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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Is it possible to turn off/deactivate Hill Start Assist? Twice I have stalled it because I rolled on the throttle, eased out the clutch and let off the front brake only to have the bike go nowhere and stall. The second time it did it I caught a glimpse of the HSA light after I already stalled it. Both times was a major WTF event with the second one having a follow-up of "You *^$*&^%&^*". If you do not want it, do not need it, and actually know how to hold the front brake and give it all the throttle you need at the same time makes this is a horrible feature (and may be dangerous if unable to go when you must get out of someones way). You should be able to disable it from ever accidentally activating on you.
 

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I have never used mine yet.

This is from the manual for a manual bike.


Release the brake lever, and then open the throttle grip while releasing the clutch lever. (The HSA works about 3 seconds after releasing the brake lever)

It Sounds to me like it will hold the bike for 3 seconds after you release the brake everytime.
 

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Around home I never use it but it is a nice feature for those in the hills. I have used it multiple times without incident. Perhaps your dealer can resolve your issue. A number of people had similar issue unrelated to the HSA. I stalled my DCT a couple times when my bike was new but haven't had the issue again for quite awhile.
Hope you can find a solution quickly.
 

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The hill start assist feature should not engage if you DO NOT apply the brake firmly. On most any hill on public roads the grade is not so steep as to require such firm braking to keep bike still, so just gently apply the brake.

On my DCT version, the hill start assist seems to disengage immediately when the engine begins to move the bike.

prs
 
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The hill start assist feature should not engage if you DO NOT apply the brake firmly.
Agree. In order to activate the HSA, you need to give the brake a very firm pull after you've already brought the bike to a complete stop. If you don't give it this firm pull, it shouldn't activate.

I've got the manual transmission and have noticed that the clutch doesn't engage until the clutch handle is almost fully released. It took me a while to get used to this and I stalled the bike twice in the first month I had it. Now I'm used to it and it's not a problem.

When I use HSA (engaged), I completely release the front brake knowing that it will hold the brake for 3 seconds or until the clutch is engaged and bike is moving, which ever is sooner. I've always been able to engage the clutch and move along before the three seconds is up. After the OP is used to the clutch, this may no longer be an issue.
 

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I find it a bit hard to even activate the HSA. I'm sitting still and have to pull firmly on the front brake twice to get the HSA to activate...with the few times in the last year where the HSA would had been useful, I've forgotten to try to use the HSA while sitting on the incline...I could easily live without this feature.
 

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..... because I rolled on the throttle, eased out the clutch and let off the front brake only to have the bike go nowhere and stall.....

It is NOT intuitive to release the brakes on a steep hill before letting out the clutch, but this is EXACTLY what you must learn to do when the HSA is engaged.

Tony C has it right...
"When I use HSA (engaged), I completely release the front brake knowing that it will hold the brake for 3 seconds or until the clutch is engaged and bike is moving, which ever is sooner. I've always been able to engage the clutch and move along before the three seconds is up."
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I ended up seeing the HSA light on again, but I was able to get it off before I needed to take off. Releasing and re-applying the brake will release it. But I would rather watch a different light instead of the HSA light. The reason I am stalling it is that I am trying to take off as I release the front brake. This normally is a smooth transition, however, when the brake is held 3 seconds after I have already released it then the bike will not go anywhere and will be stalled. As far as how I am accidentally getting it set...... I have no idea. I have set it on purpose to see what activities can unset it. Back to accidentally setting.... I do not always hold the front brake nor do I always hold the rear, but I do tend to trade off one for the other while sitting at the same light. I have not been able to prove it in case it is mistaking my transition from rear to front as "wanting HSA". In any case, I would still rather just have it totally disabled an not worry about the next time I forget to keep an eye on that stupid light.
 

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On my DCT, I have to do a second pull of the brake after I come to a stop, then the HSA light comes on to activate it. When I accelerate, it automatically goes off. I love this feature, especially when riding two-up and have to stop on a steep hill. Makes taking off very smooth. Sounds like you may have a malfunction. I would get things checked out at dealer.
 

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Weren't some people adjusting the hsa to make it grip better? Could you adjust it the other way to make it slip?
 

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Weren't some people adjusting the hsa to make it grip better? Could you adjust it the other way to make it slip?
There is no way to make any sort of adjustment with the HSA.
 

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best practice is to NOT use the front brake, use rear brake only in everyday riding.
If for some reason you need extra help/control, then use your front brake, but as mentioned you need to pull hard on it to activate HSA
 

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best practice is to NOT use the front brake, use rear brake only in everyday riding.
If for some reason you need extra help/control, then use your front brake, but as mentioned you need to pull hard on it to activate HSA
I think I might know what you mean (do not use front brake in everyday stop on upward slope????), but if your advice is to be taken literally, it is WRONG. The front brake is almost all of your everyday brake power. Generally, on this bike, use the brakes simultaneously. For adding stability as in parking lot practice maneuvers the rear brake only can be used such as Jerry Paladino instructs. If I am stopped on an upward slope, I use the foot brake out of habit even though this bike has the HST feature -- BUT generally for every day riding it is the front brake that is your work horse.

prs
 

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I think I might know what you mean (do not use front brake in everyday stop on upward slope????), but if your advice is to be taken literally, it is WRONG. The front brake is almost all of your everyday brake power. Generally, on this bike, use the brakes simultaneously. For adding stability as in parking lot practice maneuvers the rear brake only can be used such as Jerry Paladino instructs. If I am stopped on an upward slope, I use the foot brake out of habit even though this bike has the HST feature -- BUT generally for every day riding it is the front brake that is your work horse.

prs
we all have our opinions, but I am not WRONG when stopped on a hill

I will agree that the front brake provides most of the braking in "normal" riding conditions, starts out with 70% braking and increases as the weight transfers onto the front wheel....but try to think of this....on a very steep uphill, when stopped, where the the weight transfer? to the back wheel...if one increases the angle of the hill to the extreme, there would be so much weight transferred to the rear wheel, if you only used the front brake, the bike could roll back as there is minimal if any weight on the front wheel = minimal if any braking force.

most good riding schools will teach new riders to use only the rear brake on a hill, it is much easier to use the right hand only on the throttle, right foot on the rear brake, when you want to proceed, slowly release rear brake as you roll on the throttle and release the clutch, one does not have to worry about rolling on the throttle & releasing the rear brake...remember the KISS principle?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Honda Stall Annoyance (HSA)

"Stall' I don't know what that means.>:)
Stall - Engine goes dead because it does not have enough fuel to overpower the brake being firmly held by HSA after you have released the brake and expect that the bike will be able to roll unimpeded.


There have been several comments about the HSA malfunctioning. It is not, it is doing exactly what it was designed to do. Only it does not have control of the clutch like a DCT does, so it only knows that it needs to hold the brake 3 seconds longer and then start releasing the brake if the throttle is no longer at idle. The problem is, I am in control of the clutch and throttle and those two items are already where they need to be when I release the brake, not when it does three seconds later. That causes the brake release to be very late in timing preventing a normal start off. It has fully released the brake right about the time RPM hits 0. HSA probably works flawlessly every time in a DCT because the rider only can control the throttle and all else keys totally off of that. Even accidental HSA engagement would go unnoticed because it will have the clutch-brake relationship perfect as you throttle up. Meanwhile, my manual tranny ends up with accidental HSA engagement causing a momentary loss of control of the brake leading to the engine stall. This is why I want it turned off, unable to engage.



This annoyance "feature" and the responses have really started making me think about putting together an instructional video on how your left hand alone can roll on as much throttle as you desire while firmly holding the front brake lever (even with all four fingers on the lever). Your thumb and lower palm are what is working the throttle and the ends of your fingers are on the lever with your knuckles managing the distance difference between the "roll" and lever location. Gloves should not prevent this ability. The only gloves that I have had that would not let me do this had a worse problem leading to major wrist pain because I had to have a total "death grip" on the throttle to keep it from throttling down sliding on the friction-less glove surface.
 

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we all have our opinions, but I am not WRONG when stopped on a hill

I will agree that the front brake provides most of the braking in "normal" riding conditions, starts out with 70% braking and increases as the weight transfers onto the front wheel....but try to think of this....on a very steep uphill, when stopped, where the the weight transfer? to the back wheel...if one increases the angle of the hill to the extreme, there would be so much weight transferred to the rear wheel, if you only used the front brake, the bike could roll back as there is minimal if any weight on the front wheel = minimal if any braking force.

most good riding schools will teach new riders to use only the rear brake on a hill, it is much easier to use the right hand only on the throttle, right foot on the rear brake, when you want to proceed, slowly release rear brake as you roll on the throttle and release the clutch, one does not have to worry about rolling on the throttle & releasing the rear brake...remember the KISS principle?
Then you are not WRONG! Which follows exactly what I posted above. What I thought about what you intended to say was right too. We are on same page. But, on a steep down slope, I do use my front brake when stopped and throttle brake coordination with the right hand is no problem, lots of practice in drag braking.

Thank you for clearing all that up!

prs
 
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I was guessing that the hill assist was using the parking brake. What do I know? At least I didn't assume. :)
The HSA applies pressure to the rear brake only. It does this by running the ABS modulator motor.

:doorag:
 

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Stall - Engine goes dead because it does not have enough fuel to overpower the brake being firmly held by HSA after you have released the brake and expect that the bike will be able to roll unimpeded.
.
I have a DCT, it doesn't stall. Tongue in cheek reply.:smile2:
 
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