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Plate and 6 screws in left ankle fibula from a spiral fracture due to a new front tire. But it was a long time ago, September 1998. I had just put a new Iroquois brand (anyone remember them?) front tire on our '95 Suzuki Intruder 1400. I was just going to take it in to get a full tank of gas for the next morning's commute. The wife and I had gone about 300 yards to the first turn, a slow, sharp left. I braked and down we went! Long painful story short- after months of healing from road rash, above mentioned broken ankle surgery and broken ribs (wife was fortunate to only have had road rash, nothing broken), I was able to get down to see the bike. No one was able to figure out what happened exactly. Neither the State Trooper, my next door neighbor (and member of the same motorcycle club we were in) and a whole lot of looky loos, could figure out what had happened. I was wondering myself. After months, finally, when I rubbed my hand on the tire it was like getting a hand lube treatment. My hand was slick from the silicon mold release agent! 2 hard lessons learned 1) never buy tires cheap, old tires from a car tire shop (they had been on the shelf a while, hard), 2) take the "break in" period serious! I've always taken it easy on new tires after that! The dealerships used to red stamp the customer copy of the receipt with the message "New tires should be broken in for 100 miles or more" and they would be sure to tell you that verbally also. Tires, like so many things motorcycle related, have improved vastly since then!
 

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I think the mold release agent is a thing of the past but still recommendations:
Dunlop:
When new tires are fitted, they should not be subjected to maximum power or hard cornering until a reasonable run-in distance of approximately 100 miles has been achieved.
This is necessary for a number of reasons. Replacements for worn tires with different patterns and construction will not react the same. Also, a new tire is stiffer than an old tire. The new tire has a rounder tread profile, different contact patch and “lean-over edge” than the worn profile of an old tire. The new tire will also not react the same in combination with its remaining tire.
Carrying out the required run-in will allow you to become accustomed to the “feel” of the new tires and tire combinations, so you are better able to achieve optimum road grip for use in high speed, high acceleration and handling situations.

Bridgestone:
Use care when riding on new tires. We Recommend that you ride slowly and carefully for the first 60 miles (~100Km) until you become accustomed to the performance of your new tires in conjunction with your motorcycle. We recommend avoiding extreme maneuvers, including sudden acceleration, maximum braking and hard cornering, until you have become accustomed to the performance of your tires in conjunction with your motorcycle.
 

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I think the mold release agent is a thing of the past but still recommendations:
Dunlop:
When new tires are fitted, they should not be subjected to maximum power or hard cornering until a reasonable run-in distance of approximately 100 miles has been achieved.
This is necessary for a number of reasons. Replacements for worn tires with different patterns and construction will not react the same. Also, a new tire is stiffer than an old tire. The new tire has a rounder tread profile, different contact patch and “lean-over edge” than the worn profile of an old tire. The new tire will also not react the same in combination with its remaining tire.
Carrying out the required run-in will allow you to become accustomed to the “feel” of the new tires and tire combinations, so you are better able to achieve optimum road grip for use in high speed, high acceleration and handling situations.

Bridgestone:
Use care when riding on new tires. We Recommend that you ride slowly and carefully for the first 60 miles (~100Km) until you become accustomed to the performance of your new tires in conjunction with your motorcycle. We recommend avoiding extreme maneuvers, including sudden acceleration, maximum braking and hard cornering, until you have become accustomed to the performance of your tires in conjunction with your motorcycle.
That all sounds sensible.
 
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