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Wore one similar 20 years ago standing out in mn winters with fire gear freezing my buns off I had two batteries, one always on cig lighter charger in squad car they would last about hour but batteries are much better now I know you can get a 12v to 5v cig lighter adapter to plug it into wing If you keep the core warm arms and hands are ok I use grip heaters a lot and heated seat to I am a spoiled freez baby
 

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Have looked into them. I think the greatest advantage is that they can be warn and be warm away from the bike. That may be great if your doing and have other activities and not just riding.
I concluded that this may be a nice feature, however I have had the Lith-Ion batteries fail after multiple charges. They are expensive to replace and have to be kept charged when mot in use. Never store them without charging first.


So I concluded that I will only use heated gear for seasonal riding, and the battery powered units were no great advantage for me. I see why Tourmaster went this way. Expanding their market. :thumbup:


Corventure Dave
 

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I'm skeptical on its usefulness. I ride a lot in the teens and 20s and my Gerbing's serve me well, they pull a couple amps to keep me comfortable. This battery model is limited to USB charging that takes forever on most USB ports for a Li-Ion battery and only get about an amp or two from the USB port. The heating elements are only across the back and in the collar; you're front and arms are what take cold directly even on a wing. It might be handy if you had a Gerbing's and parked a while and needed extra warmth while walking around but I suspect it's not long lived comfort and once you're on the road with a dead battery you're gonna pay for it. Might be nice if shoveling the driveway or someplace where retreat from the cold is easy.

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Discussion Starter #5
Since I'm in Houston, I'm only looking for minor relief, not relief from "bone-chilling" temps :)

I know you guys up north need *real* relief - We never shovel our driveways down here :)
 

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If you want a good battery powered jacket buy a real one from https://www.milwaukeetool.com/Products/Work-Gear/Heated-Gear
Ace hardware stores carry them so they are available all over the country in case you ever need to replace a battery while traveling, I don’t own one but have several friends that do and they seem to be very happy with them.
 

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If you want a good battery powered jacket buy a real one from https://www.milwaukeetool.com/Products/Work-Gear/Heated-Gear
Ace hardware stores carry them so they are available all over the country in case you ever need to replace a battery while traveling, I don’t own one but have several friends that do and they seem to be very happy with them.
Thanks for the link. The only thing I don't like about this is that it's a full jacket, not a liner. My plan was to replace the inner liner of my motorcycle jacket (with all the protective pads) with a heated liner when it gets too cold for the non-heated liner. But that looks like a great jacket for folks shoveling their driveways :grin2:
 

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I have the Milwaukee Jacket. It does not work real well for riding in cold temps. On high the battery last about 1 hour. 4 Hours on low. No heat in sleeves. In order for it to keep you warm it needs to be under a coat.
Heated jacket liner with cord works much better.
 
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Mr Boyd I think you might have been looking at the wrong jacket they make about four different models and a couple of them are made to wear under a jacket, it’s been quite a while since I actually looked at them in a store but the one I saw looked like they would fit under a jacket very nicely. I have never used a Milwaukee jacket but like I said earlier I have several friends that use them and say they are great. For my type of riding I don’t think it would work very well-to much messing with dead batteries. For the past 21 years I been using a Gerbing liner that runs off my motorcycle battery and very rarely plug in unless the ride will be over 100 miles one way.
 

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It requires a lot of power to generate heat, and that will never change. Simple laws of physics. And motorcycles are more demanding of heated gear than any other activity, by far. Battery powered jackets serve a good, but limited purpose OFF the bike. Once you are in the wind, forget it. They provide much less heat out of necessity due to the limited available power. You would kill one of those batteries in 10 minutes if the jacket required the same power as a wired jacket.


I installed a 12 volt gel cell battery on my snow thrower so that I could use my Gerbings liner and gloves. (About the size of a computer UPS backup battery.) I am nice and toasty while wearing it. But even that big, heavy battery is nearly fully discharged by the time I get done with the driveway. That should give a good idea of the differences between them.



Someday it might be feasible, but energy densities of batteries will probably have to improve by a good 10 times more capacity to become useful on a motorcycle.
 

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@Sparky57, you may exactly right. No doubt a corded anything is going to run longer and ultimately stronger as you say.

However, I recall some of the same arguments about cordless drills, then sawzalls, then circular saws. Today, unless you’re a professional, it’s unlikely you’d buy a corded tool for just about anything. I still have my corded tools from before battery tools were good enough. Battery power has come a long way in the last five years.

As I said, I’m in Houston. I’m an amateur when it comes to cold compared to cycledude and the many others from other northern locales (“professionals” in my book). I wouldn’t expect a battery power heated vest to perform the same as a corded one, but I don’t need that power.

But input from cycledude and the others from up north is appreciated and considered.
 

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I've been to Texas - I *know* it gets cold there! :lol:

If this intended to be worn mostly for riding the bike, bite the bullet & get 12V gear. A jacket liner alone will be sufficient for most travel you'll do on two wheels.
 

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Thank you for the reminder here: I JUST PLUGGED MY BATTERY CHARGER INTO WALL SOCKET, along with my ski boot warmers..to be recharged, they have been sitting around uncharged for many, many months, maybe over a year............Hope they work, after all this time

Ronnie
 

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While we're discussing Li-Ion and rechargeable battery powered goodies there are some warnings on them. If these batteries are not fully charged or nearly so, and stored in the garage the freezing temperatures will ruin them. I have a box of batteries and chargers I keep inside the house as I wonder care to replace the batteries for my tools, etc. The same goes for comm systems, heated gear, rechargeables of any type. They accept the cold better when fully charged or actually in use. My drills batteries are over $50 a piece, I have no idea what the cost would be to replace the batteries in my Sena components.

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@Sparky57 , you may exactly right. No doubt a corded anything is going to run longer and ultimately stronger as you say.

However, I recall some of the same arguments about cordless drills, then sawzalls, then circular saws. Today, unless you’re a professional, it’s unlikely you’d buy a corded tool for just about anything. I still have my corded tools from before battery tools were good enough. Battery power has come a long way in the last five years.

As I said, I’m in Houston. I’m an amateur when it comes to cold compared to cycledude and the many others from other northern locales (“professionals” in my book). I wouldn’t expect a battery power heated vest to perform the same as a corded one, but I don’t need that power.

But input from cycledude and the others from up north is appreciated and considered.
Your point that this needs to be kept in perspective is certainly something that has to be considered. Those of us up north should not forget that.

The primary point I am trying to convey however is that it isn't just temperature you are fighting. It is wind, and that is arguably more significant when it comes to heated gear than the actual ambient temperature. The amount of air moving across your jacket is the same in Minnesota as it is in Texas. Movement of air sucks heat away from your clothing much faster than cold stagnant air does. This is why fans work so well on heat sinks in electronics. I can put a fan on a heat sink in the lab that is too hot to even touch in stagnant air, and have it ice cold in seconds with a fan. This convection cooling is a benefit when trying to reduce heat, but a hindrance when trying to maintain heat. This is the entire reason why companies that make portable heated gear for outdoorsmen and workers don't market them for motorcycles. It's a different world with different problems. Even at moderate temperatures, it takes a lot of energy and heat to overcome the effects of wind.

If you do decide to give this a try, it is imperative to wear a good windbreaker as an outer layer that will prevent air from reaching the heated liner. That will undoubtedly help more than a heavy insulated jacket. The Honda Millennium jacket is probably one of the best windbreakers ever made.
 

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Intended to include this in my prior response...

If you do any significant touring, having a heated jacket liner really doesn't take a lot of room if you're not using it. Two liners, and a pair of unheated ski pants all fit in about half a saddlebag...along with my tool bag, compressor, and a pair of off-bike shoes.

But, if you're touring, and happen along a cold front, have a ten, fifteen degree drop in temperature means you can remain comfortable. It only takes a couple of minutes to put it on, plug it in, and the ride continues.
 
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