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Discussion Starter #1
I just did my first brake install of new OEM front brake pads following Fred's videos. Everything went according to the book until I had pretty much finished the job. When I pumped up the brakes the left side pads seem to be dragging slightly. Is this normal, I wouldn't think so. This is a 2003 ABS bike.

Any ideas?
 

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Grumpy Fart
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How do you know it's the left side dragging?

If someone installed new pads,
And pumped the brakes.
And someone topped off the fluid,
And the bike was driven,
And the pads wore a bit,
And someone topped the fluid off again,
And you didn't remove any fluid when you compressed the pistons,
Then your pads may be dragging.
And if you open your reservoir,
Then you will spill brake juice all over your top shelter,
And you will be really pissed.
 

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Vendor
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Disc brakes normally drag so it is probably normal. Make sure you rotors are clean after installing new pads. Spray a rag with Brake Clean (Walmart) and with the tire off the ground, spin the rotor while cleaning both sides with the soaked rag. Make sure the rotor sound is not from it rubbing against the caliper.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Actually, I just pulled the left side caliper and the right does drag but only very slightly. The left side drags more and would prevent the tire from making a complete revolution. So, I would have to say that they are both dragging.

I also thought of the scenario you described so I carefully removed the reservoir cover and it was not overflowing. A little high maybe so I removed some but that was it.


Should I remove the calipers and pads and then compress the pucks and try again?
 

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If the wheel won't make a full revolution,the brakes are too tight. It should make at least 3 revs when spun.

A good place to start is to make sure the tabs on the pad tops are seated fully into the caliper. Fred shows sliding the caliper to do this.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just did the entire process again with the same results. No drag at all when I install the pads and the calibers (before pumping brakes). Slight drag of the pads on the rotors on both sides after pumping brakes. Now I will say that the pads I took off were well worn and almost to the wear slot on the left side and not so close on the right side. I guess the question is, are these new pads supposed to touch the rotor when not engaged? Are they supposed to be set in after driving some miles (wear). Sorry if this seems stupid but it's my first brake change and I'm not quite sure what is acceptable and what is not.
 

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Just did the entire process again with the same results. No drag at all when I install the pads and the calibers (before pumping brakes). Slight drag of the pads on the rotors on both sides after pumping brakes. Now I will say that the pads I took off were well worn and almost to the wear slot on the left side and not so close on the right side. I guess the question is, are these new pads supposed to touch the rotor when not engaged? Are they supposed to be set in after driving some miles (wear). Sorry if this seems stupid but it's my first brake change and I'm not quite sure what is acceptable and what is not.
I think you are ok. Go ride the bike about five miles bring it in and see what it does.

There is no return on the brake pistons. They rub a bit all the time, the only thing that kicks them back a bit would be the slight difference in the rotor as it rotates.

When new they do tend to drag a bit more than when worn into the rotor.

Make sure the calipers can freely slide also. Sometimes that will create unwanted drag.
 

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There is no return on the brake pistons. They rub a bit all the time, the only thing that kicks them back a bit would be the slight difference in the rotor as it rotates.
The rotor is not responsible for the return or the pads. The flexing of the internal squared o-ring retracts the piston. The square o-ring serves 4 purposes. Retracks the piston, seals fluid pressure, allow for piston asjustment, and keeps air out. Sorry, I missed that question on a ASE brake test once and have never forgot the answer. Since we are on that topic. The outer seal is responsible for keeping road dirt and dust out even when the piston is pushed back in for new pads. Many on here will Brake Clean the pistons before pushing them back in. I think they watch a video or something that tells them to do that. That is an incorrect procedure. To test the outer piston dust seal, push the piston back in, then apply brake pressure to push piston out a little to verify the outer seal just clean the puck as it went back in. If not, it is time for a caliper OH since the outer seal is not doing it job. One not doing its job means dirt will get past the outer and damage the inner seal.
 

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The rotor is not responsible for the return or the pads. The flexing of the internal squared o-ring retracts the piston. The square o-ring serves 4 purposes.
I wondered why that thing was flat, that explains it, did not know the reason, just knew it was.

I never just replace the pads anyways, I always rebuilt the entire caliper, polish all the slider bolts and pistons, and stone the rotors.

Just me, do it right if you are going to do it.

So if after a short ride the brakes are not releasing, then he should rebuild the calipers.

Darn, learned a new thing.....Thanks. :lol:
 

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No sir:

I have a new job, start that on June 29, 2011. Timing is not right. :frown::frown:

But I will catch up with you, Wheels I wanted to meet, a few others.

Life ya know.........work before play. Nose to the grinder and all that. :lol:

Making a run to Carrabella, Florida the next couple days, leaving tomorrow, so will enjoy that and be happy.
 

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So if after a short ride the brakes are not releasing, then he should rebuild the calipers.
Well, maybe ... before replacing the pads a proper brake inspection should be done. The caliper has to slide freely. Fluid can't be trapped from a colapsed brake hose and things like that has to be verified first. Possible rotor runout, pads not mounted correctly. The pad mount pin can be groved. Those are some that can cause that too that come to mind. Actually, it starts with a test ride before replacement of the pads first.
 

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Hard to do when the parts person at the dealership orders all the seals in the same size. There's like three different sizes of pistons in the calibers. The linked braking system is nothing less than a totally over engineered piece a crap.
Oh well, I learned about the average dealer long ago. I pull up the parts breakdown and order my own parts.

Last time I went to a dealer I wanted a little bracket for the left pin connector (for the large gray one under the pocket box) nope cannot get it, have to order the entire wire harness to get it.

Got it from bike bandit. Going to a dealer, one has to have a sense of humor, and lots of patience. And not be in any hurry.
 

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Still The linked braking system is nothing less than a totally over engineered piece a crap.
I like my linked braking system. I have ABS and keep my suspension stock with a working ADV. I respect Honda's design. They control the forward weight shift of a really large, heavy bike that maybe carry a single rider of 180 lbs to a Wing that could be carrying 2 heavy ones fully loaded while pulling a trailer. Basically, our Wings have to be as versable as F150 pickup.
 
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