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Discussion Starter #1
OEM brake pads wore about 42 thousand miles.
( 58 bucks )
EBC brake pads wore out, less than half, what the OEMs did, (And more dust ) BUT..cost half...(guess it's tit for tat ???!)
(EBC are 32 bucks)

Any other good choices/reccommended brake pads out there, I'm not aware of ?
OEMs, here I come !

Lets ride em' ! :biker:
www.pashnit.com

IRMac
 

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Check out the SBS ceramic pads. Ceramic pads give a much better "feel" and produce 90% less brake dust. Best to glass bead blast the discs then wash in soap and water. Requires removal so second best is to get a sanding block and some 180 grit paper and remove as much of the glaze as possible then wash the rotors in soap and water. You should do the deglaze no matter what pads you put on.
The ceramic pads will last longer and are gentle on the rotor surface.
SBS has a website. Scandanavian Brake System is what the SBS stands for.
 

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No offense meant, but I strongly disagree with the use of an abrasive material like sandpaper on an brake disc.

I won't ever use any kind of sandpaper or emory cloth on brake discs. Because some of the grit from the sandpaper inevitably gets embedded into the disc. Then every time you apply your brakes, you increase the abrasion and your discs and pads will wear uneven and faster than normal.

There is a company in Illinois (Mares) that has special flat rotary grinder for resurfacing bike brake discs and I think they charge about $40 a disc. I had some done once years ago, but it reduced the thickness enough that they soon warped afterwards.

Your best bet is just to clean them real good with brake cleaner and a clean cloth.

Please don't think I am picking on your post, but the last time I checked with SBS, they only sold their ceramic pads for a few select sport bike (Honda XXX, Hayabusa and some others). The pads they sold for all other models were not ceramic, but were a sintered pad. When I spoke to them on the phone a few years back, they did not recommend ceramic pads on a heavy touring bike. They told me the ceramic pads were intended more for the track as they require time to heat up before the work well.

Does SBS now sell a true ceramic pad for the Wing, or is it just their normal sintered pad?
 

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For a long time I have been cosidering to grid of the holes on the rotors. The holes are pritty sharp and I think that might cause the pads to wear out faster. Has anyone tryed this?
 

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My factory Honda pads only lasted about 20,000 miles on the front and 35,000 on the rear. I am about to replace the fronts again around 40,000. I have acheived equal milage out of the EBC's at a much reduced cost over factory prices. I have not noticed an increase in dust from the EBC's. I plan on continuing to use the EBC's until a lower priced alternative rolls around.

I have also been looking at the cooling holes on the rotors and the lack of a chamfer. It seems to me that this would cause a cheese grater affect on the brake pads but I assume that Honda Engineers knew what they were doing by leaving them sharp like they are. My last motorcycle, a 1982 Suzuki GL850GLZ had chamfered holes on the rotors an it seems to stop just fine.
 

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Fred, no slight taken but you need to break up the glaze, bead blast or sanding if the rotors are not being recut. You are not using heavy grit wood butcher garnet paper but sand paper meant for metal. If the disc and rotor worked in a clean enviorment then there would be a concern about some grit but the last time I checked they got lots of exposure to some pretty gritty material.
I have put several sets of SBS ceramic on various wings, but not on an 1800. Will check into their listings.
On my brake lathe I have cut bike rotors using high quality cutters, at least the way Snap-on charges there better be some quality.
I have not had success with grinding bike rotors as the mounting methods I have used/seen pulls the rotor down flat to a work surface. the first side is ground then it is flipped and the other side is ground. You will achieve parallelism but when the pressure is taken off the runout may still be there. Gives you that nice pedal pulse.
Anyway your results may vary.
BTW, the one thing I avoid putting onto rotors is brakecleaners.
 

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Here's a quote from an SBS web site regarding the SBS ceramic pads

DESIGNED FOR ALL GENERAL PURPOSE STREET APPLICATION.
QUICK COOL DOWN AND MINIMAL TO NO FADING. MINIMUM ROTOR WEAR.
FREE OF ASBESTOS AND LEAD.
LONG LIFE, DEPENDABILITY AND EXCELLENT OVERALL PERFORMANCE IN WET.


The part numbers are for the front SBS 735 HF
and rear SBS 736 LF
 

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DESIGNED FOR ALL GENERAL PURPOSE STREET APPLICATION.
QUICK COOL DOWN AND MINIMAL TO NO FADING. MINIMUM ROTOR WEAR.
FREE OF ASBESTOS AND LEAD.
LONG LIFE, DEPENDABILITY AND EXCELLENT OVERALL PERFORMANCE IN WET.
I must say, these pads sound so great I bet they install themselves. :D I'll keep the OEM pads. You Guys can have the hard and noisy discount pads.

When you Guys say your pads were worn out at 20,000, just how thick/thin were the pads? You have to remember the OEM pads are only about 1/8" thick when new.
 

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Bull Dog, try here http://www.sbs.dk/

Lucky Phil, my dislike for brake clean covers a few bases. First it is a high health risk to users, cleans out all your mucus membranes and gives you things like itchy eyes, lungs that are open to infection and numbs the nerves in your hands so they feel like they're asleep. Watch the next time you use it to see if you feel real tired afterwards. Usually have stomach pangs like you are hungry as well. Aerosol cans are the worst, I use a pump spray if I need to use the stuff. I prefer to use hot soapy water to wash brake parts and rotors which also traps the brake dust.
On the rotors there is a strong feeling, yeah I know I like solid proof as well, amoungst brake repair people that brake clean contributes to glazing.
I do what works for me so that I end up with a quality job. Good tools and equipment, quality parts and proper procedure.
Last but not least the trainer at the last Raybestos Brake CLinic I went to said nix on the brake clean for rotors. Ceramic pads are sensitive to iron filing loading from fresh cut rotors so by washing them in soapy water the filings rust, pop off and are washed away. Then rinse and dry, nothing more to be done. New tricks for old dogs.
Red, the SBS pads are anything but cheap and certainly not lesser quality than OE Honda.
Your results may vary. Deems da breaks! LOl
 

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Good info Dennis. Thanks for the tips. Yes, I usually get brake cleaner all over my hands till they get numb. Never really thought too much about it. After cleaning aircraft parts in MEK and surviving, I figured brake cleaner was no big deal. Maybe your soap and water technique has some merit.
 

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Wait, eureka. I just had a brain bubble burst (ouch). Apparently my memory ain't what it used to be. (Must have been that concussion I got on hwy 341 in Arkansas in 2000) It is all coming back to me now.

What I was told, was never to use sandpaper or emory cloth on brake PADS, (not the rotors) because the grit gets embedded into the lining material. Which makes sense when you think about it.

Sorry for the brain gas...
 

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Fred my opinion is it is the lesser of evils. Most times the rotors of drums coming off the brake lathe are given a quick going over with some sandpaper. I prefer the sponges with the grit on them, doesn't catch and lasts longer. The brake pad mfg say not necessary if proper cuts are made but I have caught finishes that looked good but that had spots of glaze. The sandpaper pulls on the good finish and slides on the glaze.
I doubt that the steel wool will have enough of an effect.
If the rotors in the 1800 are anything like the previous wing rotors, in my experience, they will deglaze with sandpaper.
Also for those reading who don't know, bike rotors are usually stainless steel, cars use cast iron. Some Brit Iron used chromed cast iron, carbon fibre up next.

Fred, on a health note, I take the herb Milk Thistle to help cleanse my liver of the petro-chemicals. Plan is to ride long and be shot by a jealous husband when I crack 96. Gotta stay healthy 46 years to live!
 

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Dennis,

Go back and read previous post I just added, apparently right before yours. I had suffered a memory failure. Also, be advised that I edited the previous post and removed the reference to sanding the rotor and steel wool as it was incorrect.

What I meant to post was this:

Some folks have previous said (on the COG email list) that you can resurface brake pads themselves and deglaze them by rubbing them on sandpaper. One of the motorcycle magazines (Motorcyclist?) even did a section on brake repair where they showed someone de-glazing a PAD with sandpaper. I was taught this is a big no-no, as it embeds abrasives into the pad material that can't be removed. It is probably OK to use abrasives on the rotor itself, but not on the pads.

Again, sorry for the memory lapse.
 

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I know all about memory problems, Fred. No problemo. My $.02 worth - I wouldn't think of installing new brake pads without first breaking the glaze on the rotors. What you want is a non-directional scratch pattern. For that, I use 3M rotor conditioning discs or a special rotary brush made just for the purpose by Brush Research (BRM). Soap and water works well, but brake cleaner is the best thing to use to clean a rotor. Just use precautions like latex gloves and maybe a respirator mask. The stuff can really harm you if you inhale it or get it into your bloodstream through your pores. Chamfering rotor holes? That may not extend pad life, but it'll get rid of the chattering sound you sometimes hear, like playing cards rattling on the spokes of a kid's bicycle.
 

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I was checking my GL1800 rear pads today and could NOT see the "wear groove" so I assumed they need to be replaced. I have 19,000 miles on my 2002. I read above where Red says the OEM pads are only about 1/8 inch thick when new. My pads are atleast 1/8 inch thick even though I can't see the "wear groove". Now I don't know if I should replace them or not. :?: :?: :?: SLIDE
 

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SLIDE said:
I was checking my GL1800 rear pads today and could NOT see the "wear groove" so I assumed they need to be replaced. I have 19,000 miles on my 2002. I read above where Red says the OEM pads are only about 1/8 inch thick when new. My pads are atleast 1/8 inch thick even though I can't see the "wear groove". Now I don't know if I should replace them or not. :?: :?: :?: SLIDE
Slide....I was talking about the thickness of the front pads, both sets. The rear pads are thicker, don't ask why. :(
 
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