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I can't find instructions here for instructions on break pad replacement. Anyone have a site to use for this? I tried to search this with no results
1der
 

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Search brake pad ... in the archives ... not break pad ... simple ... but pay attention to details ...
 

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Grumpy Fart
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http://www.angelridevideos.com/ You should as many has + me, Buy These!
And a shop manual.

However the manual does not tell you to remove fluid from the reservoir if you have "topped" off your fluid. There is enough fluid in the reservoir to extend the pads when they are worn out. That is why if you see the white float in the sight glass of the reservoir, you pads are shot.

If your pads are worn and you top off the reservoir, you will have too much fluid in the system when you compress the calipers.

It's typical for the front left inside to wear the most. Metal to metal can be achieved without seeing the float in the sight glass.

The front fender has to be pulled to get a clear view of the front pads. It is much easier to drop the pads and inspect them than to pull the fender.
 

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Given the warnings about possible over full master cylinders above; otherwise this jop is EZ, but take care -- its your brakes for Heaven's sake!

All three calipers have similar pads, the rear OE pads are thicker. Grasp the caliper assembly with your hands and push in toward the bike firmly, then pull it outward firmly. Repeat several times to push the caliper pistons inward to make room for the pads to be loose. Do not activate the hand or foot brake after removing pads, unless you just like pushing pistons in with a tool. Each caliper has a small black neoprene plug toward the bottom. Remove that plug to expose a hex socket screw. Remove the screw. There is a pin behind that screw that you can see between the bottom of the "sandwitch" formed by the two pads and rotor. You can use needle nosed pliers to grasp the part of the pin you can see and tease the pin outward to where the hex screw was. Hold one hand under the pads as they will likely fall out as the pin is removed.

The pads will fall straight down once the pin has released them. There is a slight initial downward spring tension from a flat spring in the top of the caliper. Make a mental note of how the pads are oriented as they drop down. One will have a backing shim that rides upon the brake pistons, the other will not. It is a good idea to clean the brake piston areas with brake cleaner or detergent water and toothbrush. Then use a flat bar of metal or a painter's stick to put up in there and push the pistons completely in until flush with the inside surfaces of the caliper, otherwise those nice new fat brake pads won't fit. Note the top of each pad is fitted with a notched dog ear. That dog ear engages a slot in the top of the caliper and the notch is loaded with that aformentioned flat spring. You know you have the pads fully in when you feel the springiness when you push up. Both pads so inserted and while holding some upward pressure on them, slide the well lubed pin (you can use silicone grease or brake parts grease -- DO NOT GET any lube or foreighn matter on the pad faces or rotor face) back through the caliper and pads holes. Put a small dib of silicone grease to cover the end of the pin and replace the neoprene plug. Slowly/firmly pump the foot and hand brake to re-set the pistons. Done.

prs
 

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brake pads

Given the warnings abut possible over full master cylinders above; otherwise this jop is EZ, but take care -- its you brakes for Heaven's sake!

All three calipers have similar pads, the rear OE pads are thicker. Grasp the caliper assembly with your hands and push in toward the bike firmly, then pull it outward formly. Repeat several times to push the caliper pistons inaward to make room for the pads to be loose. Do not activate the hand or foot brake after remving pads, unless you just like pushing pistons in with a tool. Each caliper has a small black neoprene plug toward the bottom. Remove that plug to expose a hex socket screw. Remove the screw. There is a pin behind that screw that you can see between teh bottom of the "sandwitch" formed by the two pads and rotor. You can use needle nosed pliers to grasp the part of the pin you can see and tease the pin outward to where the hex screw was. Hold one hand under the pads as they will likely fall out as the pin is removed.

The pads will fall straight down once the pin released them. There is a slight initial downward spring tension from a flat spring in the top of the caliper. Make a mental note of how the pads are oriented as they drop down. One will have a backing shim that rides upon the brake pistons, the other will not. It is a good idea to clean the brake piston areas with brake cleaner or detergent water and toothbrush. Then use a flat bar of metal or a painter's stick to put up in there and push teh pistons completely in until flush with the inside surfaces of the caliper, otherwise those nice new fat brake pads won't fit. Note the top of each pad is fitted with a notched dog ear. That dog ear engages a slot in the top of the caliper and the notch is loaded with that aformentioned flat spring. You know you have the pads fully in when you feel the springiness when you push up. Both pads so inserted and while holding some upward pressure on them, slide the well lubed pin (you can use silicone grease or brake parts grease -- DO NOT GET any lube or foreighn matter on the pad faces or rotor face) back through the caliper and pads holes. Put a small dib of silicone grease to cover teh end of teh pin and replace the neoprene plub. Slowly/firmly pump the foot and hand brake to re-set the pistons. Done.

prs
+ 1 and this can be done on the center stand but is easier on a jack
 

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An' I wuz sober win I tieped dat.

prs
 
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