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Discussion Starter #1
Need some "expert" opinions and advice, here, guys:

Just took Cloud 9 in for new brakes at my local independent shop after our 3,356 mile jaunt through the CO and UT mountains. The pedal travel was a little long, and I thought it was "time". I had asked that both fronts and the rear pads be changed out. The shop owner called a couple of hours later with his report and a few questions.

* Left front pads were all but gone.
* Right front and rear pads looked hardly touched

Bike has ~26K miles on the OEM pads, and I was feeling quite a bit of pedal travel and less so on the lever (obviously). Visual inspection showed the LF pads to be almost shot, but the RF had plenty of meat on them. Rears were a little better than just OK, but plenty of meat as well. I asked that he skip changing out the rears and go ahead and change both set of fronts, which he did (EBC-HH), along with a DOT4 Brake Fluid transfusion. We'll change out the rears with the next rear tire change.

My Questions:
1) How long should OEM pads last (discounting diverse riding styles, of course)? Best guess?
2) Could something be amiss with the proportioning valve on the front/rear of the linked brakes? Heavy wear on left front, not so much on the rear?
3) Would towing a trailer 2-up account for the heavier wear on the LF?

Inquiring minds want to know.........thanks for the input!
 

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Need some "expert" opinions and advice, here, guys:

Just took Cloud 9 in for new brakes at my local independent shop after our 3,356 mile jaunt through the CO and UT mountains. The pedal travel was a little long, and I thought it was "time". I had asked that both fronts and the rear pads be changed out. The shop owner called a couple of hours later with his report and a few questions.

* Left front pads were all but gone.
* Right front and rear pads looked hardly touched

Bike has ~26K miles on the OEM pads, and I was feeling quite a bit of pedal travel and less so on the lever (obviously). Visual inspection showed the LF pads to be almost shot, but the RF had plenty of meat on them. Rears were a little better than just OK, but plenty of meat as well. I asked that he skip changing out the rears and go ahead and change both set of fronts, which he did (EBC-HH), along with a DOT4 Brake Fluid transfusion. We'll change out the rears with the next rear tire change.

My Questions:
1) How long should OEM pads last (discounting diverse riding styles, of course)? Best guess?
2) Could something be amiss with the proportioning valve on the front/rear of the linked brakes? Heavy wear on left front, not so much on the rear?
3) Would towing a trailer 2-up account for the heavier wear on the LF?

Inquiring minds want to know.........thanks for the input!
I changed left front a couple of weeks ago at 42,000 miles. All others were good. I pull a pop-up camper trailer about 60% of the miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
OK

Hmmmmm....OK, batess6. So my expectation should have been to get much more than ~26K out of the LF. Good to know.

It tells me that for some reason, I'm getting poor "mileage" out of the LF for whatever reason. Need to dig deeper here.
 

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Left fronts always go first. 25K is not bad especially if you ride lots of hills and dales. I have 55K and still have a set of rears hanging in the garage waiting for the first ever swap back there.

If she feels good, then you are ok with the wear pattern.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah

Hey Waldo. I guess I don't feel so bad now. I asked that both fronts get changed, even though the RF and the rears didn't seem to need it.

Is it "normal" to change out just the LF at twice the frequency of the RF? I'll take a guess here and say that I should be consistent with brake manufacturers on the fronts.

Thanks!
 

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Yes, LF frequency is highest due to rear pedal linkage.

I would not expect pedal travel to be related wear on brakes, rather the condition of your brake fluid. Did you/are you having the brake fluid replaced?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yup

Sure thing mejojo. I try to change it out every couple of years or so.
 

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Left front, while sitting on the bike, is the thinnest set of pads. I've been told this several times and when I asked why, no body really seems to know.
Just had mine changed today, the others look like they will go until the left front need changing again.
Oh yea, got that new tire smell rubbed on too. I just love new sneakers.
:excited:
Best wishes.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yeah

Exactly what I experienced, TX. Just a new concept for me, I guess. I was always used to changing out ALL the pads on the front at the same time.

Thanks to all for your input. Mystery solved!
 

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I always replace the pads as a complete set. On the front i am getting 50K consitantly but get this i just replaced the rear pads for the first time at 100K and still they had a bit meat in them awsome i reckon :cool::cool::thumbup:

CHEERS :thumbup:
 

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Left front, while sitting on the bike, is the thinnest set of pads. I've been told this several times and when I asked why, no body really seems to know.
Just had mine changed today, the others look like they will go until the left front need changing again.
Oh yea, got that new tire smell rubbed on too. I just love new sneakers.
:excited:
Best wishes.
When new both fronts sets start with the same thickness and have the same replacement wear marks. In other words they both have equal usable pad. I get 22-25k out of my LF and maybe 30ish on the RF and 35-40 on my rear as I recall. Everything I talk about here is for OEM pads, the only ones I stock, recommend, and use. Also, there is no need to replace all sets if others have plenty of pad left.

Most likely, the OP's low pedle issue will be resolved with new pads. Don't forget to have the brake and clutch fluid changed and a new air filter. This should be the second time around on all of those and hopefully the antifreeze was changed at 24k. All of that is required maintance per Honda.
 

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very normal for left front pads to wearout first

rear will be next

right front pads will last at least twice as long
 

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Discussion Starter #14
3 fronts

Well, I'm working on my third front now, so I guess I'm a little too heavy on the brakes compared to your riding style. No worries, everyone is different.

When on the longer trips, and riding two up, we're usually also towing our fully loaded trailer. I always try to rely more on the "rear" (linked) brakes, instead of just the fronts. That factor may be contributing to my unusual wear patterns as well.

In any event, I'm happy with the results. Changed out both set of fronts for consistency, changed out the brake fluid and visually inspected all other systems. Swapped out the coolant about 6K miles ago, but have yet to tackle the air filter. Not looking forward to that one.

Thanks all for the input. I learned something today!
 

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Cloud9: :nojoke:
Be sure to keep the RF pads in your "junk box." There may be $40.00 worth of wear left in them. They will fit the LF as well, or the RF or LF of your buddy's bike. They will even fit mine!!! Just move the thin attached plate (whatever it is called) to the other pad. :thumbup:

(To the best of my experience and knowledge, the information here is correct. However, that does not mean it is true.):doorag:

If you did not keep the pads, you can be certain that the mechanic did.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Good One

Great advice, Cliff. I'll be sure to secure my RF pads and keep them around. Never can tell when they might come in handy.
 

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When on the longer trips, and riding two up, we're usually also towing our fully loaded trailer. I always try to rely more on the "rear" (linked) brakes, instead of just the fronts. That factor may be contributing to my unusual wear patterns as well.
That is part of your problem. Even with a trailer you should be using the front and rear brakes together, both for safety and wear.

But the front left will still wear faster than the right.
 

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My left fronts were worn too far for comfort at 16,500 miles. Right front and rear probably OK for another 10K.

Most of my riding is in congested areas.
 

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.

I always try to rely more on the "rear" (linked) brakes, instead of just the fronts.
Just an FYI ... applying your front only also applies the rear when the LF caliper is lifted. Here is how the Service Manual states it.



• This motorcycle is equipped with the following systems:
– LBS (Linked Brake System) – that is designed to engage both front and rear brakes when either the brake lever or​
brake pedal is used.
 
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