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I'm about to install a bolt-on valve stem on my rear wheel. How tight do these have to be, when do I know when it is tight enough?
 

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I don't claim to be an expert on this, but I would say don't tighten so much that you could tear or distort the rubber seals. I doubt there is a torque figure, but if there is it would be low. When I have used this type on car wheels, I tighten till I feel the rubber bits start to twist rather than slip on the metal parts. I hope this helps. Check with soapy water just to be sure.
 

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as dynodon said don't over tighten,
I just snuged mine up real good, works great
 

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It's kinda subjective, but I watch for two things when installing these: 1) I watch the rubber gasket on the outside (or inside, if that's where it's at) of the rim to make sure that I don't squash it too much. I also tighten very slowly while using a finger to gently attempt to move the tip of the stem back and forth. I normally set my stem tip at about a 45 degree angle from the rim. When I cannot easily move the tip back and forth (in other words, can't easily rotate the stem in the hole in the rim), I quit. I tighten just enough to make sure the stem stays in the location I want it, and that's enough. So far, I've not had problems with leakage or damage doing it this way.
 

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I snug them down until they can't be moved in the hole, then I loc-tite the second nut.
 

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I snug them down until they can't be moved in the hole, then I loc-tite the second nut.
Excellent advice! I was gonna say tighten it down until it strips, then back off a quarter turn.

prs
 

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I do like John. Tighten them until they will not move and Thread Lock the nuts. That way vibration cannot work the nuts loose.

The rubber seals on the valve stems seems to not have much U.V. protection as you can see the rubber crack soon where it squishes out, but under the metal of the stem, it is still good even after 3 or 4 years.

Honda sure messed up with those plastic clips.....:tongue:

They finally got the message though, the new bikes are all metal.
 

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Rule of thumb: when compressing a rubber seal like the one under a valve stem, compress the seal until it's sides bulge to a gental curvature. If it is curvature begins to bulge up past the flatness of the surface compressing it (usually a washer) that is way to tight. Usually, a seal like that is way over tightend. As it ages, that will so with lots of cracking around the edges.

Here is another way to do it. Think of it like this. When airing the valve stem, it should never be able to rock allowing anything under the seal. Tighten the nut to that point only ... most likly a slight movement will still be there and that is normal.

Here is another way to look at it. If you over tighten it to the point of a double nut not needed, then you don't need to double nut it. So don't tighten it that tight. The double nut is there for a reason.

Also, just like all chemical, never use them unless they are called for. Just because you think they are needed is usually not a good reason. So unless lock tight is required by the manufacture, don't use it. If installed correctly, none is needed. Just make sure the lock nut is tight.
 

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Like Greg says, be careful not to over-tighten the nuts, the metal cup on the outside should not touch the rim. Too much torque and the outer washer will hit the rim and bend the stem. I use a torque screwdriver and apply 20 in/lbs. I also use a drop of red loctight on the second nut because it is tough to get a wrench to hold the first nut while tightening the pinch nut so I add a drop of red threadloc to be sure.
I've installed a few hundred of them over the last few years and not one complaint or leak.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Rule of thumb: when compressing a rubber seal like the one under a valve stem, compress the seal until it's sides bulge to a gental curvature. If it is curvature begins to bulge up past the flatness of the surface compressing it (usually a washer) that is way to tight. Usually, a seal like that is way over tightend. As it ages, that will so with lots of cracking around the edges.

Here is another way to do it. Think of it like this. When airing the valve stem, it should never be able to rock allowing anything under the seal. Tighten the nut to that point only ... most likly a slight movement will still be there and that is normal.

Here is another way to look at it. If you over tighten it to the point of a double nut not needed, then you don't need to double nut it. So don't tighten it that tight. The double nut is there for a reason.

Also, just like all chemical, never use them unless they are called for. Just because you think they are needed is usually not a good reason. So unless lock tight is required by the manufacture, don't use it. If installed correctly, none is needed. Just make sure the lock nut is tight.
This sounds good. I already have the tire mounted and the wheel installed and there is a good chance I tightened it a tad too much but I'll keep an eye on the cracking you referred to. I'll install the next one a little different. Thanks for the advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Like Greg says, be careful not to over-tighten the nuts, the metal cup on the outside should not touch the rim. Too much torque and the outer washer will hit the rim and bend the stem. I use a torque screwdriver and apply 20 in/lbs. I also use a drop of red loctight on the second nut because it is tough to get a wrench to hold the first nut while tightening the pinch nut so I add a drop of red threadloc to be sure.
I've installed a few hundred of them over the last few years and not one complaint or leak.
I don't think I tightened the nut to much to cause the washer to bent from hitting the wheel but this is what i'll look for when I do the front wheel.
Thanks, Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for the advice all. I'll have to remember this when I do my next tire change.
BTW. If I'm ever in your company and you hear me say I change my own rear GL1800 tires because I like to and it's fun....PLEASE,

feel free to slap me on the back of the head.
LOL
What a job.
 

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On the first nut I use 25 in lb of torque.

If you put a small wrench on a grinder and thin it down some, you can use it to hold the first nut when tightening the second with a socket.
I get the second tight as I can.

I also use locktite, either red or high temp.
 
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