GL1800Riders Forums banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
567 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I hope to do some camping this year. I won't have a trailer or S.O., so I have some extra room for gear. Anyone have suggestions on good gear or bad?

I'm no boy scout, so any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

See you at Americade!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
A good air mattress helps. If in a tent 2 extra tarps one for under the tent and one for over will help if you get caught in heavy rain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
Make sure that you S.O. , if you have one, also wants to camp. My wifes idea of roughing it is a Holiday Inn thats more than 10 years old. Craig
 
G

·
I've done more MC tent camping than motel camping and have learned some tricks. Air mattress really helps - sleeping bags that zip together are nice, warm and friendly. Plan on carrying the the bare minimum for clothing, ( I don't mean just a G-strap but only a couple changes of cloths to conserve room)find camp sites with laundry facilities instead. Small plastic bag for dirty laundry and another for personal items. Pick nice camp sites with decent shower facilities - this is a must! Never pack any food purchase that along the way. Good rain suits and a small plastic tarp can be real handy. If the weather looks bad - motel is better than toughing it out. Small Coleman back packers cook stove. Get one of those jump-N-start units with the built in air compressor - great for air mattress and power for electric lantern. Buy a real nice dome type tent that pops up without having to assemble the rods - hinge and lock type. This type of tent goes up in 1 minute and down in less than 5.
Also the dome tent are good in wind and will strap on top of your truck rack as most are 6" x 30" when rolled up. Oh yea get a trunk rack.
Pack your stuff in one saddle bag and the wifes in the other - use the truck for the camping etc stuff, just helps get organized and keeps the wife from saying "I don't have any room because your hogging it all up" and visa versa. (camping gear never complains)

Most important things - instant coffee - camera - fun


If you pull decide to pull a trailer - add golf clubs, lawn chairs, TV, Laptop and maybe the dog - if he is good :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
storm said:
If the weather looks bad - motel is better than toughing it out.
The above is excellent advice. Spending a night in a tent with severe weather blowing through the area is not fun. I put my stove, fuel, lantern, cookpot, spices, hammock in a medium size soft side cooler and strap it to the back seat with my tent, camp chair, sleeping bag and collapsible rod and reel. I wear one pair of Draggin' Jeans and carry a spare pair along with one pair of shorts and tennis shoes. They are really nice around the campsite and I get tired of wearing my combat touring boots. I really find motorcycle only campgrounds to be great. I especially like the Blue Ridge Motorcycle Campground in Cruso, NC and Two Wheels Only in Suchess, GA. The AAA campground book lists amenities like laundry facilities. Anymore a lot of campgrounds have small cabins if you get tired of the tent. If you have a personal stereo plugged into your aux input on the Wing, carry your headphones so you can listen to it in camp. I buy the Wal Mart brand one gallon size Zip Loc bags to pack clothing in. I can stuff several pair of underwear or a couple of shirts etc. in one, then press the air out, makes it really easy to pack all the clothing I need in one saddlebag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
We camped in a tent at our first Americade last year in a state campground right on Rt. 9. All was good until Friday night rolled around and all hell broke loose. Straight pipe burnouts and straight pipe drag races up and down Rt. 9, etc. kept us awake until around 5am. We left a day early because we figured we were in for more of the same Saturday night.

If you are planning on camping at Americade on Friday or Saturday I suggest you find a campground away from the action. We will be staying in a motel this year.

As for equipment, we hauled the bike (not a Goldwing) up in a pickup and had a large tent and many other amenities that would not fit on a bike. When we get our wing we will definitely have to cut our camping gear down by about 90%.

www.riderwarehouse.com has a lot of motorcycle friendly camping equipment listed on their website. I have heard that the Eureka Timberline tents are very nice.

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Jon:

I tend to use backpacking type equipment as it is more compact and lighter. I have a two man tent that is real good in windy conditions, a self inflating thermo rest and sleeping bag. I carry a small stove that runs off propane, a pot and water bottles and candles and some extra rope. I try to get that stuff in my trunk and saddle bags along with smacks etc. I keep all my clothes and personal gear in a t bag and strap that on the back seat.

George
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,477 Posts
Backpacking stuff works great for motorcycle camping.

Lazygirl and I prefer primitive camp grounds. We like to get as close as possible to the wilderness experience. If you're gonna camp in some KOA parking lot with an RV next to you running his generator and AC all night, you're better off at a motel.

Wear your leather and look just as bad as you can when the families drive by in their RV looking for a place. Dogs are the worst. "Oh little Fifi is just one of the family."

"Gee, I hope the rest of your family doesn't pee on my tent like that."

Also little Fifi will scare away all of the wildlife for a mile around.

Make sure your tent, air mattress and sleeping bag are good quality. If you sleep well, camping is incredible. If you don't sleep well, it sucks. Be patient though. I sleep badly the first night or two on the road, and then I sleep like a baby for the rest of the trip

Personal experience: avoid Leinenkugels beer while camping. I slept like a baby that night. Lots of pooping and crying.

Save socks and underwear that you would normally throw out. Then use them for camping and toss them as you go.

You're going to have plenty of packing room with the back seat empty. Air mattress and sleeping bag bungee nicely onto back seat. Pack the light stuff in the tail trunk.

If you're using the sidestand, don't forget to push in on the left saddlebag door while pulling the latch, if the saddlebag is loaded. This will let you avoid the trip to the dealer for warranty replacement of latch mechanism.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Lots of suggestions for air matresses -- I solo camped last summer and took along a cot that folded up about the same size as my small tent (6" x 30"). It has a light frame that goes together pretty fast and keeps me about 6 inches off the ground. Easily strapped it and the tent to the trunk rack.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,091 Posts
Lots of good camping tips in the previous posts, thanks. I have a 7x7 dome tent that cost $24.99 on sale new,bought in 1998 and have been useing it 5-10 times per year since,it has served me very well. The tent Storm mentioned has got my interest, any hot tips on where to purchase a good tent that sets up in a minute and down in 5? I would want a tent that fits easily into the wings luggage compartments as my current tent does. Been useing one of those self inflating sleeping pads which it a whole lot better than nothing but still not what I call comfortable. Used an air matress one season but it is too small and a major workout to inflate so gave up on that. The mummy style sleepingbag fits in a stuffsack and I think 3 would fit into one saddlebag with room to spare. Instead of a carrying a lantern I just tape a string to a small flashlite and hang it from the tent cieling,some of the new LED flashlites will work continuously for days on 2 AAA bateries and only cost $12. It,s fun to go on a trip and later analize what was brought along and what should have been brought or left home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
When we camp we like to camp in comfort.
The air matress is a Queen with built in blow up box spring. A rechargeable air pump from WalMart is a must.
Our colman stove has a grill on one side.
Works great.
Tent is Pa Ha Que 10x9 with 92" head room in the middle and 72" at the sides.
After living on a 25 foot sail boat for 2 years I want to stand up to put my pants on.
As stated above a couple of tarps are a must.
The chairs we have are from Bass pro shop and are very comfy.
We carry carpet for the tent floor to protect it from the chairs and make it cozzy on the feet.
The fireplace logs are a nice way to have a fire when wood is hard to find and start with no fuss. More photos at http://www.warbirdbob.com/camping.htm
TR
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
I can't believe nobody remembered the most important item! While mountain lion repellant could prove useful, how could you dream of going camping without a small stove, coffee pot and coffee? :?: Some cups would be nice too. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
652 Posts
Forgot to mention.
Compression bags. They are great. you can get them at Walmart in the camping area. Stuff them with whatever....pillows, beding, clothes and then close them and sinch them down.
3 large pillows now take up almost no space.
TR
PS Yes he is right don't forget the coffee. There is nothing like the smell of fresh perked coffe in the woods at daybreak!!!!!
Also be sure and have several shkedown trips before the big one. We learn an new trick every time out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
347 Posts
Greetings,

I played professional soldier for 21 years and consider myself quite adept at camping - especially when you have to lug all your stuff along on your back or in very limited space.

IF you are going to be a 3 season camper, the choices are much easier.

A good tent is a requirement regardless of season. Dependent on what you need, a really good bivy will provide plenty of protection from the elements, pack into a small space, but obviously is limited in storage and living space. Get a Campmor catalog or browse them online for a 2 person dome with a good rainfly. A cheap ground sheet will protect the bottom of your tent from punctures. Get some seam sealer and seal the seams on your tent as soon as you purchase it. Set it up in the garage or somewhere dry and treat all the seams before you ever expose it to the elements. Never touch the inside of a wet tent unless you want that drip on your forehead all night long.

Get an ultralight sleeping bag that will protect you down to 40 degrees. If you are going to camp in colder weather, add a fleece inner liner. These will stuff into a remarkably small space. Sleep nekkid except for socks and a sleeping cap. You'll stay much warmer. Fold your clothes up and make a pillow out of them. A self-inflating map makes the ground warmer and softer. An air mattress is even more comfy if you have the lung power to blow it up.

I prefer a small single burner propane stove. 1 lb propane bottles are easy to get anywhere and it will boil water in no time.

A small stainless steel coffee pot and stainless steel cup provides that morning wakeup or that evening toddy.

LED flashlights are great. I would definitely add an LED headlamp so you can see hands free.

I've got a folding chair and folding table that will fit into the side bags on my wing. You need somewhere to sit and somewhere to put your stuff.

Get a small soft sided ice chest to keep cool drinks in.

Take a minimum of clothing. Wash as you need to on the road or carry the old stuff and throw it away. Laundromats can be very interesting places to visit.

A package of Wet Ones provides quick and easy cleanup. The single packet size can be stuffed anywhere and you can take as many as you want.

If you are going to be packing everything, a waterproof bag is essential. WATERPROOF not water resistant.

Canned food can be packed or just shop daily. Dehydrated food packs take up very little space and are tasty when prepared properly. The bag they come in works great as the serving bowl.

A good bottle of hot sauce (I prefer Texas Pete) will make just about anything taste better.

Load the bike, go out of the driveway, and then come back in and camp in the yard the first time. Go through the packing/setup/takedown drill and see what you might have forgotten or don't really need. It's much better to find out what you might have forgotten before you are 500 miles down the road.

With proper planning and loading, you can stay on the road indefinitely.

Rick
Tuscaloosa, AL
04 Candy Red
GWRRA
HRCA
US Army Retired!
 
G

·
WarBirdBob said:
When we camp we like to camp in comfort.
The air matress is a Queen with built in blow up box spring. A rechargeable air pump from WalMart is a must.
[/img]
now THATS my kind of campin :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
567 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
You guys are just amazing!

Not only have I been thoroughly prepared, I've been entertained, and forewarned ..... (esp. the guy drinking sugar)... hope to see you at Americade. I think I'll be helping sean at the cyclegadgets booth, so stop by and say "hi".

For a pop up tent, here's what I found: http://www.outinstyle.com/Merchant2/mer ... /TENT10002
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,417 Posts
Jon, On your way to Americade, drop by the house.

How we doing on the 2610 set ups? I know "Patience Grasshopper"...LOL

Bulldog
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
788 Posts
Motorcycle Camping

I've been motorcycle camping since 1981 – I have ranged from Seattle to Key West to Nova Scotia to Alaska to San Diego. I’ve camped in every kind of weather that you can imagine, except a hurricanes and tornadoes. I've learned a lot in that time.

Number 1 - you can't beat a self-inflating air mattress. “Thermarest” is the brand that I use. They will insulate you from the ground far, far better than any air mattress. I have camped on snow and still had snow under the air mattress in the morning. My buddies, on regular air mattresses, were sleeping on the ground. Guess which one does a better job of insulating?!

Number 2 – use a 3 season, self standing, and waterproof tent with a ground cloth. The cheaper tents will NOT keep the water out in an all night downpour. And make sure that you tuck the ground cloth in under the sides of the tent, otherwise you will have a tent sized bathtub with you in the middle. I like the Eureka Tetragon series. They have a good window to keep from getting claustrophobic and the door has a built in mesh screen, which operates independent of the door. Only tent I know of that does that. This has the advantage of being able to zip the door AND the screen from within the tent.

Number 3 – there is absolutely no substitute for a down sleeping bag. The artificial stuff just doesn’t measure up. The only caution here is that wet down DOES NOT keep you warm, so pack it in a WATERPROOF bag. I also carry a polar fleece liner. In warmer weather, the fleece liner is all I need. In colder weather, the down bag is just right. When snot freezes, the fleece liner inside the down bag should keep you comfy. I carry both in separate compression sacks inside of waterproof sacks.

Number 4 – a good single burner cook stove, propane or unleaded gas or Coleman fuel. I prefer the unleaded gas type, because then I am automatically carrying spare gas for the bike. I’ve had to use that reservoir twice in all my years of motorcycle camping. And, don’t forget the can opener, a small fry pan and eating tools.

Number 5 – LED flashlight and LED miner’s light. LED lights last forever on a set of batteries. The miner’s light comes in real handy when trying to put up camp in the dark. I can say that I have done that too many times.

Number 6 – take only one or two changes of clothes with maybe an extra shirt and socks. Clothes take up too much room. And, yes, I am very guilty of taking too much clothing.

Number 7 – look forward to perfect riding weather, but plan on the PERFECT STORM. You need good rain gear, from your collar to your boots. My weapon of choice, when fighting Mother Nature, is the complete Gerbings line of heated Jacket, Pants, Socks and Glove Liners and Alpinestar Boots.

Number 8 – always bring toilet paper. You never know whether the camp ground ran out or not. And bring a pair of shower sandals. Really nasty stuff grows on public campground shower stall floors.

Number 9 – yes, a folding stool or chair is also real nice when the community picnic table is not near your campsite.

Number 10 – make a list of everything that you think that you need on a camping trip and check off items as you pack or stack them.

Number 11 – what did I forget?
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top