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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am curious if anyone here has done any research on what it would take to install an HHO generator on a wing. I think it would be an interesting experiment. I would think that space would be an issue and that it would be hard to find a suitable place to locate the unit. A 20% MPG increase would increase the normal 38-40 to about 47mpg or so.

PLEASE!! This is not a thread to argue whether or not HHO is good science or bad science. If you think it is a bunch of BS, I appreciate your opinion, and you don't need to post it here. Thanks
 

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I am curious if anyone here has done any research on what it would take to install an HHO generator on a wing. I think it would be an interesting experiment. I would that space would be an issue and that it would be hard to find a suitable place to locate the unit. A 20% MPG increase would increase the normal 38-40 to about 47mpg or so.

PLEASE!! This is not a thread to argue whether or not HHO is good science or bad science. If you think it is a bunch of BS, I appreciate your opinion, and you don't need to post it here. Thanks
okay you got my interest. what the heck is an hho genreator, and what does it do? bill
 

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From Comcast search;

HHO generators kits produce HHO gas or hydrogen; oxygen and hydrogen thus sometimes referred to as a hydrogen generator kit. Some HHO generator plans produce more HHO gas than others. This oxyhydrogen is made by water electrolysis when electrical current is passed over stainless steel plates with water that has a catalyst. HHO generators produce a gas that is used as a booster or fuel supplement that may increase gas mileage, horse power and reduce emissions on just about any gasoline or diesel engine found on cars, trucks, tractors and even riding lawn mowers. They are often referred to as hydrogen generators or fuel cells.
 

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I've seen one that was designed for a small car and it wasn't about as big as a 2 liter bottle of soda. I think if you wanted to bad enough you could live without a little more space in a saddlebag. Just pack differently. Or run a mini rack on the rear, or truck rack. Putting it somewhere is not the problem. Making it look nice will take some work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've seen one that was designed for a small car and it wasn't about as big as a 2 liter bottle of soda. I think if you wanted to bad enough you could live without a little more space in a saddlebag. Just pack differently. Or run a mini rack on the rear, or truck rack. Putting it somewhere is not the problem. Making it look nice will take some work.
I had considered the saddle bag location, but I was concerned about any heat buildup. Some of the bottles can get to 120 degrees during operation.
 

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Just put the entire affair inside of a section of 3 or 4 inch PVC pipe. Drill and thread holes in a cap, and a fill plug. This would be easy to mount with regular old pipe clamps, and would contain the caustic chemical in case it leaks, and you can insulate the pipe with standard pipe insulation. It will withstand much more than 120 degrees.

Kit
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
okay you got my interest. what the heck is an hho genreator, and what does it do? bill
It is a little more complicated than this, but in a nutshell:

A container filled with water has 2 electrodes inside it. When current is applied, a reaction releases HHO, also known as Brown's Gas. This gas is fed into the air intake of the engine, and supplements the regular gasoline fuel, which is supposed to result in better, more efficient combustion, and can create increase MPG. The biggest drawback seems to be that the energy needed to run an engine solely on HHO exceeds the amount of energy created.

The are a bunch of people who claim to have tripled their gas mileage, but these claims are most likely a bunch of BS. An increase of 10-30% is much more likely.

People who have used this type of system need to fool their computer systems so that they don't try to richen the mixture, since they think the engine is leaned out.
 

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Myth Busters

This technology is technically correct, but the generator can not produce enough on the road to make any difference. You'd need to have a Hydrogen bottle filled before each ride to have enough to be of any benefit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
This technology is technically correct, but the generator can not produce enough on the road to make any difference. You'd need to have a Hydrogen bottle filled before each ride to have enough to be of any benefit.
That's why much of the experimentation is often limited to small displacement engines. The gas CAN be produced on the road, but inot n large enough quantities to fully run an engine, so it is currently limited to supplementing the regular fuel.
 

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The science behind this whole thing is sketchy at best and goes against Newtons laws about energy conservation.

It takes energy from the engine (driving the alternator) to produce the electricity needed to make the hydrogen gas in the first place. You can't recover more energy from the hydrogen gas than it took to make it. It's simply impossible. If you could, you would have invented the worlds first perpetual motion machine.

Proponents will argue that the added hydrogen somehow improves the "efficiency" of the combustion process, but I have never seen that proven anywhere. Truth be told, modern fuel injected combustion engines are currently pretty much peaked out on how well they burn the gas mixture, and I think it you would hard pressed to squeak any more out of them.

If you want to try it on your Wing, go for it, but I wouldn't hold high hopes in it improving your gas mileage even a single MPG. Maybe you'll prove me wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The science behind this whole thing is sketchy at best and goes against Newtons laws about energy conservation.

It takes energy from the engine (driving the alternator) to produce the electricity needed to make the hydrogen gas in the first place. You can't recover more energy from the hydrogen gas than it took to make it. It's simply impossible. If you could, you would have invented the worlds first perpetual motion machine.

Proponents will argue that the added hydrogen somehow improves the "efficiency" of the combustion process, but I have never seen that proven anywhere. Truth be told, modern fuel injected combustion engines are currently pretty much peaked out on how well they burn the gas mixture, and I think it you would hard pressed to squeak any more out of them.

If you want to try it on your Wing, go for it, but I wouldn't hold high hopes in it improving your gas mileage even a single MPG. Maybe you'll prove me wrong.
Yea, I have read all the articles, pro and con. I am sure the truth lies somewhere between no gain, and triple the MPG.

It would be an interesting experiment, to be sure...
 
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