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Being new to the board and very interested in going to the darkside, I was wondering what is the best size tire to get for the rear wheel. I put new tires on the wing last June and then almost 10,000 miles on this set and I will need tires later this year. A car tire is a real possibility this time and I am looking for advice and input. Thanks to everyone in advance!
 

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Being new to the board and very interested in going to the darkside, I was wondering what is the best size tire to get for the rear wheel. I put new tires on the wing last June and then almost 10,000 miles on this set and I will need tires later this year. A car tire is a real possibility this time and I am looking for advice and input. Thanks to everyone in advance!
I run a Continental Vanco II 195/65R16 .. It is a very strong tire with stiff sidewalls, will support the bike at zero pressure. It looks to be a very long life tire, I expect to get over 40,000 miles on it, I have 15K on it right now

Good luck

JMHO :cool:


 

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I have a 195/55/16 Kumho run flat with 27k on it and it's about wore out. I will be getting another one just like it in a few weeks to replace it with. We don't have a lot of twisties in Fla so it don't get a lot of side wear. I keep it at 28 to 30psi. This tire is an all seasons type tire and wears well in hot weather. Some of the winter tires are softer and will wear quickly in the hot summer months.
 

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Using only the posts above, I see that 1 is using a 55 and the other a 65 (while other folks use a 60) aspect tire. What is the difference; i.e. height, width, grip, wearability, traction, etc? I love the twisties when I can get to them, but the majority of my riding is just putting around back roads in an effort to stimulate the economy (and helping the environment) by wasting gas and killing slow moving bugs. I have a Kumbo coming, but just curious about the aspect ratio differences. Thanks!
 

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From: http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=46
A Guide to Tire Sizes




Lea esta página en español
The tire size branded on the sidewall provides a significant amount of information about the tire's intended purpose, dimensions, load capacity and high temperature/high speed durability.
Our primary example will be based on variations of the 225/50R16 size, although other sizes will appear where appropriate.
Service Type

Most tire sizes begin with a letter or letters that identify the type of vehicle and/or type of service for which they were designed. The common indicators are as follows:
P225/50R16 91S
P = When a tire size begins with a "P," it signifies the tire is a "P-metric" size that was designed to be fitted on vehicles that are primarily used as passenger vehicles. This includes cars, minivans, sport utility vehicles and light duty pickup trucks (typically 1/4- and 1/2-ton load capacity). The use of P-metric sizes began in the late 1970s and they are the most frequently used type of tire size today.
225/50R16 92S
If there isn't a letter preceding the three-digit numeric portion of a tire size, it signifies the tire is a "Metric" size (also called "Euro-metric" because these sizes originated in Europe). While Metric tire sizes are primarily used on European cars, they are also used on vans and sport utility vehicles. Euro-metric sizes are dimensionally equivalent to P-metric sizes, but typically differ subtly in load carrying capabilities.
T125/90D16 98M
T = If a tire size begins with a "T," it signifies the tire is a "Temporary Spare" ("space saver" or "mini spare") that was designed to be used temporarily only until a flat tire can be repaired or replaced.
LT245/75R16 108/104S
LT = If a tire size begins with "LT," it signifies the tire is a "Light Truck-metric" size that was designed to be used on vehicles that are capable of carrying heavy cargo or towing large trailers. This includes medium and heavy-duty (typically 3/4- and 1-ton load capacity) pickup trucks, sport utility vehicles and full-size vans. Tires branded with the "LT" designation are the "little brothers" of 18-wheel tractor-trailer tires and are designed to provide substantial reserve capacity to accept the additional stresses of carrying heavy cargo.
7.50R16LT 112/107Q, 8.75R16.5LT 104/100Q or 31x10.50R15LT 109Q
LT = If a tire ends with "LT," it signifies the tire is either an earlier "Numeric", "Wide Base" or "Flotation" Light Truck size designed to be used on vehicles that are capable of carrying heavy cargo and towing trailers (Numeric sizes), use 16.5-inch diameter rims (Wide Base sizes) or are wider, oversized tires designed to help the vehicle drive on top of loose dirt or sandy surfaces (Flotation sizes). This includes light, medium and heavy-duty (typically 1/2-, 3/4 and 1-ton load capacity) pickup trucks and sport utility vehicles. Tires branded with the "LT" at the end of their size designation are also the "little brothers" of 18-wheel tractor-trailer tires and are designed to provide substantial reserve capacity to accept the additional stresses of carrying heavy cargo.
195/70R15C 104/102R
C = If a Euro-metric sized tire ends with a "C," it signifies the tire is a "Commercial" tire intended to be used on vans or delivery trucks that are capable of carrying heavy loads. In addition to being branded with the "C" in their size, these tires are also branded with their appropriate Service Description and "Load Range" (Load Range B, Load Range C or Load Range D).
ST225/75R15
ST = If a tire size begins with "ST," it signifies the tire is a "Special Trailer Service" size that was designed to only be used on boat, car or utility trailers. ST-sized tires should never be used on cars, vans or light trucks.
Section Width

Following the letter(s) that identify the type of vehicle and/or type of service for which the tire was designed, the three-digit numeric portion identifies the tire's "Section Width" (cross section) in millimeters.
P225/50R16 91S
The 225 indicates this tire is 225 millimeters across from the widest point of its outer sidewall to the widest point of its inner sidewall when mounted and measured on a specified width wheel. This measurement is also referred to as the tire's section width. Because many people think of measurements in inches, the 225mm can be converted to inches by dividing the section width in millimeters by 25.4 (the number of millimeters per inch).
225mm / 25.4 = 8.86"
Sidewall Aspect Ratio

Typically following the three digits identifying the tire's Section Width in millimeters is a two-digit number that identifies the tire's profile or aspect ratio.
P225/50R16 91S
The 50 indicates that this tire size's sidewall height (from rim to tread) is 50% of its section width. The measurement is the tire's section height, and also referred to as the tire's series, profile or aspect ratio. The higher the number, the taller the sidewall; the lower the number, the lower the sidewall. We know that this tire size's section width is 225mm and that its section height is 50% of 225mm. By converting the 225mm to inches (225 / 25.4 = 8.86") and multiplying it by 50% (.50) we confirm that this tire size results in a tire section height of 4.43". If this tire were a P225/70R16 size, our calculation would confirm that the size would result in a section height of 6.20", approximately a 1.8-inch taller sidewall.
Internal Construction
 

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While I think KA7W is a valuable test pilot, it should be noted that the tire he is running does rub the swingarm does it not? I know it will wear down to where it doesn't do that anymore but to a new car tire user, I wouldn't want any surprises.
 

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Being new to the board and very interested in going to the darkside, I was wondering what is the best size tire to get for the rear wheel. I put new tires on the wing last June and then almost 10,000 miles on this set and I will need tires later this year. A car tire is a real possibility this time and I am looking for advice and input. Thanks to everyone in advance!

First "wingking51" Welcome to the Darkside..May the force protect you from the uneducated naysayers..:thumbup:

About tire size..The most popular car tire size that most of use are running and that is the 195/55/16.It is the same size as the stock tire.
So no speedo changes will be seen.

Some try different sizes to over come the factory speedo error with a taller 205/55/16,It helps but not eliminate the speedo error.

There is a new Dunlop on the scene that some are trying 175/60/16 but is a winter compound.But it is a little smaller in diameter than the stock motorcycle tire.
 

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While I think KA7W is a valuable test pilot, it should be noted that the tire he is running does rub the swingarm does it not? I know it will wear down to where it doesn't do that anymore but to a new car tire user, I wouldn't want any surprises.
Yes it does touch the swing arm, leaves a black area maybe a tenth of a inch wide. Goes away pretty fast.

Today I found another continental vanco tire I want to try, it is smaller but just as tough

http://www.euroshina.com.ua/en/tyres/Continental/Vanco-2/size/175/75/R16/

I didn't do any calcualtions, but seems to me the tire diameter would be about the same as a 180/65 and the width would be less so no touching on the swingarm. I have a spare wheel with a old D250 on it, I think I will order this tire and give it a go... Speedo should be pretty close with it.

They also have a 185/75R16 available.. Which might be a good choice also..


JMHO :cool:


 

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Tire rub

I personally run a 205/60-16 and mine touched the swing arm above 70 the first ride. I backed off for a few seconds and went back up to 70 + again. It rubbed again dropped back again for a few seconds and increased up 70+ again and that time it did not rub. The way I could tell rub vs non-rub was I could smell it. I suspect it all depends on the tire as to weather they rub any or not. I hear there is one fellow that is running a 205/65-16 and said it did not rub. I never did find out what make tire it was though.

I started with 32 psi and now I am running 34 and it is an exceptional ride. I also use 3 oz of dynabeads Also the circumference of my CT is 80.5 inches vs the MT of 76. This correct my speedo from reading 4 fast to 2 fast. An aspect ratio of 65 would have put it right on but with the particular tire I used my circumference would have be 83.4 which would have not worked in the 205 series.

Hope this helps with your decision.:thumbup:
 

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195/55/16 Kumho here! Good luck on your choice. I think the majority uses the same.I've only been running this tire for 1,500mi +. I'm still a beginner but a Happy Camper!
 

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Yes it does touch the swing arm, leaves a black area maybe a tenth of a inch wide. Goes away pretty fast.

Today I found another continental vanco tire I want to try, it is smaller but just as tough

http://www.euroshina.com.ua/en/tyres/Continental/Vanco-2/size/175/75/R16/

I didn't do any calcualtions, but seems to me the tire diameter would be about the same as a 180/65 and the width would be less so no touching on the swingarm. I have a spare wheel with a old D250 on it, I think I will order this tire and give it a go... Speedo should be pretty close with it.

They also have a 185/75R16 available.. Which might be a good choice also..


JMHO :cool:
Where do you pick up this tyre in the States or do you import from the UK. Cheers...:doorag:
 
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