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Took the wing in today to dealer for the left front fork leaking oil out the dust seal. I was told the anti-dive valve is bad. It will be covered under warrantee. I don`t really feel any issues when braking, (no diving in front end)Does anyone know if this valve being bad would cause the leaking out the fork, and only one side? I was leaning to a bad fork seal myself. any opinons would be appreciated.
 

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The seal is probably bad and there's a big debate on weather or not the anti-dive valve can cause this. As for me, I'm sure there's a link between the two items, and yes it will blow the left fork seal. Your dealer should be changing the seal as well. :D
 

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My anti dive only works when applying the foot brake, the hand brake does not make it work. I thought this strange. You can try it by rocking the bike on the front forks, it goes up and down while using the hand brake. As soon as you put on the foot brake the front forks do not move. Sound normal?
 

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hennigm4 said:
My anti dive only works when applying the foot brake, the hand brake does not make it work. I thought this strange. You can try it by rocking the bike on the front forks, it goes up and down while using the hand brake. As soon as you put on the foot brake the front forks do not move. Sound normal?
what should happen if you dont have either foot or hand brake on, will the forks move free or not????
 

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Blue Winger said:
Silverwing - Move free
well that tell me my froze up because it wont move with hand or foot brake not applyed. It does move when the hand brake is applyed but when you let off it wont move.
 

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Is the Anti-Dive Working

The Anti-Dive, AD, is designed to work when either or both the foot or hand break(s) are applied and the bike is moving. Because of the linked braking system, with the secondary master, the use of the hand break will not activate the AD while the bike is stopped. Below are a few tests you can do at very low speeds, 1-3 mph, to check and to assure yourself if the AD is working or not.

1. At very slow speed (1 mph ) let the front tire pump against a curb, or anything that will stop the bike, without using any breaks. If the forks compress 3-4 inches upon impact you can be assured that the AD is not stuck at that moment and it gives you a feel for the amount of compression the forks should absorb.

2. Now, without moving, apply the hand break and attempt to bounce the front of the bike as hard as you can, at only 5-9 (short legged) and 160 lbs I have to really work at this part. Again, the forks should compress 3-4 inches if the AD is not stuck.

3. Again while stopped, release the hand break, apply only the foot break, and try to bounce the front of the bike. If the forks do not compress more than a fraction of an inch then the AD has properly activated and prevented the forks from compressing.

4. Release the foot break and repeat 2 above. If the forks compress 3-4 inches all is well. If it compresses only a fraction of an inch you have the dreaded sticking AD valve.

5. As a final test to prove the front break does activate the AD valve, use the front break only while rolling forward, again slowly. The forks should not compress more than a fraction of an inch.

Repeat 1-5 a couple of times so you know what it feels like and to assure yourself that the AD is either working or not working. Instead of attempting to bounce the front forks you can gently “slip the clutch” while stopped and use the bike’s power to test in 2, 3, and 4 above.

Personally, I like the AD system. Many have eliminated it as a cure for the rough ride of a sticking AD valve. I take the AD apart and grease it every 20 k miles and have had no problems in 50 k miles on my 2001.
 

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I have a question. Some have disconnected their anti-dive on the bike and noticed a marked difference in riding, an improvement. What I don't remember seeing is if there was a marked difference in braking and the bike diving forward. So my question is: Is the travel of play on the front end greatly increased because of disconnecting the anti-dive or not even noticeable?
 

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Lone Ranger,
I believe the purpose of the anti-dive valve is to prevent a large shift of weight to the the front wheel when the rear brake is applied. If the fork compresses the forward weight shift will lighten the load on the rear wheel and lessen the braking ability of the rear wheel. That is why the anti-dive works when the rear brake is applied IMHO. If the anti-dive is working properly you should not notice any difference in the smoothness of the shock absorbing ability of the front forks. Some members of this board, in particular a couple that I have a great respect for their opinions, have felt that the pin on the anti-dive actuator is too long causing the anti-dive to be activated early or slightly on at all times. This is the reason for the washer being inserted between the actuator and the body of the anti-dive. That being said, I had a sticking valve that was corrected by changing the 0-rings in the valve portion. The swollen o-rings caused the valve to be on at all times preventing the forks compressing properly. After the o-rings were replaced the ride then and now is wonderful. I inserted a washer between the valve and the body as some have suggested and found no difference in the ride verses a properly functioning anti-dive valve.
 

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Re: Is the Anti-Dive Working

John Donohue said:
The Anti-Dive, AD, is designed to work when either or both the foot or hand break(s) are applied and the bike is moving. Because of the linked braking system, with the secondary master, the use of the hand break will not activate the AD while the bike is stopped. Below are a few tests you can do at very low speeds, 1-3 mph, to check and to assure yourself if the AD is working or not.

1. At very slow speed (1 mph ) let the front tire pump against a curb, or anything that will stop the bike, without using any breaks. If the forks compress 3-4 inches upon impact you can be assured that the AD is not stuck at that moment and it gives you a feel for the amount of compression the forks should absorb.

2. Now, without moving, apply the hand break and attempt to bounce the front of the bike as hard as you can, at only 5-9 (short legged) and 160 lbs I have to really work at this part. Again, the forks should compress 3-4 inches if the AD is not stuck.

3. Again while stopped, release the hand break, apply only the foot break, and try to bounce the front of the bike. If the forks do not compress more than a fraction of an inch then the AD has properly activated and prevented the forks from compressing.

4. Release the foot break and repeat 2 above. If the forks compress 3-4 inches all is well. If it compresses only a fraction of an inch you have the dreaded sticking AD valve.

5. As a final test to prove the front break does activate the AD valve, use the front break only while rolling forward, again slowly. The forks should not compress more than a fraction of an inch.

Repeat 1-5 a couple of times so you know what it feels like and to assure yourself that the AD is either working or not working. Instead of attempting to bounce the front forks you can gently “slip the clutch” while stopped and use the bike’s power to test in 2, 3, and 4 above.

Personally, I like the AD system. Many have eliminated it as a cure for the rough ride of a sticking AD valve. I take the AD apart and grease it every 20 k miles and have had no problems in 50 k miles on my 2001.

will did every thing you wrote here and as far as I can see there nothing wrong with my AD. Thanks for the Info guys and you all ride safe
 
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