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Discussion Starter #1
I am on the fence on getting a new 18 or 19 DCT then making it a trike.

Am not interested in a two wheel version.

Anyone trike one yet and if so, what has been your impression of the kit?
 

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IronMan
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Roadsmith has one the boys in alabama have them have pics on there web page
 

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I ride with the guy who bought the first 6th gen that CSC had for sale. It was the one on display at WingDing. I believe he really likes his. To my knowledge, none have an "easy steer" yet.

I've heard the drive shaft angle is 16 degs. CSC told me they've resolved that by using a drive shaft with 2 CV joints ... one on the front and one on the rear. However, an angle like that would really reduce power to the rear wheels ... as well as fuel economy. That's a lot of angle.
 

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Not a trike guy. If I were-- I would pick up one of the many 2014 Goldwing Valkeries still available with no mileage that Honda is selling for $10K. Then I would do a Motortrike Reverse conversion for 10K and be out the door for 20K.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Roadsmith has one the boys in alabama have them have pics on there web page
I do like my Roadsmith.


I ride with the guy who bought the first 6th gen that CSC had for sale. It was the one on display at WingDing. I believe he really likes his. To my knowledge, none have an "easy steer" yet.

I've heard the drive shaft angle is 16 degs. CSC told me they've resolved that by using a drive shaft with 2 CV joints ... one on the front and one on the rear. However, an angle like that would really reduce power to the rear wheels ... as well as fuel economy. That's a lot of angle.
Wow!!! CSC sounds like they need to step it up. I wonder if the other makers have solved this issue and the bike will have good power and fuel economy.
 

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I do like my Roadsmith.

Wow!!! CSC sounds like they need to step it up. I wonder if the other makers have solved this issue and the bike will have good power and fuel economy.
Hannigan's rear end was always more inline with the output shaft than all the others. However, I've not been to their web page to see if they have a 6th gen trike yet.
 

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If you are only interested in a trike, personally I can't see much of an advantage to making one out of a 2018/19 model.

One of the main advantages of the new Wings is the reduced weight, but that advantage only counts for much if you stay with two wheels. To me the 2017 and earlier Wings make a much better platform for a trike. The new Wing is really a big sport touring bike while the 2017 and earlier Wings are a full-boat, luxury, two-up touring bikes. They offer better weather/wind protection for both rider and passenger, plus way better seating accommodations for the passenger.

Get yourself a nice 2017 or earlier Wing, either used or new, and trike that. IMO you'll be much happier, plus have some extra cash left in your pocket.

***
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hannigan's rear end was always more inline with the output shaft than all the others. However, I've not been to their web page to see if they have a 6th gen trike yet.
They show one for the new generation. I was comparing truck space, CSC has 8.5 cubic feet, Hannigan has 8, and Roadsmith has 5.5. Storage is important to me for the overnight rides....beats having to buy a trailer to keep items dry.

Decisions, Decisions....
 

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Whatever you decide on, choose your trike builder carefully. Many will care less about resolving any issues after they have your money ... I know because I often get to hear about it. In Florida there are only 2 I'd recommend. The others I would stay far away from. Yes ... a good trike dealer with good service means that having them install the trike kit cost more ... because they do a better job and that takes more time.
 

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Right on Greg, builder makes all the difference. I'm aware of the two builders you have in mind. I can visualize the two CV joints on the CSC, that just does not make sense to me, but they are pros, guess they know what they are doing. If they continue to build the offset, then there's not much choice than to continue the multiple CV joints.
 

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I’m not a trike guy... (yet), but did snap a few photos at the WingDing.
In no particular order, some of the manufacturers are self explanatory, some not, and you may recognize others?
 

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I'm not a trike guy, but after seeing this on Jay Leno's Garage, I would consider this conversion.

https://www.tiltingmotorworks.com/

If you click on the news tab, you can see the Jay Leno's video.
What I like about this one, is that it doesn't mess with the drivetrain and it's completely reversible.
 

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I am on the fence on getting a new 18 or 19 DCT then making it a trike.

Am not interested in a two wheel version.

Anyone trike one yet and if so, what has been your impression of the kit?
See Cycle Trader listing for new 2018 / 2019 DCT trikes - prices range from $35K to $40K -all trikes listed are 2018 model
https://www.cycletrader.com/2018-GO...year=2018:2020&sort=price:desc&modelkeyword=1


For comparison the two wheel DCT tour models listed in Cycle Trader show to be running from $21K to $32K depending on year & options

Since converting from bike to trike typically costs in the range of $11k to $16k (or more) depending on kit brand & option upgrades to base conversion, it looks like buying a new trike would probably be less cost than buying a newbike & having it converted.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
See Cycle Trader listing for new 2018 / 2019 DCT trikes - prices range from $35K to $40K -all trikes listed are 2018 model
https://www.cycletrader.com/2018-GO...year=2018:2020&sort=price:desc&modelkeyword=1


For comparison the two wheel DCT tour models listed in Cycle Trader show to be running from $21K to $32K depending on year & options

Since converting from bike to trike typically costs in the range of $11k to $16k (or more) depending on kit brand & option upgrades to base conversion, it looks like buying a new trike would probably be less cost than buying a newbike & having it converted.
Thanks.

I have been seeing a lot of sales for them. Knew buying a ready made one would be a little cheaper depending on bells and whistles on them. My goal is to find someone who has one and their thought on the ride of it. See if it rides any different than the older model.

I like my 08 Roadsmith trike.
 

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Thanks.

See if it rides any different than the older model.

I like my 08 Roadsmith trike.

Like you, I do not know for sure but it would certainly stand to reason that they would. Take 100 LBS, thereabouts off of any vehicle that weighs less than 1500 LBS should make a big difference for one thing and then the DCT on a Trike would be crazy good.
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I really like the demo model look of the Hannigan, can't wait for their production release. (just found out while typing this that production is released, same shape)
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I just got off the phone with Cory at Hannigan and he tells me that they just in the last couple of weeks have started to deliver Trike Kits to dealers.
I will have to talk to Horizon Trikes is Arkansas, they are the closest Hannigan dealer to me and they have 4 kits on order.
 

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I ride with the guy who bought the first 6th gen that CSC had for sale. It was the one on display at WingDing. I believe he really likes his. To my knowledge, none have an "easy steer" yet.

I've heard the drive shaft angle is 16 degs. CSC told me they've resolved that by using a drive shaft with 2 CV joints ... one on the front and one on the rear. However, an angle like that would really reduce power to the rear wheels ... as well as fuel economy. That's a lot of angle.

Hannigan cuts modifies and rewelds the factory fork to make it Easy Steer. They also widen the fork and put a 180 tire up front.


CSC is making a complete fork from scratch to accomplish Easy Steer, but using the standard wheel.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Hannigan cuts modifies and rewelds the factory fork to make it Easy Steer. They also widen the fork and put a 180 tire up front.


CSC is making a complete fork from scratch to accomplish Easy Steer, but using the standard wheel.
Max, I saw your vid that was done awhile back with you next door to Hannigan at Wing Ding showing off their 2018 trike kit. I like what I saw...the problem is the closest dealer is 4 hours away. A PITA to drop off a bike to trike. I will wait to see when they finish a few to get the hang of it for the new model if I go with Hannigan.
 

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Thanks.

I have been seeing a lot of sales for them. Knew buying a ready made one would be a little cheaper depending on bells and whistles on them. My goal is to find someone who has one and their thought on the ride of it. See if it rides any different than the older model.

I like my 08 Roadsmith trike.

I think that a couple of guys on the Trike Talk Forum have 2018 DCT conversions - you might check there www.triketalk.com
 
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