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A couple of things happening here.
One cupping can and does happen with CT or MC tires on the rear. Many arguments have been made about why cupping happens, air pressure, balance, handling... but what seems to happen is whatever the initial cause the cupping accelerates the issue and also then creates secondary cups. The stress continues to be applied to that one spot then after cup causes a bounce, greater stress is again applied elsewhere on the tire.

Two is the road crown effect. All roads are crowned and since we are here in North America we drive on the right side of the road. So to stay upright and in the center of the lane we are in essence always driving on the side of a hill. This produces more wear to the left side of the tires. Exception to this is on a multi lane road where the crown is slopes to the left. MT tires are softer on the sides so once you eat away the harder center rubber this effect will accelerate.

Three yes CT are designed to try to stay flat. They will influence the style of turn you make on a bike and I add a little push to the handle bar while making turns instead of just the lean. This seems to work well with darkside riding. The added rigidity of the runflat sidewall magnifys the stay flat desire of the tire.

So will CT cause cupping in the front possibly but more likely it caused lateral stress on the front tire combined with road crowning exposing the soft rubber on the tire allowing for cupping.
 

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I also noticed a pull to the right soon after I bought my 2018 Tour DCT. The following is from my post on another forum in September of 2018. I believe the cause was from the front axle not being seated correctly from the factory. After wheel removal and installation, the bike goes down the road with no issues pulling left or right.

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I ordered the 2018 Service Manual to see what it had to say about troubleshooting motorcycle pulls to one side. I also ordered a static wheel balancer, as I noticed there were no weights on either the front or rear wheel. I find the whole wheels not being balanced interesting, as a new low end car coming from Honda has all four wheels balanced when you take possession of the vehicle. Anyway, I took the front and rear wheel off the bike and balanced them, not really too bad 1/4 ounce for each wheel. I then performed the following method I found on a YouTube video and compared it to the Service Manual procedure, the overall concept is the same, but the steps are a little different. After getting this all accomplished, I am glad to report that the bike now tracks true down the road.

Removal
1: put bike on center stand
2: insert steering centering pin
3: raise front wheel
4: loosen and remove axle bolt
5: loosen all 4 pinch bolts
6: loosen and remove brake caliper bolts and calipers, support calipers with bungee cords
7: slide out axle and remove front wheel

Installation
1: insert front wheel and slide in axle
2: hand tighten free leg pinch bolts, enough to stop axle from turning while torqueing axle nut, torque axle nut to 44 ft/lb
3: loosen free leg pinch bolts
4: fit brake calipers, install bolts to finger tight
5: spin wheel, activate front brake to align pads and calipers, repeat several times, then hold front brake lever firmly. A zip tie or Velcro strap maybe handy for this operation
6: torque caliper bolts (both sides) to 31 ft/lb, release front brake
7: spin front wheel to test, repeat several times, front wheel should spin freely
8: torque pinch bolts on captive leg to 16 ft/lb
9: lower front wheel to ground, do not use front brake, get on bike, stand on driver foot pegs, push up and down on handle bars mounts next to triple tree to center/seat axle
10: torque pinch bolts on free leg to 16 ft/lb
11: raise front wheel and test wheel spin

The lug nut torque for the rear wheel is 80 ft/lb
 

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The last cupped tire I had was when I had a set of Metzlers. Since being darkside, nary a one in over 50 sets of tires. Something else I haven't seen mentioned here is your seating position. I had a similar complaint about mine pulling to the right and couldn't be determined, until a rider behind me noticed that I wasn't seated in the center of the saddle. To me, it felt I was seated in the center, but looking at his videos, I could clearly see that I wasn't. I was favoring the right side which more pull to the right. Hope you get it figured out.
 

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I also noticed a pull to the right soon after I bought my 2018 Tour DCT. The following is from my post on another forum in September of 2018. I believe the cause was from the front axle not being seated correctly from the factory. After wheel removal and installation, the bike goes down the road with no issues pulling left or right.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I ordered the 2018 Service Manual to see what it had to say about troubleshooting motorcycle pulls to one side. I also ordered a static wheel balancer, as I noticed there were no weights on either the front or rear wheel. I find the whole wheels not being balanced interesting, as a new low end car coming from Honda has all four wheels balanced when you take possession of the vehicle. Anyway, I took the front and rear wheel off the bike and balanced them, not really too bad 1/4 ounce for each wheel. I then performed the following method I found on a YouTube video and compared it to the Service Manual procedure, the overall concept is the same, but the steps are a little different. After getting this all accomplished, I am glad to report that the bike now tracks true down the road.

Removal
1: put bike on center stand
2: insert steering centering pin
3: raise front wheel
4: loosen and remove axle bolt
5: loosen all 4 pinch bolts
6: loosen and remove brake caliper bolts and calipers, support calipers with bungee cords
7: slide out axle and remove front wheel

Installation
1: insert front wheel and slide in axle
2: hand tighten free leg pinch bolts, enough to stop axle from turning while torqueing axle nut, torque axle nut to 44 ft/lb
3: loosen free leg pinch bolts
4: fit brake calipers, install bolts to finger tight
5: spin wheel, activate front brake to align pads and calipers, repeat several times, then hold front brake lever firmly. A zip tie or Velcro strap maybe handy for this operation
6: torque caliper bolts (both sides) to 31 ft/lb, release front brake
7: spin front wheel to test, repeat several times, front wheel should spin freely
8: torque pinch bolts on captive leg to 16 ft/lb
9: lower front wheel to ground, do not use front brake, get on bike, stand on driver foot pegs, push up and down on handle bars mounts next to triple tree to center/seat axle
10: torque pinch bolts on free leg to 16 ft/lb
11: raise front wheel and test wheel spin

The lug nut torque for the rear wheel is 80 ft/lb
So which is the "free leg"? TIA.
 

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That is excellent news mlboland115 So very glad you were able to get it sorted. This should help many others as well. I have heard of at least a handful of others whom had the same hard right pull. I do find your wheels/tires not being balanced interesting, that could cause a whole other set of problems like cupping/unnecessary tire wear as well. It made me go out and look at my bike, and it indeed does have wheel weights. Whether that is from factory or part of dealer PDS I cannot say.

INTHEWIND - The free leg is the side of the axle that does not have the axle nut/bolt. First time I saw that reference was in the shop manual for my 2000 Honda RS250R. It has been used since that type of front end axle arrived but I had never seen it in writing until then.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
A couple of things happening here.
One cupping can and does happen with CT or MC tires on the rear. Many arguments have been made about why cupping happens, air pressure, balance, handling... but what seems to happen is whatever the initial cause the cupping accelerates the issue and also then creates secondary cups. The stress continues to be applied to that one spot then after cup causes a bounce, greater stress is again applied elsewhere on the tire.

Two is the road crown effect. All roads are crowned and since we are here in North America we drive on the right side of the road. So to stay upright and in the center of the lane we are in essence always driving on the side of a hill. This produces more wear to the left side of the tires. Exception to this is on a multi lane road where the crown is slopes to the left. MT tires are softer on the sides so once you eat away the harder center rubber this effect will accelerate.

Three yes CT are designed to try to stay flat. They will influence the style of turn you make on a bike and I add a little push to the handle bar while making turns instead of just the lean. This seems to work well with darkside riding. The added rigidity of the runflat sidewall magnifys the stay flat desire of the tire.

So will CT cause cupping in the front possibly but more likely it caused lateral stress on the front tire combined with road crowning exposing the soft rubber on the tire allowing for cupping.
Well written, perfectly logical! Thanks.
 

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Loosen axle cap nut slightly, then fork pinch bolts slightly. With the bike upright or on center stand, give the handlebars a few bounces while keeping them relatively straight forward. Torque the pinch bolts to spec, and then the axle nut. I do this anytime I have to remove the front tire. The bouncing while the bolts are only slightly tightened allows the fork lowers to align properly with the axle rod. I don’t know if this works on the newer bikes, but it helps on the 1st generation GL1800’s.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #50
26,000 miles on bike. Tires look ok (7,500 on front & 3,500 on rear), It is pulling hard right (like a car out of alignment). Regardless of road grade or wind condition. And bike is evenly loaded.
TODAY had following done to my bike:
1) New front tire (Metzeler me888)
2) Centramatic balancers installed
3) Front axle seated as per service manual procedure

When I rode bike home, it felt like the pulling right has been eliminated. But hard to tell today – winds were gusting up to 40 mph blowing bike all over the road.

When I went over a high bridge (over the intercoastal waterway) the wind was hitting me broadside and I had all I could handle to keep bike in my lane. Scary! Normally I do not ride in weather like that, but had an appointment with bike shop to get tire and balancers installed and did not want to cancel.

Will provide update after next (good weather) ride.

And to all who responded with suggestions - THANKS!
 

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Discussion Starter #51
1) New front tire (Metzeler me888)
2) Centramatic balancers installed
3) Front axle seated as per service manual procedure

Will provide update after next (good weather) ride.
Did some good weather riding.
BIke is running smooth, and not pulling right
 

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But, we shall never know why your pull was corrected.

"1) New front tire (Metzeler me888)
2) Centramatic balancers installed
3) Front axle seated as per service manual procedure"

Glad you got it resolved, though.

prs
 

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Discussion Starter #53
But, we shall never know why your pull was corrected.

"1) New front tire (Metzeler me888)
2) Centramatic balancers installed
3) Front axle seated as per service manual procedure"

Glad you got it resolved, though.

prs
I suspect the worn front tire was the main culprit. It had worn down more on the left side. Right side was noticeably "higher".
 
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