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Unfortunately, the Deltran Battery Tender or Battery Tender Plus are not the best products to use. The problem with the Battery Tender Plus is that it reads the current battery voltage when it is first connected and thereafter will only maintain the battery at that charge level. My friend and I both independently confirmed this through practice and called the company to confirm it as well. I had a Battery Tender Plus and a Yuasa battery maintainer and the Yuasa did a better job. I replaced the Bettery Tender with an Optimate 4, which will actually attempt to repair a sulfated battery. Both of these products will fully charge the battery.
Letting a battery sit unused for a long period of time results in it being severely discharged. Even usaing the vehicle once a month can extend the battery's life.
That has not been my experience with my Battery Tender Plus+ units.

As long as the battery has 'some' charge, I've always been able to bring it back to full charge using one.

OTOH, with a completely dead battery it doesn't think it is connected -- so does nothing.
In that situation a plain ole trickle charger can be used to get 'some' charge into it.
This is the situation that was discussed at the start of this thread - use a trickle charger or good battery to get the 'dead' patient to have enough voltage for the tender to take over.

FWIW, I've had exactly the same issue with much larger batteries (not motorcycle / lawn mower / atv) and much larger chargers -- some of the new automatic chargers need to have a least 'some' charge/voltage on the battery before the charger will start the recharge process. An older charger -- the type that shouldn't be left on once the battery is charged -- can be used to get an initial partial charge.
 

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I've used Deltran Tenders since 2003, never had a problem. I didn't use one in Florida because I was riding often enough to keep the battery charged on my Shadow. But, a time came that I didn't ride for about three months. Went to start the bike and it struggled to start, but did. Riding it around and charged the battery and it did fine afterwards. But, decided using a tender was likely needed. I've kept all my bikes on tenders since. Lawn mowers, an Excursion I rarely use now is on a tender. Everyone does fine. I did have the tender once do the Red/Green alternating thing... turned out the battery was bad.

You don't really need a tender if you ride often enough to keep the battery charged... that's likely riding at least once or month or so. If your battery does fine without a tender.... you don't need it. If I road everyday, or certainly weekly, I'd never use one. And, if you're like Fluke and your battery is good for months at a time, you don't need it.

But, after my experience above I now use them. My wife can go months now between riding her GW and I have three bikes and I may not ride them all for months at a time. Other than the episode above, I've never gone out to find a bike with a dead battery once in 17 years....
 

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Great way to get stranded somewhere inconvenient.
What do you mean by that? I keep both my bikes plugged in to Battery Tenders whenever I am not riding, whether for overnight or for all winter long. If I know for sure that I am riding the very next day I might not bother plugging it in, but if unsure, its just a part of my routine when I get back to the garage, Clean the windscreen and headlights, hook up the Battery Tender cable. Has worked well for me for decades.
 
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What do you mean by that? I keep both my bikes plugged in to Battery Tenders whenever I am not riding, whether for overnight or for all winter long. If I know for sure that I am riding the very next day I might not bother plugging it in, but if unsure, its just a part of my routine when I get back to the garage, Clean the windscreen and headlights, hook up the Battery Tender cable. Has worked well for me for decades.
What I meant by that is if a person nurses along a dying battery or alternator by keeping it charged constantly or "tendered" then you will find out only on a longer (possibly away from home or in a remote area like I often ride) ride that the battery or alternator is not up to par.
 

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Interesting ideas. Never had a Battery Tender brand product leave a battery discharged after reading the initial voltage, and never had a dying battery hidden by being "tended".

Cell phone batteries wear out due to charge/discharge cycles, so if motorcycle batteries are the same in that way, it seems that keeping it topped off is probably better for it than letting it discharge between rides.
 

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Interesting ideas. Never had a Battery Tender brand product leave a battery discharged after reading the initial voltage, and never had a dying battery hidden by being "tended".

Cell phone batteries wear out due to charge/discharge cycles, so if motorcycle batteries are the same in that way, it seems that keeping it topped off is probably better for it than letting it discharge between rides.
I've yet to have mine ever discharge to any noticeable degree even after a month of inactivity. During the long "off season" every month or so I try to rotate the chargers/tenders on the many various batteries. Most healthy batteries I check/test drop less than a volt during that time lapse. Bring them up to full charge and disconnect and move on to the next one.
Whatever works for you, I guess.
 
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Now that we all know, what these charge'rr do, OR don't do, and we all gotta agree, "It's as clear as mud" NOW! .....................Right??? Has anybody actually changed their minds, after reading this post, on what to do with their Battery tenders????
If I connect it to my battery, I will not keep it on continuely, after a day, I just UNplug it..........

Ronnie
 

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I've yet to have mine ever discharge to any noticeable degree even after a month of inactivity. During the long "off season" every month or so I try to rotate the chargers/tenders on the many various batteries. Most healthy batteries I check/test drop less than a volt during that time lapse. Bring them up to full charge and disconnect and move on to the next one.
Whatever works for you, I guess.
Hopefully much less than a volt... If a battery drops a volt, it's pretty near dead.

Battery Discharge Voltage Chart
 

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Now that we all know, what these charge'rr do, OR don't do, and we all gotta agree, "It's as clear as mud" NOW! .....................Right??? Has anybody actually changed their minds, after reading this post, on what to do with their Battery tenders????
If I connect it to my battery, I will not keep it on continuely, after a day, I just UNplug it..........

Ronnie
Ronnie... you understand that this is the "sling mud" forum... no one agrees on anything... but everyone has an opinion and are always quick to state, "that's just my opinion... " as if it would be anything else. I don't know why people keep saying that ... one of my pet peeves.

Defeats the purpose of a "tender" if you only leave it on the bike one day and then unplug it. Then, you are doing the monitoring and the work the tender is designed to do ....

I've never had an issue with these devices. I know in Montana I have left the tender on my CBR1000RR for over a year without starting the bike... and the battery worked fine when I finally fired it up... Took it for a spin the other day to roll it over 12,000 miles total on the odo.

I've left them on the GW's in Montana for over six months never even checking on the bikes until Spring and the batteries were always good to go.

Now in New Mexico... and I ride much more often. But, when I'm working the bikes are stored and on a tender. No issues since moving here. I did replace both GW batteries this year as they were over 5 years old.

There's really no debate here... Do you NEED a battery tender?.. No.

If you ride often enough, likely your battery never gets significantly discharged.

If you do have gaps in riding and have found your battery weak upon starting (or dead for that matter) you should consider getting a tender.
 

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I was watching an episode of Jay Leno's Garage. The camera rolled past a line of Leno's collector cars. Each one was connected to a Deltran Battery Tender. But what the hell does he know about long term vehicle storage?

I have both a Deltran Battery Tender Plus and an OptiMate 3. Both are designed to MAINTAIN the charge of stored batteries and have computerized systems to monitor the state of the battery and supply a trickle charge when appropriate.

They are designed to be attached to batteries in storage, plugged in and left attached.

For those of you who say you've never used nor needed one and your battery lasted 25 years, great. Keep doing what you're doing. For those of you confusing a 1960's era trickle charger with a modern trickle/MAINTENANCE charger, do some homework and inform yourselves on how these differ from the traditional trickle charger.

Where I live, we get 5 months of Winter. Almost everybody I know with powersports equipment plugs their charger/MAINTAINERS in and leaves them on all Winter.

Tim
 

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I guess if I had Jays resources I could have a Tender on every parked/stored battery, as well as a nice cozy place to store each vehicle/boat/bike/snowmobile/ATV. Instead of having a dozen (or more tenders) I have to make due with two and do my diligence and rotate them thru the fleet every now and then year around depending on the seasonal use situations. When/if my battery lifespans show that the current program isn't working then it might be time to consider alternate course.
 

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do you just assume that your tender/maintainer is modifying current properly or do you confirm this and if so, how ? I'm wondering how many individuals buy a name brand rather than a amazon cheapo and then just assume it is cutting off when it should. Keeping in mind that they are all probably made in China.

You can find bad reviews on all of the name brands (Deltran, OptiMate, NOCO) so what should we be doing to ensure that we are not shortening the life of our batteries?
 

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I guess if I had Jays resources I could have a Tender on every parked/stored battery, as well as a nice cozy place to store each vehicle/boat/bike/snowmobile/ATV. Instead of having a dozen (or more tenders) I have to make due with two and do my diligence and rotate them thru the fleet every now and then year around depending on the seasonal use situations. When/if my battery lifespans show that the current program isn't working then it might be time to consider alternate course.
I was addressing the issue of leaving a battery tender/MAINTAINER attached to the vehicle and leaving it plugged in for long lengths of time, since some folks believe that is not advisable. Of course one rotates their chargers if one has more vehicles than chargers. That goes without saying.

I attach my battery tenders/maintainers to my motorcycle and 'summer car' and leave them attached and plugged in all winter. It works for me.

As for the previous poster's question, yes, I trust my Deltran Battery Tender Plus and OptMate 3 are working properly and have never even considered testing them to confirm they are performing correctly.

Tim
 

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Hook up a volt meter and make sure the volts are holding at about 13.1-13.2 after the charger is switched to storage charge. If your charger stays higher, you are cooking the battery to some extent. So it is constantly charging the battery regardless of brand 24hrs a day as long as it's connected. They never "shut off", they just drop to this low volts condition that holds at the 13.1-13.2v level and at that point the charging is very minimal, but still there the entire time the charger is hooked up. I'm still not convinced this is a good thing.
 

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I have a Deltran Battery Tender hooked up to my Honda Talon when it's parked, and it has a digital voltmeter I installed and periodically check it with the flip of a switch, and it's never below 12.5 volts, and will sometimes go up to near 13v. This tells me that the circuit is modulating the charging and maintaining the battery as prescribed.
 

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do you just assume that your tender/maintainer is modifying current properly or do you confirm this and if so, how ? I'm wondering how many individuals buy a name brand rather than a amazon cheapo and then just assume it is cutting off when it should. Keeping in mind that they are all probably made in China.

You can find bad reviews on all of the name brands (Deltran, OptiMate, NOCO) so what should we be doing to ensure that we are not shortening the life of our batteries?
i just had a lightning strike on my garage, (which I was lucky enough to witness), sparks flew from numerous places and exploded a couple of things. The Deltran BT Plus was connected to the bike.

I have a small digital voltmeter mounted in my right speaker, I have it on switched power along with the GPS, so that I can turn them on without starting the bike. Generally have the voltmeter switched on when charging so I can easily monitor what the charger is doing. After the lightning strike noticed that it was reading 15+ volts think I saw 16.

I now have a new Deltran BT+.

Hook up a volt meter and make sure the volts are holding at about 13.1-13.2 after the charger is switched to storage charge. If your charger stays higher, you are cooking the battery to some extent. So it is constantly charging the battery regardless of brand 24hrs a day as long as it's connected. They never "shut off", they just drop to this low volts condition that holds at the 13.1-13.2v level and at that point the charging is very minimal, but still there the entire time the charger is hooked up. I'm still not convinced this is a good thing.
 

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I guess if I had Jays resources I could have a Tender on every parked/stored battery, as well as a nice cozy place to store each vehicle/boat/bike/snowmobile/ATV. Instead of having a dozen (or more tenders) I have to make due with two and do my diligence and rotate them thru the fleet every now and then year around depending on the seasonal use situations. When/if my battery lifespans show that the current program isn't working then it might be time to consider alternate course.
If you had Jay's resources.... it's always conflicting to me when folks state they apparently do have the resources to own a "fleet" of machines, but spending $35 on each one for for a tender would be prohibitive. I think it's just your preference to rotate the tenders... works for you. I've done it as well in the past... but eventually just got a tender for each bike.

... so what should we be doing to ensure that we are not shortening the life of our batteries?
RIDE your bike... worry not about needing a tender. I have no reason to think a tender does damage a battery... in 17 years I've had ONE battery go bad while sitting on a tender for months. The battery was over 5 years old, so no reason to think the tender did it.

If one is concerned about these devices... don't use one. Not even remotely required. Find your battery weak or dead at some point... go buy a new one.
 

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Great way to get stranded somewhere inconvenient.
I've been plugging my 2006 Titanium Wing in every time I park it and leaving it plugged in and even here in the Arizona desert, I get about 4 yrs to a battery. The battery tender goes green when it's charged and just trickle charges to keep it topped off. I may be wrong, but it's worked out for me since 2006 doing it this way.

Matt
 
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During the summer, I plug in sometimes. when I return from a ride............ BUT winter storage I keep it plugged all winter long, till spring arrives, and I 'm ready to ride it again..BUT when winter storage, time comes, I have totally winterize this machine... Oil / filter replaced, new radiator fluid, additive added to a full tank of fuel, wash/wax'd, all three wheels off cement floor, and then it's plug in for the long season, and I pull out my snow skies, and head for the mountains.........THINK SNOW!!!

Ronnie
 
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Think snow
 
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