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Just thought I throw this out there for the guys like me that are in no way 'wrenches' but still perform some of the easier stuff.

2018 DCT.........my second oil change..........I did the first one no problem at all......................on this 2'nd oil change, I just could not get the DCT filter cap back on correctly. Out of frustration, like an IDIOT, after many tries I thought to myself "it must be sitting ( the cap ) flush/correctly."

I went to tighten it up kinda knowing it really wasn't right ( am I an IDIOT or what ?? ) ....yes, I am. ................and I broke one of those small bolts off at the head. Shredded the gasket too.

Needless to say, the $$$$ I saved on doing a relatively mundane task on my own, turned into more $$$. I know, I know............I'm an idiot.

My advice is to take your time and make sure things are correct. I've changed the oil on my bikes for the past 30 years. My first screw-up.

If there's any one thing that you can't screw up on a combustion engine, it's the oil. Luckily for me, I was able to ride the bike over to a shop ( NOT a Honda dealer ) that's 4 miles from me. No leaks riding over. I realize it WOULD leak eventually and VERY SOON. This guy builds bikes among other things. A perfect guy to bring it to for a job like this.
 

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Don't feel too bad. The design of the DCT oil filter cover cap makes it difficult to get back on properly sometimes, and the fact that you're pushing against the spring on the bottom of the filter doesn't help matters any. Not to mention you're working upside down when you do it. You almost need a tiny little jack to help push against the cover plate and get it into place so you can thread the screws in.
 

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So I take it your all set now, happy, (a bit disappointed in yourself) but learned something............. *trust me* we've all done it!! BUT your man enough, to admit it.... That's better then 99% of the rest of us!

Ronnie
 

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When I changed my DCT Clutch filter I had already bought and viewed Fred's video and knew to take special care when reinstalling that cover. I used the previous Goldwing model fork O-ring. I carefully placed the cover back on the engine and slowly hand tighten each back until the cover was flush with the engine case while laying on my back. I then snugly tightened the two bolt using no torque wrench. So far no leaks.
 
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I think that using the o-ring from the fork cap of the previous goldwings makes getting the DCT filter cap back on properly a lot easier (though still no picnic :shock:).

I like to get one of the cap screws started and then push the cap up and hold it fully seated in place with one hand and then get the other screw started and run them all the way up by hand before tightening with a wrench. The problem with doing that when using the standard o-ring (beside the fact that at least three hands are really needed :eek:4:) is that the o-ring is too thin to give you any "feel" for when/if the cap is pushing into the housing properly (straight and all the way seated).

With the fork cap o-ring, you can feel the o-ring friction against the wall of the housing over and above the pressure of the spring and it makes for a lot more confidence that the cap is on correctly and that the o-ring did not get pinched in there.
 

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Somehow, when I change oil on the DTCs, I don't seem to have the problems others are experiencing. I do some on a center stand, while others I do on a lift. Possibly it is because I use OEM cataloged parts. I know some here use a non-cataloged o-ring ... if that is the case, my advise is to use correct parts and more practice. In either case, I've never had any problems.
 

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Don't feel too bad. The design of the DCT oil filter cover cap makes it difficult to get back on properly sometimes, and the fact that you're pushing against the spring on the bottom of the filter doesn't help matters any. Not to mention you're working upside down when you do it. You almost need a tiny little jack to help push against the cover plate and get it into place so you can thread the screws in.
I've done something similar to Fred's suggestion. I measured the distance from the bottom of the filter cover to the top of my lift, (or floor), and cut a 1" dowel just shy of that measurement. I then inserted the filter, spring and cover, aligned the bolt holes then "propped" everything into place with the dowel. The bolts now go in easily and you can use both hands to manipulate everything into place. Works for me.
 

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Coming from you Fred, I'm guessing this is real ?? Not a sick joke on a dummy like me ?? This has to be a joke, right ??

Well, yes and no. It is real, but I don't think you can buy one anywhere. If you could find one of the right height, I believe it would actually work. The post above to cut a dowel also seems like a good workaround.
 

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After reading this and I don't own a 2018+ Goldwing, I was thinking if the bolt holes go all the way through the housing, why not go to Lowes or Home Depot and buy a much longer bolts and and screw them in evenly as the cover goes up to be seated. As it gets close, then substitute one a time the bolts until you are using the stock bolts. Using different size dowels (longer) as you change out the bolts.
 

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After reading this and I don't own a 2018+ Goldwing, I was thinking if the bolt holes go all the way through the housing, why not go to Lowes or Home Depot and buy a much longer bolts and and screw them in evenly as the cover goes up to be seated. As it gets close, then substitute one a time the bolts until you are using the stock bolts. Using different size dowels (longer) as you change out the bolts.

This won't work, the bolts thread into the bottom of the engine case, and if you try to use a longer bolt you'll damage the case and/or the engine/transmission internals.
 

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The broken threaded stub will almost certainly turn out easily with just finger pressure or teasing with sharp awl, it is just sitting there relaxed in an oily hole. Then you or your mechanic can tell us how much oil is lost when removing just the tranny filter. ;-) Maybe not so much.

As for Fred's suggestion, I believe I would use a piece of common schedule 40 PVC water pile of 1" or 2" diameter cut to length as a prop. I have not had trouble (knocking on wood here) getting mine aligned, yet. I have a few spare OE "O" rings that I bought with filters and spare spring and bolts,etc; but my original ring is still in use. I also have some of the previous generation fork seal "O" rings that I had for my 2002.

I do clean the "O" ring seat and then paste the "O" ring in with a small dib of thick 'n tacky grease (no silicone, we have catalytic exhaust). Then take care to orient the cover plate so it can be pushed up into place without any twisting motion.

prs
 
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Just finished the oil change and it wasn't the least liked oil change I've ever done. I think the biggest problem was the height of my oil pan, must get a much lower profile.


I started with the dowel trick by thinking I'd just hold it in place but I wasn't as sensitive with feeling how the bolt was going in so I pulled the dowel out and just used my hand, went in just fine.


Now to the crank case breather inspection, hey Fred, where's the instructions :) If I recall, I don't have to pull a plug to let it drain out.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Somehow, when I change oil on the DTCs, I don't seem to have the problems others are experiencing. I do some on a center stand, while others I do on a lift. Possibly it is because I use OEM cataloged parts. I know some here use a non-cataloged o-ring ... if that is the case, my advise is to use correct parts and more practice. In either case, I've never had any problems.
I hear you. I don't have a lift. I'm SURE having the bike up there would make it a lot easier.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The broken threaded stub will almost certainly turn out easily with just finger pressure or teasing with sharp awl, it is just sitting there relaxed in an oily hole. Then you or your mechanic can tell us how much oil is lost when removing just the tranny filter. ;-) Maybe not so much.

As for Fred's suggestion, I believe I would use a piece of common schedule 40 PVC water pile of 1" or 2" diameter cut to length as a prop. I have not had trouble (knocking on wood here) getting mine aligned, yet. I have a few spare OE "O" rings that I bought with filters and spare spring and bolts,etc; but my original ring is still in use. I also have some of the previous generation fork seal "O" rings that I had for my 2002.

I do clean the "O" ring seat and then paste the "O" ring in with a small dib of thick 'n tacky grease (no silicone, we have catalytic exhaust). Then take care to orient the cover plate so it can be pushed up into place without any twisting motion.

prs
Thanks !!! Like I said, I did the first oil change....1,2,3. Done !! This may seem like heresy to you and others,........ I OFTEN use the same gasket more than once. If it's "OK,' I'll use it again. But, I know ( pretty sure, anyway :wink2::wink2: ? I've seen on this site that the small DCT filter gasket from Honda is a little big. I'm going to use the one Fred uses. Have the part # written down.

This prop you're talking about ?? WHY didn't I think of something like that myself ??? :surprise::surprise:
 
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