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Something I have noticed about non-OEM brake pads. When initially applied, they seem to grab better.

On bike that come in for repair with aftermarket pads, their ADV engages more often and quicker because of a better initial grab rocking the LF caliper up. What I mean is the ADV is less likely to engage when using the front brake with OEM pads as when using the front brake on ones with aftermarket pad. That equates to a harsher ride more often for Wings using aftermarket pads when braking ... I'm just saying for anyone who want to read !!!
 

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Something I have noticed about non-OEM brake pads. When initially applied, they seem to grab better.

On bike that come in for repair with aftermarket pads, their ADV engages more often and quicker because of a better initial grab rocking the LF caliper up. What I mean is the ADV is less likely to engage when using the front brake with OEM pads as when using the front brake on ones with aftermarket pad. That equates to a harsher ride more often for Wings using aftermarket pads when braking ... I'm just saying for anyone who want to read !!!
Greg I normally read most of your post with the thought of learning something, and I most often, I do, but this time you’re so far off base... In general you may be right but not all aftermarket brakes are equal...

If you hadn’t linked all aftermarket brakes together I might have believed what you’re saying, but I have over 40,000+ miles on the aftermarket brakes I’m now using and have had no indications of a harsh ride of any kind or any premature rotor wear...

I have tested three different types of brakes, one OEM and two aftermarket, the only big difference I can find so far is the OEMs are very good but will fade with hard enough use and very dirty, one aftermarket was better at stopping but also very dirty as the OEMs are, the third and last aftermarket set stopped better than all the others and is very clean with no signs of fading going down long twisty hills (like some of the mountains in CO, or playing hard in the twisties of the Appalachians) at speeds...

Could it possible be that the set you’re referring to do this??? Probably they do... But please don’t link all aftermarket breaks into the same bracket...
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.. with aftermarket pads, their ADV engages more
..but I have over 40,000+ miles on the aftermarket brakes
I’m now using and have had no indications of a harsh ride of any kind or any..
Dick,
read his post again.
What he is describing does not apply to "us".
He talked about the effect of "grabbier" pads on the ADV.
.. we don't have the ADV in the loop anymore.

Dennis
 
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True not all pads are equal and this applies to OEM. Of course Honda does not make brake pads nor do they make oil or many other products they brand.
So in a sense all brake pads are aftermarket even OEM and they are all different.
Case in point I recently replaced the rear pad on my Valk with a pair of Honda OEM. Stopping power was reduced by at least 50% over what was there previously, I tried a set I purchased from Dennis Kirk which turned out to be identical to the OEM pad - poor.
Upon some good advice I purchased a new set from JC Whitney and now things are back to normal.
Biggest issue was the material on OEM and DK was just to hard and the JC product was much softer which means they will not last as long but at least now I can stop.
It's kind of like tires, once you find a product that works just stick with that.
 

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Dick,
read his post again.
What he is describing does not apply to "us".
He talked about the effect of "grabbier" pads on the ADV.
.. we don't have the ADV in the loop anymore.

Dennis
You’re right Dennis, in what he’s saying and it may be true to some extent with some aftermarket pads??? :shrug: :shrug: :shrug:

I had my aftermarket pads on a little over 25,000 miles before I got my ADV disabled, I now have over 40,000+ on them and there still half there...

I didn’t have the grabbing probably problems he’s talking about before either... :shrug: :shrug:

I can't explain it, so it must be not all are aftermarket pads are equal???
.
 

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...
Upon some good advice I purchased a new set from JC Whitney and now things are back to normal.
Biggest issue was the material on OEM and DK was just to hard and the JC product was much softer which means they will not last as long but at least now I can stop.
...
Storm, are you able to determine who made the pads for JC Whitney?

I can attest what you are saying about soft and hard pads. I have an extra firm wire wheel on a 1 hp electric motor I use to clean rust off of steel. I thought that I would 'dress' the pads to use on a different set of brake rotors (I have more than one front wheel). When that spinning wire wheel made contact with the pads I am currently using, poof! That light touch cost me many thousands of miles of brake pad service. I was amazed how soft they were. These are the Traxxion Vesrah High Performance pads. \

So, just for fun, I tried another brake pad brand. EBC. These were off my old GL1200 and it could withstand longer contact against the wire wheel. I had these brakes on the 1200, and I can attest, these weren't the most impressive brakes

Still on the search for another set of the Traxxion flavor of front pads. Found one set on the for sale board. Now, to find another.

As to the OP, no anti-dive here either, so I can't comment. Theory makes sense tho.
 

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From reports we read here, I figure all non OE brake pads are not created equal. My only experience is with OE and the special Traxxion version of Versa aftermarket pads. I find those to be very similar in functon, but TX/Versa seem to have a longer service life and more even wear. I did not expect that.

I think it is logical for grippier front pads to activate the left caliper's secondary master quicker and more often if the operator appies the same input pressure. But, on the other hand, I would think the operator would instinctively use less pressure with better gripping pads since he/she would be calibrating the input pressure by monitoring the desired result, sort of instinctive.

prs
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You guys are right about clumping aftermarket pads into one catigory. I really should be refering to the pads that I see. I think they all installed by an independent repair place near me and have no idea what brand they are.

On the ones that I see, once I remove the LF pads and install OEM pads, it takes much harder hand brake pressure to get the LF rotor to raise and apply the ADV. I noticed it a couple of years ago and could never figure out why some ADV's engage so quickly and other not so fast. I just finally put it all together. The same condition occures even after the new OEMs are broken in. Sorry I don't know the brand that I am looking at, but wanted to point out that a harsher ride would result.

Thanks "the wva cardinal" for pointing that out and do appricaite you all for reading my posts and hope to see everyone at WingDing where my chapter gets to sit front row for earning International Chapter of the Year. I'll be there with them.
 

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From reports we read here, I figure all non OE brake pads are not created equal. My only experience is with OE and the special Traxxion version of Versa aftermarket pads. I find those to be very similar in functon, but TX/Versa seem to have a longer service life and more even wear. I did not expect that.

I think it is logical for grippier front pads to activate the left caliper's secondary master quicker and more often if the operator appies the same input pressure. But, on the other hand, I would think the operator would instinctively use less pressure with better gripping pads since he/she would be calibrating the input pressure by monitoring the desired result, sort of instinctive.

prs
You guys are right about clumping aftermarket pads into one catigory. I really should be refering to the pads that I see. I think they all installed by an independent repair place near me and have no idea what brand they are.

On the ones that I see, once I remove the LF pads and install OEM pads, it takes much harder hand brake pressure to get the LF rotor to raise and apply the ADV. I noticed it a couple of years ago and could never figure out why some ADV's engage so quickly and other not so fast. I just finally put it all together. The same condition occures even after the new OEMs are broken in. Sorry I don't know the brand that I am looking at, but wanted to point out that a harsher ride would result.

Thanks "the wva cardinal" for pointing that out and do appricaite you all for reading my posts and hope to see everyone at WingDing where my chapter gets to sit front row for earning International Chapter of the Year. I'll be there with them.
Greg, I honestly never got or felt the harsher ride your talking about, but there again I never took into account, I may have been doing what PRS is talking about and compensating for the better braking with lighter pressure on the brake handle and didn’t even realize I was doing it because the bike was coming down from speeds as I wanted it to do??? :thumbup: :thumbup:
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DICK: I am another one who would be interested in knowing the brand of the 2nd set of aftermarket pads you talked about that lasted longer and worked better than OEMs.
 

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I Also would like to know what these pads are
 

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I changed my front pads at 35K and switched to Vesrah pads which I am very pleased with. They are quiet, much less dust than OEM and have great stopping power. I checked them the other day and at 19K have lots of pad left. I'm sticking with them for the next change.

Fred
 

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OEM/After market pads,what brand acts like Poli grip better.Take them dam pads out and toss them.Ask 211 he'll tell you all they do is add unsprung weight to the bike,Why he just drags his feet in the corners to slow down.:thumbup:

Now don't get me started on a good pair of boots with long lasting tread.:eek:4:
 

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Greetings!

If memory serves, there are two basic kinds of brake pad types out there: sintered and organic. The sintered ones use a fused metallic powder as the basic pad material and the organic ones use a polymer like Kevlar as the basic pad material.

I have never compared the two directly, but it would not surprise me at all if one kind seemed 'grabbier' than the other. So when one says that the non-oem pads grab more I think that it matters as to which kind of pads they are.
 

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just squeeze the lever a little harder like your going down a hill
 

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What brake aftermarket brake pads do you reccommend?
thanks
Tracy

Greg I normally read most of your post with the thought of learning something, and I most often, I do, but this time you’re so far off base... In general you may be right but not all aftermarket brakes are equal...

If you hadn’t linked all aftermarket brakes together I might have believed what you’re saying, but I have over 40,000+ miles on the aftermarket brakes I’m now using and have had no indications of a harsh ride of any kind or any premature rotor wear...

I have tested three different types of brakes, one OEM and two aftermarket, the only big difference I can find so far is the OEMs are very good but will fade with hard enough use and very dirty, one aftermarket was better at stopping but also very dirty as the OEMs are, the third and last aftermarket set stopped better than all the others and is very clean with no signs of fading going down long twisty hills (like some of the mountains in CO, or playing hard in the twisties of the Appalachians) at speeds...

Could it possible be that the set you’re referring to do this??? Probably they do... But please don’t link all aftermarket breaks into the same bracket...
.
 

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.....I would think the operator would instinctively use less pressure with better gripping pads since he/she would be calibrating the input pressure by monitoring the desired result, sort of instinctive.

prs
Similar to adjusting one's speed for curves so that one keeps the bike typically at the most comfortable lean angle.

just squeeze the lever a little harder like your going down a hill
Doing that doesn't help if you have brake fade. That simply won't work.

Why remove Anti-dive valve?
On bumpy roads, a "locked" fork can knock your teeth out with excessive jarring when stopping. This is most common where roads are subject to freeze/thaw or heavy truck traffic at stops on summer hot macadam which ripples. Though, bumpy roads occur everywhere.
 
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Why remove Anti-dive valve?
Careful here - according to the "experts" if you disable the valve you have to upgrade the springs, shocks and add fuel stabilizer.

Of course that's just an "expert" opinion ;)

ex = has been
spert = drip under presssure
 
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