I will be starting out in, second gear in my case 90% of the time.
 

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I usually try to be in a low enough gear that if traffic changed the bike could continue driving without the needing to downshift immediately.

Meaning I keep it in a low enough gear that it won't 'lug' if the plan changes to driving instead of slowing.
 

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I know a lot of people that have strong, and very specific opinions about this. But like many things, I don't think there is, or should be, any hard fast rule here. IMO, your downshifting should be determined on what allows you to maintain the best control over your bike at all times, without unnecessarily increasing wear on the bike. To a certain degree, this can vary for everyone, because it is determined by your riding technique and comfort level.

That means that your downshifting technique should vary based on the situation. Coming to a gradual stop at a light will be very different than an emergency stop, or reducing speed while riding aggressively in the twisties.

While approaching a stoplight, I will generally downshift as speed decreases so that I can match my speed with the proper gear, but I won't necessarily let the clutch out. Engine braking provides good control, but I don't use it unless I need it. Brake pads are far cheaper than clutches.

There are a couple of things to consider when it comes to rapidly downshifting through multiple gears at the last minute. First, it's just harder to do. A motorcycle transmission doesn't like downshifting from 5th gear at 10 mph. Second, if an emergency were to pop up, you will likely be in the wrong gear, preventing you from quickly reacting to accelerate away from the danger. Your throttle can be just as important as your brakes in an emergency.
Perfect, just the way I would have said it, if I could have thought of it.
 

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When slowing down I try to keep the rpms to any where from 2200 to 3000. In other words, you should be ready to be on the gas in the power range when ever possible. When I know I will be taking a 90 degree turn to go onto another street, I shift till in second gear, then I can accelerate through the turn.
 

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I have a 2007 ABS and have a question on downshifting when coming to a stop. I usually wait until I am under 10 or 15 miles an hour...and then I somewhat rapidly shift down through the gears until I get to 1st. Is that OK?
What you're doing is just fine. Don't overthink this!!


Rayjoe
 

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I must have a different motor. I don't need 2000 or more rpms to be able to accelerate without lugging the engine. The bike has over 100 ft/lbs of [email protected] 1500 rpms. l usually downshift w/o releasing the clutch. I just try to keep the gear ratio appropriate to my speed, so if I need to take some action I can. Now if I'm not coming to a stop, then I let out the clutch in the right gear for the anticipated speed.

Richard
 

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IronMan
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i know a lot of people that have strong, and very specific opinions about this. But like many things, i don't think there is, or should be, any hard fast rule here. Imo, your downshifting should be determined on what allows you to maintain the best control over your bike at all times, without unnecessarily increasing wear on the bike. To a certain degree, this can vary for everyone, because it is determined by your riding technique and comfort level.

That means that your downshifting technique should vary based on the situation. Coming to a gradual stop at a light will be very different than an emergency stop, or reducing speed while riding aggressively in the twisties.

While approaching a stoplight, i will generally downshift as speed decreases so that i can match my speed with the proper gear, but i won't necessarily let the clutch out. Engine braking provides good control, but i don't use it unless i need it. Brake pads are far cheaper than clutches.

There are a couple of things to consider when it comes to rapidly downshifting through multiple gears at the last minute. First, it's just harder to do. A motorcycle transmission doesn't like downshifting from 5th gear at 10 mph. Second, if an emergency were to pop up, you will likely be in the wrong gear, preventing you from quickly reacting to accelerate away from the danger. Your throttle can be just as important as your brakes in an emergency.
wet clutch system and if you match engine speed ( pratice ) with wheel speed no wear on clutch . Used to drive a truck when i was younger . Learn real fast . As i said above. To each his own
 
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IronMan
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i must have a different motor. I don't need 2000 or more rpms to be able to accelerate without lugging the engine. The bike has over 100 ft/lbs of [email protected] 1500 rpms. L usually downshift w/o releasing the clutch. I just try to keep the gear ratio appropriate to my speed, so if i need to take some action i can. Now if i'm not coming to a stop, then i let out the clutch in the right gear for the anticipated speed.

Richard
to me big difference in power (speed) at 3000 rpm than 2000 if in traffic ride in 3 or above. Sometimes "ya need to move "
 

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I often downshift not only when coming to a stop, but also when riding up an incline, down a steep incline or approaching a corner or curve.

The only time a clutch is subject to wear is when it is partially engaged, as when doing slow speed maneuvers or holding the bike on an incline. A wet clutch helps to minimize that wear.
 
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