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I decided to stroll into virgin territory and Ventured too deep. I added speed bleeders and proceeded to follow the sequence. All went well until I got to the anti-dive. Awhile back I did the Buckskin fork tube monotube swap. The AD is disabled when he rebuilds them, but I put the bag on and tried to bleed it. Not sure if that is the issue, but I've gone thru the rear master cylinder procedure twice and still have zero rear brake. I've tried putting weight on the rear brake and tie wrapping the front (twice), but no luck. After I had no brakes, while redoing the rear right I let the MC run dry (DUH!). Today I'm going to pick up a 10 mm line wrench and try the Rocky bleed. Is the block that he refers to, the one on the left side about 4" above the bottom of the tree? It looks like it has a solid brake line heading in and rubber coming out. If that fails, I saw in a post that Fred mentioned bleeding the rear MC. Any suggestions on how to do that? We finally got warm weather and I have no rear brakes. Any and all suggestions are greatly appreciated. TIA
 

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Perhaps you are sucking in air through the speedbleeder threads? Don't open the speedbleeders any more than absolutely necessary (maybe 1/8 turn). You may want to double check the seal on the threads.

With the introduction of air from the MC running low, it will take a bit to get it purged again. Start from the begining and bleed the first circuit until you see air bubbles, and then keep going until you don't see any air bubbles. Don't move to the next circuit until those two things (in that order) occur. Then move to the next circuit and work on it until all air bubbles are gone. Continue until the end.

I decided to stroll into virgin territory and Ventured too deep. I added speed bleeders and proceeded to follow the sequence. All went well until I got to the anti-dive. Awhile back I did the Buckskin fork tube monotube swap. The AD is disabled when he rebuilds them, but I put the bag on and tried to bleed it. Not sure if that is the issue, but I've gone thru the rear master cylinder procedure twice and still have zero rear brake. I've tried putting weight on the rear brake and tie wrapping the front (twice), but no luck. After I had no brakes, while redoing the rear right I let the MC run dry (DUH!). Today I'm going to pick up a 10 mm line wrench and try the Rocky bleed. Is the block that he refers to, the one on the left side about 4" above the bottom of the tree? It looks like it has a solid brake line heading in and rubber coming out. If that fails, I saw in a post that Fred mentioned bleeding the rear MC. Any suggestions on how to do that? We finally got warm weather and I have no rear brakes. Any and all suggestions are greatly appreciated. TIA
 

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Speed bleeders will not now work, a dry master has no fluid to push. They work fine until something like the master goes dry, then as there is no fluid to push, uh oh..........

You will have to now pull new fluid through and into the system with a vacuum system.

Do not break the front banjo bolt, (rocky bleed) as this will just compound the air problem. Do that under line pressure only when the system is functional.
 

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Perhaps you are sucking in air through the speedbleeder threads? Don't open the speedbleeders any more than absolutely necessary (maybe 1/8 turn). You may want to double check the seal on the threads.

With the introduction of air from the MC running low, it will take a bit to get it purged again. Start from the begining and bleed the first circuit until you see air bubbles, and then keep going until you don't see any air bubbles. Don't move to the next circuit until those two things (in that order) occur. Then move to the next circuit and work on it until all air bubbles are gone. Continue until the end.
:agree: As you are bleeding each bleed screw you should see the fluid level slowly dropping in the reservoir. Make sure the reservoir always has some fluid in it. If you pump it dry, you will have to start from the beginning again. You shouldn't have to open any brake line fittings.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the pointers! I'll start at step one and try again. Kit....if all else fails, I might need some more direction. I just bought a Mighty Vac and a Uview, so if one of them is the answer, I'm equipped

The front brake is perfect. Do I have to do the first two steps that use the front MC? Or, hopefully, can I start with the pedal ones? TIA
 

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The front and rear are independent systems so you can do them separately. If the front is good, you don't need to mess with it.

Make sure you have plenty of fluid on hand. You'll want at least 16oz on hand just in case. I run through 32oz of fluid bleeding out two bikes and most of it is used on the Wing. The Wing has LOTS of plumbing for the brake lines and uses lots of fluid. :evil:

Thanks for the pointers! I'll start at step one and try again. Kit....if all else fails, I might need some more direction. I just bought a Mighty Vac and a Uview, so if one of them is the answer, I'm equipped

The front brake is perfect. Do I have to do the first two steps that use the front MC? Or, hopefully, can I start with the pedal ones? TIA
 

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To prevent air being sucked back in around the bleeders you can wrap Teflon tape around the threads or use thick grease around the base of them. If you don't want to start over I would and have used grease.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the pointers! I redid everything served by the pedal, except for the anti-dive. It's about 90% one the first pump and jumps up to good as new on the second. I'll tinker some more on another day...as soon as my patience returns. Thanks for all the suggestions! there was some dampness near a couple of speed bleeders, and both on the rear caliper drank some serious fluid. Thanks again!

Do you guys bleed disabled AD's, or is it unnecessary?
 

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Thanks for all the pointers! I redid everything served by the pedal, except for the anti-dive. It's about 90% one the first pump and jumps up to good as new on the second. I'll tinker some more on another day...as soon as my patience returns. Thanks for all the suggestions! there was some dampness near a couple of speed bleeders, and both on the rear caliper drank some serious fluid. Thanks again!

Do you guys bleed disabled AD's, or is it unnecessary?
I always bleed that also. Helps keep the secondary master clean.
 

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Yup I always bleed the ADV circuit. Even though its functionality is disabled on my bike it is still connected to the brake system.

To firm that pedal, you need to bleed the system more. I can take an enormous amount of fluid to push through the system before you get rid of the air especially if you introduced a bunch of air into the system previously.

Thanks for all the pointers! I redid everything served by the pedal, except for the anti-dive. It's about 90% one the first pump and jumps up to good as new on the second. I'll tinker some more on another day...as soon as my patience returns. Thanks for all the suggestions! there was some dampness near a couple of speed bleeders, and both on the rear caliper drank some serious fluid. Thanks again!

Do you guys bleed disabled AD's, or is it unnecessary?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the great advice! I'll enjoy a few good days on it, then re-bleed. I'll pick up a few more bottles of fluid and another Advil....good to go!

Thanks again!
 
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