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Discussion Starter #1
In my car, I pulled up behind an older rider on an Electra Glide who was stopped at a light. He had his weight on his right foot, left foot on the left floorboard, left turn signal on. I thought, "That's interesting," because the "standard" technique is to pre-lean the bike toward the left. When the light changed, this old guy on his old bike just zoomed left. I had to accelerate at a good clip to keep up. Impressive.

Then, this old guy was ROCK STEADY and straight on to the next stop light. Now, most bikers, cruiser riders, sport bike riders, even Gold Wing riders, wobble all over the place. He was a ROCK. Then the light turned red and, still dead solid, this guy's brake lights came on with a Wig Wag pattern and extra lights. "Ah!" I said, "So this guy is a REAL rider and probably a former motor officer! Why would I think that? Casual riders simply don't ride like that, and they certainly don't put $200 worth of flashing brake lights on their Friday Night Bar Hopping bike.

It was just a kick to watch this guy ride, even for just a few minutes. I was very surprised how this man's skill would be so clear to see, literally, between two traffic lights. Well done, Stranger!

:thumbup:

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Yea but..."best Harley rider ever"? From two stoplights observance? I think that defines hyperbole. Rhetoric for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hyperbole? I would never, ever use a word I can't even spell! :lol: Especially not in a headline.
 

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??? When I stop I put the weight on my right foot and have 4 different brake deceleration lights. I am right handed and that seems the natural way to do it.
 

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In my car, I pulled up behind an older rider on an Electra Glide who was stopped at a light. He had his weight on his right foot, left foot on the left floorboard, left turn signal on. I thought, "That's interesting," because the "standard" technique is to pre-lean the bike toward the left. When the light changed, this old guy on his old bike just zoomed left. I had to accelerate at a good clip to keep up. Impressive.

Then, this old guy was ROCK STEADY and straight on to the next stop light. Now, most bikers, cruiser riders, sport bike riders, even Gold Wing riders, wobble all over the place. He was a ROCK. Then the light turned red and, still dead solid, this guy's brake lights came on with a Wig Wag pattern and extra lights. "Ah!" I said, "So this guy is a REAL rider and probably a former motor officer! Why would I think that? Casual riders simply don't ride like that, and they certainly don't put $200 worth of flashing brake lights on their Friday Night Bar Hopping bike.

It was just a kick to watch this guy ride, even for just a few minutes. I was very surprised how this man's skill would be so clear to see, literally, between two traffic lights. Well done, Stranger!
We're supposed to do that? Thanks for the education.
 

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Now, most bikers, cruiser riders, sport bike riders, even Gold Wing riders, wobble all over the place.
Let me know where you live so I can avoid that area if that's how everyone around you rides !! :eek:4:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Let me know where you live so I can avoid that area if that's how everyone around you rides !!
:eek:4:
Sad, but true! LOL. Be careful in the central Piedmont section of North Carolina. We're a bunch of flat landers here. We have to weave all over the road or we wouldn't have any curves at all. :lol:

PS
I tried this guy's turning-from-a-stop technique and I think I see why it works. By putting the inside foot up on the peg before starting, you have no worries about catching your foot on a saddlebag or having it get in the way while you are leaning over and accelerating from a stop. With the inside foot tucked safely out of the way, you can turn as fast and as far as you care to. If you "prelean" the bike with your inside foot, you must get your foot up quickly, or start off very carefully. I had no trouble resting my weight on the outside foot, then getting the bike to quickly flop over to the other side and GO!
 

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since he is an older rider, possibly learned on an old Harley when they had side shifters

as for the standard technique.....you are correct.....riding schools teach the 3 point stance (front tire, rear tire & left foot) at a stop. Right foot stays on the foot peg & rear brake for stability....bike is in 1st gear at all times, ready to move when needed
 

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since he is an older rider, possibly learned on an old Harley when they had side shifters

as for the standard technique.....you are correct.....riding schools teach the 3 point stance (front tire, rear tire & left foot) at a stop. Right foot stays on the foot peg & rear brake for stability....bike is in 1st gear at all times, ready to move when needed
That is the way i do it ,as i hold the brake with my right foot.But i can see what he is doing would also work,as i have had my foot hit by the saddle bag a few times when getting lazy or tired.( left turns only,right turns are fine)
 

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Yea but..."best Harley rider ever"? From two stoplights observance? I think that defines hyperbole. Rhetoric for sure.
My first reaction was to the thread title. I expected another H-D bash. I was wrong though I wonder what the brand of motorcycle has to do with the skill of the rider.
 

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It has a lot to do with road surface, (groovy, sloped ) and if there's a car tire on the bike. I have a car tire on the rear rim, for longer life, and comfort for my passenger, my wife. But it does move the bike around on uneven surfaces at slow speeds.
 

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I'm a little surprised you found that so impressive. I think most any experienced rider would be rock solid taking off and stopping at a light or a stop sign. Making a left or right turn from a stop would be normal. Maybe its just me, but I must be missing something.
 

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Actually the title of this post shouldn't be best HARLEY rider ever, if he's that good he can do it on any bike.
I agree, most riders that have any time in the saddle should be steady on take ofs be it straight or turning. Once you start to move your foot should automaticvally go on the pegs.
 
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