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Discussion Starter #1
How hard is it to break the bead on a Goldwing tire? After watching Fred's DVD's on how the remove the front and rear tires, I now know how easy that is. Question is can I break the bead?

I am going to replace the OEM rubber valves with the FOBO T-Valves and would rather not take the tires down to the local dealer to have them installed. I don't need to remove the tire, just break the bead so that I can remove the old valve and install the new. I found this video on youtube...anyone think this is feasible?

 

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I've done it with a Hi-Lift(handyman) jack under the trailer hitch on my pickup on regular car wheels so a bike tire shouldn't be too hard.
 
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I put a jack on top of the tire as close to the bead as possible, slide it under my truck and jack up the truck, which in turn jacks down the tire until it breaks the bead.
 

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I manually change (NoMar tire changer) a fair amount of tires. I invested in a BeadBuster. It easily breaks the bead on all the tires I've ever changed.

https://beadbuster.com/
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Another question...anyone know how much to torque the nut on the bottom of the FOBO T-Valve (inside the rim)?

Thank you!
 

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You can break the bead as it is in the video. If you are going to do the fronts, I suggest building a 2x4 box (on edge) with the inside dimensions slightly larger than the outside of the brake rotor. Carefully set the wheel down into this box without putting pressure on the rotor. You could remove the rotors but the recommendation is not to reuse the bolts... (something like $3 each IIRC). In an emergency valve stem replacement (on the road, on a Saturday night, of a holiday weekend)I have also used C-clamps to break the bead, and hold the tire over to the side while I threaded the new valve stem in.

???suit on...
 
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Why not just wait until the next tire change to change the valve stems ?
 

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2x4 are too flexible to break beads, and as mentioned will flex and break before working. I finally made my own bead breaker, but for 35yrs or so just used a big c-clamp. Put a piece of wood backing on the side you are not breaking, then tighten down to break the bead on the other side. Works OK, not wonderful, but does the trick usually.
 

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I was worried for a second, I read your title as Baking Bread on My Tire...

Be sure to put lots of butter on the tire before baking bread on it so it doesn't stick.
 

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I use the 2x4 with the dropper bolted to the timber, loose enough so I can move it but it stays where I put it.
The 6ft 2x4 is bolted to an exposed stud in my shed, on edge, tight enough to hold it but loose enough to raise and lower it.

20 second job to remove it from the stud and store it upright in a handy place for next time.
Easy-peasy and little effort required, and operated from a standing position.


Edit. I made a box so I don't have to remove the discs.
 

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With the support of other members, I replaced my oem valve stems with t-valves while the tires were still on the bike using a large C clamp. Of course, my F6b does not have the sensors to worry about.
 

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I'm a fan of the T-stem. But not THAT much.

Start using your FOBO right away. When you need to put air in, just unscrew the FOBO cap. It's no big deal, it's just another cap unless you fuss with the locknut. Don't use the little plastic locknut, or do it hand tight. The real "anti-theft" feature is the code lock to your account, not the locknut. Sure, there's a risk your cap will come off as the locknut serves that purpose, too, but I don't think that's much of a risk.

When it is time for new rubber, put the T-stem in then.

My two cents.

Good luck if you choose to do it now. Just because. I understand that reasoning! But it's not essential.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
When it is time for new rubber, put the T-stem in then.

My two cents.
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Right on the FOBO box it says 'Strongly recommend to only use with metal valves'. Since I have the OEM 90 degree rubber valves...I am thinking it would be wise to avoid any potential rapid lose of air type situations.

I just received the FOBO T-Valves and am going to wait to use the sensors until I have metal under them!
 

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:agree:

My bad. Well done not listening to me. :22yikes::eek:4::bow:

I was thinking about my different model year, OEM metal stems, and just spewed nonsense that was wrong for you.

But it would have been awesome advice if you had metal stems. >:)
 

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If you are not going to reuse tires, a little bit of gasoline dribbled along the bead line makes the rubber slimy. I have used this on my old GW tires, but not good for rubber.
 

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When using FOBO’s (or other TPMS for that matter) the process works well to overfill the tire, check the readout, then loosen the sender letting a little air escape at a time until you reach the desired pressure...

Love my FOBO, but not on rubber mounted stems...

:thumbup:
 

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I really do wonder why blokes use all manner of lube for fitting tyres, petrol or butter has been mentioned.


How about a tub of Tyre mounting paste?
 

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