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Haven't been on for a couple of days, and WOW everything has changed. Hi to everyone.

I will start planning a trip to Alaska, which I hope to take next year, finances and work permitting. I want to go from the St. Louis area to as far North as possible on a wing or perhaps a BMW 1150GS.

I would like to know your main sources used in your planning, anything you may have done different, best time to travel, weather, clothing, hotels, camping, gas, etc. Is wildlife an issue? What should I expect cost wise. This should give me something to do this winter.

Thanks in advance. :D
 

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Hello Bill,
I lived in Alaska 44 years until moving to Michigan. Been over the Alcan many times. The highway is pretty good traveling, mostly paved with some construction. You can probably count on about 100 miles of construction at any time. Easy haul on a touring bike. Plenty of gas stations unless you head to the outlying areas off the main highway. Get a copy of "The Milepost" to plan your stops. Many "roadhouses" that are sparce on accomodations. Stop early unless you want to camp. When they are full, they are full. Some big game on the road, bears, moose, sheep, etc. Not as bad as the deer in the states but the moose can suprise you.
As far as going north, you can ride all the way to the Arctic Ocean on the Haul Road to Kuparuk. It used to be a private road and you had to get a permit. Don't know anymore.
If you get to Alaska, head south to Anchorage and points south. Beautiful vistas all along the way. Coming back, take the Parks Highway to Fairbanks and plan to spend a day at Denali National Park (Mt. McKinley). There's also white water rafting near the park that is fantastic.
South of Anchorage, stop at Girdwood and head up into the hills toward Alyeska ski resort. Before you get to the resort there is a gourmet Cajun restaurant called the Double Muskie. Then take the gondola from the Alyeska Prince Hotel up the mountain Beautiful view..take the camera.
There's lots more but don't miss this trip. You'll remember it forever.
Maybe I'll tag along with you.
 

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Planning trip to Alaska

Hello Bill you can have a lot of fun this winter cruising the net and the cycle message boards looking for stuff on Alaska just use your search engine here and there and you will find a lot of stories and pictures on trips to Alaska. I've been there and done that in the last year. :D

Hey that edit button works great. :beer3:
 

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Alaska Trip

Bill, I've often thought I would love to ride to Alaska. I have a 2002 GL1800. If you decide to make the trip, I may be interested in joining you. I like to camp but hotels are OK also. I'm retired so time is not a big problem. I live in Shelbyville, Ky which is only 4 hours from St. Louis. Keep in Touch. SLIDE
 

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I drove the Al-Can (in a cage :( ) a couple of months ago. Watch the speed limits. The road is frequently winding and hilly and you need to leave time to react in the case of animals (living or dead) on the roads. There are also numerous "falling rock" zones. Again, you need to watch the road closely and leave time to react to debris on the road.

For the above reasons (as well as for sightseeing), I avoided driving at night. The scenery is beautiful and you don't want to miss any of it by driving at night. I tried to stop at dusk and get on the road again at daybreak.

Also, be aware that those who drive the road frequently (especially the truckers) will not appreciate the fact that you're rubber-necking at all the beautiful scenery while they're trying to get from one place to another as fast as possible. If you get someone riding your bumper try to find a place to pull over and let them pass rather than speeding-up to please them. When you're driving the road for the first time you don't want be speeding. The road can be tricky and the unpaved construction zones can be tough on a two-wheeler.

Gas, food and lodging will be much more expensive up there than in the lower 48--stuff your saddle bags with cash. (Major credit cards are accepted at most places along the way, also. Most of your gasoline credit cards from the lower 48 will be useless however.)

I didn't stop at the Liard Hot Springs (near milepost 497) and was told later that I had made a mistake by not doing so. I guess you shouldn't repeat my mistake.

Ride carefully. I'll be looking forward to your posts (and pictures) after your trip.
 

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Hi Bob, I recently made the trek from Houston, Tx. to Anchorage Alaska on my new 03 Wing. The total trip was 11,299 miles and worth every mile. Most beautiful country I've seen to date!!! The Wing was the perfect bike for the trip till we got to Whitehorse in the Yukon located on the AlCan Highway. After Whitehorse the road conditions went from fair to very bad. Alaska suffered an earthquake in Feb. of this year and some of the roads split open. The construction crews had their hands full packing the damage with dirt, gravel and sand. If you are going solo I suggest you take the GS. I almost lost control several times in the muddy construction areas and in the loose gravel. Some riders, once they entered Alaska, refused to return on the AlCan due to its dangerous road surface and shipped their bikes back. I rode back from Anchorage, returning through the gravel once again,,,and the trip from Anachorage to Tok, to the Canadian line to Haines Junction was very dangerous. Maintaining control took a concentrated effort...plus the discourteous truckers passing the other way through the loose gravel pitted my windshield and front fairing...I just ducked behind the shield and kinda wished I had my pistol. Again, the GS would have been the wise choice for the last thousand miles to and from. The country and the wildlife are so beautiful that words don't do them justice...I fought the tears back when I saw some of the sites. It's the way God intended the land to be before we messed it up! Your GS, if like my recent R series Boxer, requires the high octane stuff, There were times on the AlCan that 86 was the only fuel available and I was happy to get that. The Beemer may be OK with 86/87 at those altitudes...may want to check that out before taking the GS. ...the Wing did fine on this fuel. Suggestion, use your Mastercard/Visa while traveling through Canada...they make the conversion for you and it saved me a lot of confusion with the exchange rate...expecially when purchasing fuel. As far as planning is concerned...my wife and I just jumped on the bike and took off...no planning---had a BLAST!!! Best to ya...if I can be of any help please feel free to E-mail me. Rick
 

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Alaska Trip

I took a trip to the Arctic Circle a few years ago on my Honda Pacific Coast. Other than the mud, it was a fantastic trip. I brought camping gear, but only used it three nights, didn't have any problems finding motels. I traveled in July, thinking it would be the dryer month, but I guess that year they had an exceptional wet summer.
If you want to see the pictures of my trip, the url link will take you there.
I plan on going back, and will be riding my Wing. Only difference, I will ride to the end of the road.

[/img]http://wills-domain.com/alaska2001_images/ak7-26_20-40.jpg
http://wills-domain.com/arctic_trip_photos.html
 
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