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Discussion Starter #1
Wondering why this is required, never heard of anyone doing it with there there cars. had a few cars i put over 100,000 never changed brake fluid, why are motorcycles different? I know its no big deal and cost vary little but just cant help but wonder if its really nessary;)
 

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I do it once a year in all my vehicles, 4 wheels and 2. DOT 3 or 4 brake fluid is hygroscopic, which means it absorbs moisture from the air. Some think that the brake systems are sealed, but moisture finds its way into the brake fluid, more so on our motorcycle's brake master cylinder since they are exposed to the elements.

At the friction point the temperatures can rise to well above 212*, which is the boiling point of water. With enough moisture in your brake fluid, once this temperature is reached, moisture will turn to a gas state....vapor.

You'll be hard pressed, pun intended, to stop any vehicle with enough vapor in the brake lines.

Another important factor to consider is the corrosion that moisture creates when in contact with aluminum parts found on modern brake system.

Changing brake fluid is an easy and vital maintenance for an optimum and efficient brake application.

Mike
 

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Almost all cars today require brake and clutch fluid change. It is usually part of a major service (30k). Goldwing especially need it because of their anti-dive valve (ADV). If the fluid is changed as recommended, the ADV will last into high milage. If the fluid is not changed, the ADV usually goes bad between 35-60k.
 

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OK coupla questions

At the friction point the temperatures can rise to well above 212*, which is the boiling point of water. With enough moisture in your brake fluid, once this temperature is reached, moisture will turn to a gas state....vapor.
Yes there is friction between the brake pads and rotors....but the brake FLUID is not making contact with the rotors and pads....how does the brake fluid in the lines get so hot??
 

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Goldwing especially need it because of their anti-dive valve (ADV). If the fluid is changed as recommended, the ADV will last into high milage. If the fluid is not changed, the ADV usually goes bad between 35-60k.
Although I agree that the brake fluid changes are a "good thing" and I change mine annually, I am unaware of any coorelation between brake fluid age/condition and the swelling of the "O" rings in the AD valve, which in turn leads to the sticking valves.

prs
 

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OK coupla questions



Yes there is friction between the brake pads and rotors....but the brake FLUID is not making contact with the rotors and pads....how does the brake fluid in the lines get so hot??
The caliper pistons are in direct contact with the plates of the brake pads, the fluid is in direct contact with the inner surface of the pistions. The water would tend to condense and migrate toward the lower extremities of the system and thus brake fade raises its ugly head. Moisture contamination is one reason to change the brake hydraulic fluid, the other is to prevent clogging of the master cylinder which can be a royal PIA to repair. I recall my OE fluid had some gelling or gummy deposits in the master cylinder reservoir at only 12,000 miles. I think I recall others reporting that too, maybe Fred H. I have noticed no further such clots since changing to Valvoline SynPower 3-4. The only trouble I have had with that brand of fluid is that it does not discolor much in only one year of use and its more difficult to tell when the new fluid had pushed out all of the older fluid.

prs
 

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OK coupla questions



Yes there is friction between the brake pads and rotors....but the brake FLUID is not making contact with the rotors and pads....how does the brake fluid in the lines get so hot??
The brake fluid is pushing on the brake pads and the heat that builds up on the brake pads is transfered to the brake fluid.

I change my brake and clutch fluid every year. Honda says to do it every two years, but I just feel better doing it every spring....it's a easy job.

I know alot of people don't change the brake fluid....mainly because it's easy to forget about the brake fluid....but the brake fluid will turn into a white gunky fluid in the lower brake lines over time because of the moisture it absorbs and over time the brake components will be damaged from corrosion requiring costly repairs.....it's always better and much cheaper to do preventive maintenance instead of costly repairs.
 

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NJREF-Yes there is friction between the brake pads and rotors....but the brake FLUID is not making contact with the rotors and pads....how does the brake fluid in the lines get so hot??

From the pistons that push the pads to make contact with the rotors. Brake fluid pushes the piston and that is where the transfer of heat occurs.
 

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You will find many here who never change their brake fluid, but then again these are the same who use automotive synthetic oil and change their oil every 18,000 miles. And yes their vehicle runs. The also check their valves every 95,000 miles.. and say it runs OK. They are fooling themselves.

I change my brake fluid and shoes once a year.
 

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If you only change your shoes once a year, laen, I bet your feet sure smell.
 
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Discussion Starter #12
brake-clutch fluid change

Thanks everyone for the great feedback. Wow some of you guys really know what your talking about. It will be done.;)
 

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Here's why I believe a motorcycle should undergo more intensive maintenance than does a car:

While I take ALL maintenance seriously, I take car maintenance MORE seriously than I do lawnmower maintenance, and I take motorcycle maintenance MORE seriously than I do car maintenance. Likewise, I considered the maintenance of any aircraft I flew MORE serious than I did motorcycle maintenance.

And, I damned sure took manned spacecraft maintenance MORE seriously than any other type of maintenance, at least when it came to my pink little body.

It's all a matter of safety margin. Cars have lots more margin than do bikes. That's indisputable. What is acceptable to neglect on a car ain't so on a bike, it's as simple as that!
 

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:flg:.

Yes, Laen is correct again, There are those on here who never change the fluids.

Present bike, 2001 GL-1800, 222,000 miles, original brake and clutch fluids. Change oil every 15,000 miles. Have not checked valves yet.

Previous bike, 1988 GL-1500, 296,000 miles, sold with original brake and clutch fluids, changed oil every 15,000 miles, Replaced cam belts once !!

Previous, 1975 GL1000, 1980 Gl1100, 1985 GL1200ltd.. All with over 200k on them accept the 1985 and it had just under 200k... They all were running just fine when I sold them. The 1975 required a lot of valve adjustments and all the belt driven ones required new belts.

So as laen says " I am just fooling myself"

Sorry for being such a fool guys !!

PS, my old van, 1993 Mercury Villager, 280,000 miles, Never changed fluids in it either and do extended oil changes. Of course it is rusting out in places LOL.



JMHO :rolleyes:

:flg:





 

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are you sure

Just tell me how you are "changing" the fluid in your brakes?
Maybe I am totaly off base here as I have yet to fully drain a brake system on a gold wing, but have had auto's over 300k and have only had to do 1 fully drain brake job on a car that had a master clynder issue. Go ahead and pipe in here... but here it goes..

Are you sure you are fully emptying the master and slave reserviors when you change the fluid? How do you know it is truly empty?

If you think about it the bleeder plug is usually on top of the caliper so the air can exscape not on the bottom. And if moisture settles to the bottom then to truly empty the brake caliper you must remove it and turn it upside down to drain it or flush it out with more fluid while upside down.

When you squeeze the brake handle till no more fluid escapes the bleeder valve, just means that the pump in the handle has cavitated but it doesn't fully empty the line or the caliper piston reservior area. Plus if the piston is anything less than fully seated there can remain a consiberable amount of fluid in there.

So to fully change the fluid and empty all the trapped moisture you should a. open the lines and blow nitrogen through them b. remove the calipers and drain them. Just pumping new fluid through the lines only removed trapped air and moisture that has vaporized but doesn't remove the moisture that is still in a liquid state that is sitting in the bottom of the piston reservior in the caliper.

I just crack the bleeder and bleed mine each brake pad job while the piston is fully seated, then top off the reservior with new fluid. Pumping them down all the way is only if I have to do maintenance on the caliper itself and have to crack a line loose which requires me to drain the line. Todays fluids are manufactured to prevent corrosion, resist moisture, and resist heat generated by the pads to piston transfer of heat. Constantly opening the reservior to the atmosphere can induce more moisture into a already closed system.

So are you sure you are really changing the fluid?:shrug:
 

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I've brought up this topic before. I look the bike over before each ride and check the tire pressure weekly. I change the oil every 5K using Rotella and do the final drive every other oil change. I've replaced the clutch and brake fluid at 10K and probably won't do it again until it starts to look dark. I try and stay mindful of whether what I'm doing is "recreational" maintenance or is it needed maintenance.
 

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There are two ways of looking at this. First, did you read the manual where is says every two years? Then, you get to decide what side the fence you want to be on. Some never change fluids, some change every year, and either way suits the rider that bought the bike.

Same way as some never check their tire pressure, others check before every ride. Some never wash their bike, others wash it after every ride. Some never check their spark plugs, some change every year. Pick your road - Its you that has to ride it.
 

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Also,if you get moisture in the system,it can corrode the piston and cause it to freeze up.
I have an 85 RV that I bought nine years ago with 47,000 original miles.
I have only put about 10,000 miles on it in nine years.

Last year I thought the brakes felt a little mushy,and when I checked the brake fluid it was almost black with "gunk" in the master cylinder.
I had my local shop change out the brakes and brake fluid,and he ended up replacing one wheel cylinder because it was froze up.

Last time I used the RV,I had to make a panic stop,and actually locked up the wheels. I was really glad I had the fluid changed!!
 

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I will add it is an aspect of maintenance that is often overlooked, but should be done. For a car, any brake change, rotors turned, etc should include a brake fluid flush and refill. With the right tools, it's a simple thing to do, esp. for a professional shop.

I, for the first time in my life, did a brake system and clutch fluid change today. My CBR has never been done since being bought in 2004. Has 10,000 miles on it, the brake fluid was brown, the clutch fluid black! The clutch reservoir had solid debris at the bottom.. I cleaned that all out.

I use to wonder the same thing... but after seeing the junk in the clutch reservoir, I won't be letting this much time pass before a fluid change again...
 
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