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I agree with Richard as to the cause being underinflation or flat.

I advise that you pay close attention to Red's advice to check the Schrader valve stems. Without the plastic retainer they fail quickly when bike is moving. Even with retainer in place the rubber deteriorates over a few years. Bolt in type are more reliable.

Brakes dragging hard enough and long enough to heat up the tire and rim; I am not buying into that because by that time the rotor and pads would be totally burned-up.

prs
 

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Thanks for all the replies. A few points of clarification:

1. The tire is still in one piece but has a hole in one of the tread grooves. Not easily seen but big enough that I can hear and feel the air coming out of it as I try to fill it up so the tire does not inflate. When riding I felt a major wobble, pulled over, and saw that the tire was flat. This all happened within about 20-30 seconds.
2. The tire was a new Michelin Commander II installed a few months ago.
3. I did smell something like burnt rubber after pulling over.
4. Tire/Rim/Rotor were all very hot but the rotor was not glowing or blue.

I need to run the VIN by Honda and see if the brake recall was done. The VIN number is outside of the frame recall numbers so I think I'm good on that but do need to check if all of the other recalls were done. Since the bike was parked right after it was purchased I doubt any recalls were done.

I'm going to pull the rear caliper and check all of the rubber components in it. Lube it up (if not fully rebuild it).
I didn't know that Michelin made a Commander II in 180/60R16. That is the tire size recommended needed for the 2001 - 17 Wing.
 

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Ok. Its a small hole.
Possibly from riding over something?
I would use my puncture repair stop and go to repair the tyre.

I would also remove the brake calipers and pull them apart and give them a good clean up and service and re_assemble and remount.
Why spend the time on the caliper?
Good opportunity to flush out the brake lines as well.
I would want to know its A_OK and it will work as required.
 

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I had a puncture on my rear tire once and it deflated fairly quickly. I also smelled hot rubber when I got to a stop but didn't check to see if the rim was hot. I was able to fix it with a plug and was on my way. I rode that tire until it wore out several thousand miles later.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Did you replace the valve stem as Murf asked? Valve stems Honda uses should be another recall item. Get some solid steel stems, don't use the Honda part.
Also entirely possible you just got a defective tire. Brake problems seem like a longshot at best. As to the recall, do you trust a dealer to dismantle your entire brake system, properly bleed and reassemble correctly? I don't.
Yes, new valve stem installed.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Agree with l the focus on low tire pressure being the probable root cause. Here's a related question. What size and spec was the tire; e.g load rating, capacity, age (can look at the coding stamped on the sidewall to read the date manufactured), widthe and profile. GL1800's are very large and heavy and require the proper tire at the proper PSI. Also, what was the rider and passenger load and speed?
Tire was a Michelin Commander II. Rider and passenger about 350lb combined. Speed was around 65mph for about an hour before the flat.
 

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The tire in question actually has a higher load index than the the stock GW size. The stock 180/60R-16 has a load index of 74 (827 lbs) and the 180/65 B-16 Commander II has a load index 81 for 1019 lbs. Still points to perhaps a slow leak that allowed you to run 65 long enough to overheat and blow the tire.

I have had a number of flats while running at speed and it's a scary thing to get the bike slowed down and off the road before total loss of control. I'm glad nothing worse happened to you. After the last flat like that I installed an aftermarket TPMS that forces me to monitor tire pressures over time and more importantly gives warnings when a tire is slowly going down on a long ride. Nothing will warn of a FOD cut or hole that happens instantly but TPMS is something I would not want to be without ever again.
 

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Warning! If you have a flat from a small hole and find the tire/wheel really hot when you stop and inspect, you can risk an emergency repair and limp slowly back to civilization, but do not use it long term or at rated speeds. When you demount the tire you will discover the inner rubber lining has suffered and little BB sized rubber balls of slouthed off rubber are inside the tire. You will not fix a tire that has actually blown out, the tire will be split wide open.

prs
 
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