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I just bought a nice DeWalt 30-gallon air compressor and the instructions say I need to open the drain valve at the end of each day. I thought I could leave the tank charged to fill my Goldwing tires (motorcycle tie-in for the forum) on a moment's notice (i.e. quickly). I know many of you have compressors. Can I ignore this and leave it charged or is this to be religiously followed? Just for info, it's in a secure area with no dangerous issues to contend with (gasoline, oil, structures, children, etc.). Any comments would be appreciated...
 

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Draining the air also purges the moisture in the system. Start doing it and you will be suprised how much there is
 

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You need to drain the condensate every couple months if you use it regularly. That recommendation is complete nonsense.
 

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leave it charged and drain the water off every few months.
 

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quicker air

Make it easier on yourself and pick up a couple 1/4" fittings,(could be 3/8"), a ball valve, and pipe at a hardware and plumb the drain so you can open it without getting down on the floor. A compressor will create a lot of condensate and rust in the tank. The 60 gal. unit in my shop will make about 10 gallons on an average day.
 

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I just bought a nice DeWalt 30-gallon air compressor and the instructions say I need to open the drain valve at the end of each day. ...
What they mean is to open the drain valve momentarily to release any water that may have accumulated in the bottom of the tank. When it's mostly air coming out, close the valve; you're done. Takes about three seconds.
 

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The reason it is recommended to drain the tank on a daily basis is to remove the moisture thereby reducing the internal corrosion (rust) of the pressure vessel which can compromise the tank's ability to safely hold the pressure. Typically, those tanks are not internally painted or protected. It is bare steel, and it rusts fairly quickly.

Look at the non drainable portable air tanks. Typically you will see a "destroy" date five years after the tank was manufactured because the condensed water cannot be drained out.

Crack the drain valve on your tank momentarily on daily basis to remove any moisture and it will last a long time. :doorag:
 

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If you were running air tools all day long, you would build up moisture in the tank and need to drain it every day. If you only use it a little bit, then you can figure out much less often you need to purge the moisture from the tank.
 

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Get yourself a little ball valve and attach a hose to it at the drain. Whenever you go out to fill the tires, crack the ball valve to release the water. It is simply to keep your receiver tank from rusting out.
 

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I drain mine after using it for extended periods, especially on the humid summer days. It is also a good idea to drain it until no more water comes out right before temps go below freezing to keep water out of your drain & from turning to ice. As far as leaving the tank charged, there are people on another board I belong to that have left their compressors charged since the 70's & still have the same one. I NEVER let all the air out of mine, stop as soon as you don't see any more water come out
 

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I've had mine rust out after a year. Guess what I didn't do regularly!
Tanks aren't cheap.
 

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Ive got a electric tank drain on the bottom of my tank along with a water trap at the out put of my tank. Ive got a IR 60 gallon unit so I dont leave it on 24/7 but when I need air I can have it at a moments notice. For my daily quick need air supply ive got a small Porter Cable unit that i leave energized at all times.
 

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What they mean is to open the drain valve momentarily to release any water that may have accumulated in the bottom of the tank. When it's mostly air coming out, close the valve; you're done. Takes about three seconds.
I agree. If you use it daily, drain it (called "blow down" onboard ships) daily. Unless it has an auto drain valve. Then blow it down weekly. If it runs a lot (like, when painting) on a humid day, do it every few hours.
 

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I installed and auto drain valve on mine, every time the compressor turns off it kicks the valve open for a second then shuts it. No worries here...

More info here...
http://www.paragoncode.com/shop/compressor/
 

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If you open the drain and get no moisture, you are draining more often than you need to.

Drain frequency is a function of how much the compressor is running and how much moisture (humidity) is in the air.
 

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I ditto everything previously mentioned. I worked in power plants for 35 years, and blowdown of each and every air storage tanks was done once per shift.

Failure to remove moisture can be catastrophic. I've seen a tank blown completely through the ceiling when it failed at the rusty bottom.
 
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