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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think I've scored my rear brake rotor. Feels slightly grooved. Need to get flashlight/mirror and check pad wear grove closer. But I think it's gone. (36K miles)

Can/Do dealers turn Wing break rotors??
 

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I know they can be ground down. But I've never heard of a place that would/can turn them on a brake lathe. I worked with brake lathes for about 9 years. Never heard of anyone doing it. But that doesn't mean things haven't changed in the last 20 years.
 

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$231.00 for a rotor!
Might look into buying a rear wheel from a trike shop. Maybe cheaper.
 
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Mike that is a pretty rare event , even with slight grooving , it should be fine . You could measure the total thickness left across the grooved face and see if you are within specs if you are concerned . I've run some pretty sad rotors on bikes and cars . When they get too thin they can overheat and warp. Or if the surface is really rough it can cause your pads to wear prematurely .
BTW , are you running aftermarket pads ?
 

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Brake rotor

If you know someone who has access to a machine shop with a surface grinder you could go that route.The service manual will tell you what the serviceable limit is.If you have to pay for labor it would be cheaper to buy new.Are you sure that the rotor is unserviceable? Some scoring is normal.A rotory hone will do wonders if you are getting a squeal.It couldn't hurt to try one.You can do the rear rotor by removing rear wheel and brake pads.Put in first gear,idle engine and use hone in drill.....Be careful.......I have done this when I developed a squeal in rear rotor....Jim
 

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Mike, get on E-Bay and get a new one (well may be slightly used) from one of the trike builders. I have seen them go for under $50. Trikers sell all kinds of rear-end parts from Wings, pads, calipers, wheels.....Dont know of anyone that ever turned a bike rotor.
 

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If the groove is uniform around the rotor, the pad will wear into it and it shouldn't affect the pad or braking ability much at all. If the groove is a spiral, it'll keep eating the pad and should be fixed. You be the judge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Strider said:
Mike that is a pretty rare event , even with slight grooving , it should be fine . You could measure the total thickness left across the grooved face and see if you are within specs if you are concerned . I've run some pretty sad rotors on bikes and cars . When they get too thin they can overheat and warp. Or if the surface is really rough it can cause your pads to wear prematurely .
BTW , are you running aftermarket pads ?
OEM pads.

As several suggested.... I'm just gonna leave the rotor. But keep my eye out for a deal on a new one (trike builder, etc..). Figure maybe the pads might wear faster. Don't think it's too rough. Felt like small even grooves around the circumference of the rotor.
 

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Wanderer said, "If the groove is a spiral, it'll keep eating the pad."

If it were raised it might work that way but a spiral groove shouldn't cause any extra wear at all. It wouldn't be any different than all the slots they put in discs to help cool and shed water.

If it is a concentric groove you are correct that the pad will eventually conform to it and it will have little, if any, effect at all.
 

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[quote="TxGoldWingOEM pads.

As several suggested.... I'm just gonna leave the rotor. But keep my eye out for a deal on a new one (trike builder, etc..). Figure maybe the pads might wear faster. Don't think it's too rough. Felt like small even grooves around the circumference of the rotor.[/quote]
36k and the REAR pads scored the rotor??? :shock: The OEM rears are twice the thickness of the fronts!! If the scores are uniform and not sharp (like from a metal to metal rubbing) don't sweat it, that's perfectly normal..
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
PunkinWing said:
[quote="TxGoldWingOEM pads.

As several suggested.... I'm just gonna leave the rotor. But keep my eye out for a deal on a new one (trike builder, etc..). Figure maybe the pads might wear faster. Don't think it's too rough. Felt like small even grooves around the circumference of the rotor.
36k and the REAR pads scored the rotor??? :shock: The OEM rears are twice the thickness of the fronts!! If the scores are uniform and not sharp (like from a metal to metal rubbing) don't sweat it, that's perfectly normal..[/quote]

very surprised at the wear @ 36K also. My type of usual riding is country riding...little traffic or stops. I don't brake much since I know the roads well. And 500+ mile trips to Texas Hill Country, etc....
 

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Mad Meteor said:
Wanderer said, "If the groove is a spiral, it'll keep eating the pad."

If it were raised it might work that way but a spiral groove shouldn't cause any extra wear at all. It wouldn't be any different than all the slots they put in discs to help cool and shed water.

If it is a concentric groove you are correct that the pad will eventually conform to it and it will have little, if any, effect at all.
If the pad will wear in to a concentric groove, it will also wear in to a spiral groove. Since a spiral is not concentric, as the pad wears in to the groove, the groove will keep eating it off. Slots and holes in disks to keep them cool aren't anything like grooves. The pad is being forced against the flat surface of the disk and the slots/holes have almost no affect on the pad.
 

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I have slight groves in my rotor and just changed the rear brake pads with over 50,000 miles on the bike. The pads were not worn all the way down.
 

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Wanderer - I am going to politely disagree. It isn't worth getting into. Even if one of us could convince the other it wouldn't make any difference to the world at all.

Ride safe.
 

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Drilled rotors have to be blanchard ground on a special machine. It can be done, but is a bit costly. If your rotors need to be ground, you might want to consider just replacing them.

I bet you can buy a complete rear drive unit with a new rotor, swingarm and driveshaft from a trike maker cheaper than what a new rear rotor from the Honda dealer costs.

In my new 2 disc video update I show how to remove the glaze from rotors using a drill and a BRM rotor brush/hone that costs about $30. It won't remove deep gouges, but it will put a new fresh surface on the rotors and you can do it yourself at home. I do this anytime I put on new pads.

 

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I do what Fred does. But make sure you clean those rotors VERY well before putting them back on the bike. Use a very good quality brake cleaner and get the fine and I mean very fine particles out of the rotor surface. If you dont your rotors will get a glaze on them pretty quick. I know on my ASE test it says to only use garnett paper on them.
 

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papa benny said:
Why not remove the glaze with a bit of wet sandpaper and a wood block???
Well, the idea of the hone is that it puts a non directional pattern on the rotors when you are done. It also is a lot faster and easier to do it this way and the end result is much more uniform.
 

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A grooved rotor is ok as long as the groove is no more than 60 thousands of an inch deep.
 
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Yes they can be turned just like any other rotor. I did mine on a custom jig I setup for my lathe. I use a roller bearing to prevent the disk from deflection and simply surface one side and flip the disk and do the other. I had some serious pulsing happening on the front brake lever and it cured it for me.
 
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