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Discussion Starter #1
Hi;
I am new to the board but have been lurking for a while. My question is about the Zumo coming out.
1. Do I need to purchace special headsets for the helmut? Does that come with it?
2. I read that Kennedy cellset can intergrate it with the bike, why do I need to do this if everything is bluetooth.
3. To listen to the music like MP3 or XM radio, is that also cordless.

I am purchasing my first GPS and I think the Zumo has it all.
THanks in advance
Jerry
 

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Jerry Hempe said:
1. Do I need to purchace special headsets for the helmut? Does that come with it?
There are BlueTooth adapters for the headset (like the Scala Rider), but this is a mono device only and would pair only with the cellphone and voice ouput of the Zumo. The stereo music output is not sent over the BlueTooth output (at least on the 2820).

Jerry Hempe said:
2. I read that Kennedy cellset can intergrate it with the bike, why do I need to do this if everything is bluetooth.
As noted above, everything is not bluetooth, just the phone. The CellSet system will probably allow the bike's intercom system to connect to the GPS, providing the audio connection between the two. The GPS will use the BlueTooth technology to communicate to the cellphone.

Jerry Hempe said:
3. To listen to the music like MP3 or XM radio, is that also cordless.
Not with current technology.

Jerry Hempe said:
I am purchasing my first GPS and I think the Zumo has it all.
On paper, the Zumo is a nice unit, but just based on the published information, it has its' limitations. (Only one route, limited display customization capabilities, etc. We won't know for sure what its capabilities are until we get them in-hand for a true touring-riders perspective.)
 

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Jon said:
On paper, the Zumo is a nice unit, but just based on the published information, it has its' limitations. (Only one route, limited display customization capabilities, etc. We won't know for sure what its capabilities are until we get them in-hand for a true touring-riders perspective.)
Sorry, but I don't see any limitations at all. The Zumo appears to be intrinsically feature-rich. Besides a smattering of so-called "power-users," what percentage of the average GPS user really cares that the Zumo may not direct them to anything besides the route they've requested (presuming they're able to master adding a via point or simply selecting another waypoint to modify or change their route, resp.), or that they can't customize screens to display some extraneous piece of data they feel would be more helpful other than that which the well-thought out screens already offer?

I'm sure that 95% of the prospective purchasing public would find that the Zumo completely meets or exceeds their expectations. Sure there will be a few vocal detractors who feel they have to tweak every aspect of their GPS, but ultimately people will purchase the Zumo because it is one solid SiRF-III-equipped Garmin GPS specifically engineered from top to bottom with a a myriad of motorcycle-friendly attributes which additionally includes the desirable and ride-enjoyment-enhancing Bluetooth, MP3 and XM radio capabilities all in a single package, a product not matched or offered anywhere else. Ultimately, the majority of us simply need a GPS to guide us from Point A to Point B over an unfamiliar route or area as efficiently and seamlessly as possible.

One could also say that every GPS has "limitations" compared to another. Magellans, Garmins (27xx, 28xx series et al.) and even the sacred-cow Iway are limited in comparison to the Zumo (in those disadvantaged ways one cares to point out). So in the end, one can only seek to obtain the GPS which for them offers the best amalgamation of the most features or operational ease that is best suited to their particular usage. For me, it was the Zumo, and my purchasing commitment is the most sterling testimonial I can further provide.
 

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Only ONE route? On a GPS that costs around a thousand bucks? What was Garmin thinking (or not?)

I personally have never needed more than 3 routes simultaneously, but only one? What does one do, store that route onto a laptop, load the new temp route into the Zumo for the current day's ride, then load the original back into it for the ride home?

My (sacred cow) iWay 500c has 40 something routes in it at the moment. As a road captain, it costs me money and significant time to prescout these routes and some of them are researched in the fall then not used until next spring or summer, just for example.

I expect my toys to be practical, too.

David M.
 

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Mike, there may very well be a large contingent of GPS buyers who won't feel that only having one route available to them at one time is not a limitation. Anyone who's ever done serious touring or GPS use has probably utilized the capability of having many routes available to them to run at their discretion and would feel that only having one route onboard the unit would be a limitation. When the 'sacred cow' iWay was first introduced, the Garmin faithful was quick to point out the limitation of the system at to only run one route.

It's also possible that the early pre-release information that we've been able to glean on the Zumo is not accurate - we won't know for sure until they actually start shipping. (For example, if you compare a 2820 to the Zumo, the website states that the Zumo has no tracklog capability, but they've also stated on the spec page that they store up to 10,000 track points so there's a chance that the preliminary data is not accurate).

Another 'power-user' function must be the 'auto-recalculate' option that they've removed from the Zumo - you have no choice now except listen to it recalculate when you pull off your route to get gas or stop for lunch (unless you add these stops to your route before you deviate). This recalculation would only use the hard via points entered in the route, which might not match what you created on your PC.

This is not about bashing the unit or trying to compare it to the 'sacred cow iWay' - this is about making sure you understand what you're spending your hard-earned money on. Just because Garmin says that they've made a 'motorcycle-friendly' unit (their words) doesn't mean that it will meet the relatively high expectations that a lot of touring riders have for their navigational systems. This is just like the comparison of aftermarket GPS units to the on-board Navi system - there's a lot of people who are more than happy with the Navi system and quite a few that have bolted on an aftermarket unit to supplement the limitations of on-board system.

I hope you're happy with your purchase - I'll be doing a full comparison between the Zumo and the 'more commonly' installed units as soon as they actually hit the distribution channels.
 

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[Who to quote, who to quote.... :wink: ]

David M. said:
As a road captain, it costs me money and significant time to prescout these routes and some of them are researched in the fall then not used until next spring or summer, just for example.
This bolsters and corroborates the point I was making. Indeed, most of us aren't road captains. And even if 1 in 20 of us who road motorcycles were, that would still leave the 95% of us I earlier mentioned that don't need multiple routes. So let me help you out and save you your time and money: David, the Zumo is not for you. But of course it doesn't have to be.....

But continuing, I've downloaded several routes on my SPIII at a time, and yes, they're nice to have, but being devoid of more than one of them is certainly something I'm not going to miss nor is it limiting when you can simply punch in a waypoint to get the same result. One extra step -- somehow I'll live. And when it's time to go home, well, they have a button to press for that too -- that's your route.

I don't doubt that some people will really enjoy having every nook and cranny of a 1,000 mile trip (or several trips) fully pre-programmed. We know the Zumo allows you to save one route (and maybe in actuality, later, more). For most people that will be wholly sufficient. I'm just trying to propose to the thinking individual that Garmin hasn't become the premier maker of GPS units in the United States by creating a high-end product like the Zumo and capriciously excluding a life-or-death feature that leaves you lost in some field in the middle of the night. This is much ado about nothing.

And since I already know what it can do and pretty much trust Garmin to produce a reliable and dependable product, yes, unless my Zumo gives me a horrible shock when I press the "dashboard" menu, ejects the SD card onto the road every time I hit a pothole, or routes me into the Pacific Ocean if I've only asked it to take me to Coit Tower, I will unquestionably be happy with it irrespective of what "comparisons" (which I suspect would only advance the same nits) are later made by members of this board or anywhere else. Fait accompli.

Disagreements aside, I still appreciate the friendly and fair discussion and as always, gleaming some insight from everybody's thoughts and opinions. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Guy's
Thanks for the input. I am not sure on how much I will get into the gps. I am just starting to travel a little. Work sure does get in the way of having fun! :cry: I will have to look at the unit an wait for feedback from you guys. :D

If the bluetooth only works with the cellphone and voice commands, is there an audio jack to plug into the unit for the xm and mp3? I mean what if I didn't have a wing, how would one listen to the music.

Thanks
Jerry
 

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Jerry Hempe said:
If the bluetooth only works with the cellphone and voice commands, is there an audio jack to plug into the unit for the xm and mp3? I mean what if I didn't have a wing, how would one listen to the music.
No prob. Glad to help. Yes, there is a standard 3.5mm (1/8") output jack on the Zumo's mount that will provide you audible output of all voice and stereo music sounds.

You could listen directly with earphones/earplugs or headsets, pipe that output through a dedicated separate amplifier (as I do with my Mix-It2) and/or further or independently pipe that through your communications system of choice (like I may do with my Autocom). Bluetooth or wireless is merely an option on the Zumo.
 
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