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I have them on my 2018 and im not sold on them yet. The bike is so smooth to start with im not sure they are needed? I don't like the associated noises that come with them at low speed.
 
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Adding unsprung weight, even if it solves a problem, can create problems of its own.
Yes, you must also add unsprung weight to balance the tire / wheel combination, but the overall amount of unsprung weight is vastly different.
(I couldn't find a weight listed on the Centramatics site, but I would expect them to be an order of magnitude heavier than a standard wheel weight).
 

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I cant get my head around your reply.
Are you saying don't fit a balanced tyre/wheel to a hub as it creates problems?
 

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Adding unsprung weight, even if it solves a problem, can create problems of its own.
Yes, you must also add unsprung weight to balance the tire / wheel combination, but the overall amount of unsprung weight is vastly different.
(I couldn't find a weight listed on the Centramatics site, but I would expect them to be an order of magnitude heavier than a standard wheel weight).
I see no such improuvement with them .
 

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I don't use the centramatics, but I do use the balance beads that are inserted through the valve stem. The principal of operation is the same. AND I DONT THINK IT IS SNAKE OIL.
I use 2-3 oz beads in each tire. So its about the same as the balance weight. No real additional weight is added to the wheel. The beads are dynamic over the life of the tire. They are constantly adjusting. Static weights do not adjust. After some miles the tire should be removed and checked for balance. Before I started using the beads I always noticed some imbalance near the end of the tire life.
As for a extending the life of the tire. My seat of the pants assessment is that they work. I change my tires early. Well before the wear bars get close. I am on set # 14 for my bike. Most sets (Dunlop E-3) I get 12,000+ miles with tread left to spare. I don't ride all that aggressive and most of my miles are on the interstate. I am currently 8000 miles into the latest set of E-4. They show very little wear. The beads are cheap if you want to try. You can do both wheel for less than $30.
 

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. After some miles the tire should be removed and checked for balance.
Regually inspected for damage
I don't recall seeing that in any service manual.
Got a link?

Visually inspected for damage to rim and tyre..yes.
Rider awareness to new sounds or vibration coming from the wheels during operation ..yes.
Remove and checked for balance. nah.
 

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I cant get my head around your reply.
Are you saying don't fit a balanced tyre/wheel to a hub as it creates problems?
No, I'm saying adding a bunch of extra weight to the unsprung portions of your motorcycle create problems of their own.
The "centramatic" type balancers add significant weight to the unsprung portion of the motorcycle.
Anything you can do to keep the unsprung portion as light as possible is a positive. People can argue that "to balance the wheel / tire combination, you might have to add some weights", which is true, but the total amount of weight needed to balance the tire / wheel won't be anywhere near as much as the weight of the centramatic type balancer.
 

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I had them on my 2013. Worked great. Smooth as silk.

I got them because when I bought the bike the previous tire shop used the stick on weights and it compromised the clear coat when they removed them. I decided to not use any weights anymore and bought the centramatics. I didn’t want the beads. I since learned from my tire shop that they could of used the crimp on weights that go on the center ridge of the wheel.

On my 2018 I really don’t think they are worth the expense, complexity and weight anymore. I have no plans to put them on my 2018 even though the wheels don’t have the center ridge and I guess they will just use the stick on weights.
 

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No, I'm saying adding a bunch of extra weight to the unsprung portions of your motorcycle create problems of their own.
The "centramatic" type balancers add significant weight to the unsprung portion of the motorcycle.
Anything you can do to keep the unsprung portion as light as possible is a positive. People can argue that "to balance the wheel / tire combination, you might have to add some weights", which is true, but the total amount of weight needed to balance the tire / wheel won't be anywhere near as much as the weight of the centramatic type balancer.

Ah. Got what you are saying now.

I agree wholeheartedly.
 

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Some light reading about wheel weight the effects if enertia.

Ezec summary...........
* The lighter the wheels, the less your un-sprung mass. This means that your suspension has to work less to dampen the wheels. This will result in less energy and less power being consumed from the engine.
* It is more difficult to move or steer a rotating mass than a is stationary mass (try to move a spinning bicycle wheel ). If you reduce the mass and specifically the rotating inertia , the force required to move or steer the mass is reduced significantly. Putting lighter wheel s on your bike will reduce the steering forces a lot and therefore have a significant positive influence on driver fatigue. Try to workout in a gym with half the weight and see how much longer you can last.


I like to do stuff that enhances the performance and handling.
The opposite. Nah Not so much.

But each to their own I guess, its their ride.
 

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I wonder why then, if pushing my bike anywhere, it is harder to steer than when riding it a 5mph. Yes, I agree that the heavier the bike the harder it is to control. So you 200 pound guys have much more trouble than us 175 pound guys. I don't think an aluminum disc that ways less than 2 pounds is going to make much difference. And now I'm wondering if anyone has weighed the different tires they put on their bikes. Is an AVON heavier than a Bridgestone or Dunlop.
 

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I wonder why then, if pushing my bike anywhere, it is harder to steer than when riding it a 5mph. Yes, I agree that the heavier the bike the harder it is to control. So you 200 pound guys have much more trouble than us 175 pound guys. I don't think an aluminum disc that ways less than 2 pounds is going to make much difference. And now I'm wondering if anyone has weighed the different tires they put on their bikes. Is an AVON heavier than a Bridgestone or Dunlop.
Static friction. If your motorcycle is sitting still and you push the bars there is friction between the tire and the surface the tire is sitting on. If you are pushing the bike the fact that your bike is moving allows some of the static friction to go away, as the tire rolling allows some of the friction between the 2 surfaces to be relieved due to the fact that it is rolling. The faster it is rolling the less static friction there will be as the amount of angle needed per revolution keeps going down.
It isn't just a matter of weight. Weight being sprung vs unsprung makes a big difference.
We have shocks and springs and dampers for reasons other than rider comfort.
 

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I wonder why then, if pushing my bike anywhere, it is harder to steer than when riding it a 5mph. ......
If you take 2 minutes of your time and actually read the link in post #15 all your questions will be revealed. Ta Daah
 

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I put them on a set of oem Dunlop’s with 5k miles. Instantly smoother ride. Front tires were scalloped bad and now can’t even feel that vibration anymore. The disc weigh very little
 

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If you take 2 minutes of your time and actually read the link in post #15 all your questions will be revealed. Ta Daah
Yes unsprung weight is a thing, but it's not what the OP or anyone asked. I recently lost 15 pounds so my bike is now more nimble and has less inertia, but it's the only reason I would use to tell people to lose weight.............

Does anyone have any experience with the Centramatic wheel balancers for 2018+.
I drive a 2020 tour DCT.

Claims that the tires last longer since they do not go out of balance as the tire wears down, ie reduces cupping, etc...
https://www.centramatic.com/wheel-balancer.rhtml?modelNumber=MGW100-118
I think there are enough examples giving good experiences, but what about the first hand bad experiences?

Going to pull the trigger myself, but want to make sure I'm not overlooking something. My goal isn't tire life, it's simplicity. Change tires with neighbors no-mar and ride. No wheel cleaning, no weights, no balancing, no in-tire balancing goo or beads, just mount and go.
 
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