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The days of working on your cage in the backyard under a shade tree is almost a thing of the past with all the high computer boards and sealed complex components.

Do you feel that's were Honda is heading with the future Goldwings were it will be impossible to service on your own?

Cheers!.....Oh and Happy New Year my Goldwing friends.
 

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Wi_Winger said:
...Do you feel that's were Honda is heading with the future Goldwings were it will be impossible to service on your own?
As I look down through the list of maintenance items, there seems to be a number of things a reasonably skilled owner can still perform (IMHO).

But I’ll agree that the electronics (and a couple other items) are becoming off-limits to all but the most advanced and equipped wrenches.

Interestingly enough, I hear more and more Wing owners (and others too) that no longer care to do even some of the most basic maintenance.

Maybe Honda, BMW, and others are hearing the same thing…
 
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Very true,and i miss tinkering in the garage,now that i own an 1800.I bought the wing because of the high service costs of my bmw.The 1800 is a very simple to service machine compared to other touring bikes.Most people over service them in my opinion,(fluid changes aside). I have 60,000 km on mine,and i won't be taking it in for a valve check,because it doesn't need it. i have changed my air filter twice,and they both looked like new.I take the wheels off the bike and in for new rubber when needed.Very simple with the single sided swingarm.(remember the1500!)
Ride,ride,ride. That's what it's all about.
 

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Wi-Winger, Weed eaters and chain saws need a lap top to change the
mixture on some current models. galewing
 

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I sure don't miss setting the gap on points and replacing condensers and rebuilding carbs every year. Personally I don't think modern vehicles are any harder to work on. You just have to learn a few new tricks. Code readers do most of the work for you and will tell you the faulty component or sensor most of the time. How hard is it to plug in a box and read out a code? In the old days you had to guess.

I think too many folks let fuel injection and computer controls intimidate them. In reality, they are more reliable, and easier to fix. Once you isolate the bad sensor or component, you unbolt it and plug in a new one. And fuel injection is so much more reliable than carburetors. My bike has well over 100K miles on it, with zero work on the fuel system. When was the last time you had a carburetor go 100K miles without having to be rebuilt?

All you have to do on this bike, is change the fluids, filters, plugs and tires and ride it.
 

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You know, I was thinking about the old shade tree days not long ago, remembering helping my Dad with maintenance on the family vehicles when I was growing up. I helped him change the oil and filter every 3,000 miles when that included crawling around under the car with a grease gun looking for the 8-10 grease fittings scattered around the suspension and drive line. I helped him repack the front wheel bearings and adjust the brakes every 5,000 miles. There were the "tune-ups" - plugs, points, condenser, distributor cap and rotor thrown in now and then, and we changed the antifreeze every couple of years, and a brake job now and then. It wasn't unusual to do a "valve job" (top end rebuild) every 50,000 miles, and since Dad liked to get his money's worth out of a vehicle (I still have the 1940 Chevy pickup that he bought new setting in the garage, going through a slow restoration) we did a few 100,000 mile "ring jobs" (complete engine rebuilds.) Of course, there was always the carburetor to adjust or rebuild...

Today, I change the oil and filter in the Wings every 8-10,000 miles, the plugs every 20,000 or so along with the air filter, change the antifreeze and the brake/clutch fluid every couple of years, and... well, there must be something else... and we're good for a couple of hundred thousand miles.

So, I guess that Honda is doing their share to do away with the shade tree mechanic... Can't say that I'm complaining about that though...

The downside is that, yes, "gettin' 'er home" with some "bailin' wir' and chewin' gum" is probably a thing of the past, but, the upside is that failures are much fewer and farther between.

The Good Ol' Days? Well, I think Dad had that figured out, too. He said they were the Good Ol' Days because they were the days when he was YOUNG! I'm beginning to get a better understanding of that every day...
:?
 

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I used to do a lot of my own wrenching on my vehicles as well but I got away from it as I "advanced" in years.
It's more fun just to ride the sucker and let someone else (if you can find a good dealer) do the work.
I wonder what the age grouping looks like for us 1800 owners?
My days of "if it aint broke take it apart to find out way" are long gone.
 
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