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Discussion Starter #1
I've done the Bun Burner and saddle sore, But I can't imagine doing a bun Burner Gold. I figure an 18 hour driving day is my limit. I'd have to average 83.3 mph for 18 hours to make the goal. Of course actual top speed would be much higher when fuel stops are figured in. for those who have done the BBG, how fast/how long did you travel?
 

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Danomite33 said:
I've done the Bun Burner and saddle sore, But I can't imagine doing a bun Burner Gold. I figure an 18 hour driving day is my limit. I'd have to average 83.3 mph for 18 hours to make the goal. Of course actual top speed would be much higher when fuel stops are figured in. for those who have done the BBG, how fast/how long did you travel?
1500 miles in a 24 hour period is a Bun Burner Gold.

I did mine in a little over 22 hours. Averaged about 75 mph.

Nothing but hard riding. 10 minute stops for fuel, stretch, and piss breaks, then back on the bike again.

I wouldn't want to do it again... :wink:
 

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Danomite33 said:
...how fast/how long did you travel?
As stated above, about 22 hours. Unlike the non-extreme rides, time management is critical to keep speed within reason and not draw unnecessary attention from law enforcement.
 

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I did mine in about 22 1/2 hours. I find that 4:00 a.m.-ish is when I get the most sleepy, plus I'd rather ride in the daylight, so I minimized my night riding by picking a summer day, starting at dawn, and riding from east to west.
 

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Like the others, 22 1/2 hours. Really hit a wall at about the 19 or 20 hour point. A real SOB at that point. I paced the fastest vehicle I could find and when I had no other, I ran at 75. Eat and drink in the saddle, fill and pee and go again.
 

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23 hours 13 minutes.
We hit bad traffic twice on I-10 (hurricane had blown away half the road and an entire bridge) and we had to stop while EMS tried to talk a "jumper" off a bridge in Gainesville, FL; she eventually jumped and a cop who was tethered to a light pole actually caught her in mid-flight.
Drama.
We might've gone a little fast here and there but nothing we wouldn't normally do.
It's funny just how good a BK cheeseburger tastes after 1,000 miles of only Powerbars...
 

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I have done one BB1500. Tough
 

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We normally traveled about 10 over the speed limit unless we could find a good rabbit to follow that was going faster. I did mine with my wife on the back. A buddy on his 1500 and me on my 1800. We only stopped when we needed gas and limited the stops to 10 minutes. Finished in 23 hours and 10 minutes.
 

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Danomite33 said:
I've done the Bun Burner and saddle sore, But I can't imagine doing a bun Burner Gold. I figure an 18 hour driving day is my limit. I'd have to average 83.3 mph for 18 hours to make the goal. Of course actual top speed would be much higher when fuel stops are figured in. for those who have done the BBG, how fast/how long did you travel?

To answer your questions, my 1546 mile BBG was done in 23 hours (a 67.2 mph average) and my typical cruising speed averaged 75-80 mph. The top speed on my GPS was 83 mph which was exactly the same speed the South Dakota trooper's radar said when I got caught following a "rabbit" near Rapid City.

On that BBG ride, I left home, well rested, at about 6:00 PM and rode steadily until 6:00 AM, when I stopped for a 30 minute Iron Butt Motel nap. The rest of the ride was a grind but fatigue was not a major issue. Indeed, I was surprised at how good I felt at the end of the ride. I attribute my success on the BBG to good planning, discipline, perserverance and good luck.....not high speeds.

I applaud you for admitting you have an "18 hour limit". IMO, most long distance riders have a similar daily limit but they learn work around it in order to ride truly big mileages, just as my 30 minute nap allowed me to continue riding for another 11 hours.

By the way, please don't try to ride 1500 miles in 18 hours!!!!
 

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It took me about 22.5 hours. Most of the advice is very good. About all I can add is go with the flow of traffic and you will average 5 to 15 over the posted speed limit. Also, plan your route to avoid large cities during rush hours like 7am, noon, and 5pm. That is what kept me from doing the Border-to-Border Insanity. I got tied up in San Antonio and Austin early morning traffic jams. No biggie, I was only shooting for the 36 hour ride and the 24 hour would have just been a bonus. I ended up taking a couple of scenic tours along the way and taking a few extended breaks to just watch traffic and people and to relax. One of these days I will do the Coast-to-Coast.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Congratualations to all on your successful BBGs. :D I think I'll pass on this challenge and be happy with the regular SS and BB pins.
 

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My recommendation is if you want to do a BBG, work up to it and be ready to pack it in if things go wrong or just plain don't work out for you. Forcing a bad situation may be a receipt for disaster. Have a good plan in place that avoids situations that will impact you staying in the saddle with minimal breaks. If you are looking at faster speeds to get the job done, you are going at it in the wrong way IMHO. Higher speeds equals more gas stops which equals longer time. This ride is about time management, not high speed and avoiding cops.

I did mine in 23 hours and besided gas stops (<8 minutes each), we took one 45 minute break for food and a rest at 3am, the time your body most wants to sleep. Our speed was generally 5-8 mph over posted limit. That kept us just a little faster than the flow of traffic but not so much as to draw unwanted attention. Pick a route that has a posted speed of >=70 mph, few if any metro areas, straight and boring interstate, and work on minimizing your "out-of-saddle" time. If you want to make it more challenging on future rides, you can pick a tougher route but I would make your first one as easy as possible. I would also create some work-up rides that push your limits for staying awake and alert. It you find that unsafe or unobtainable, maybe your decision to back off from this goal is wise.

Organize your bike, clothing, gear, and paperwork with an eye toward not wasting time. As I tell a friend that has recently gotten the IBA bug - "Simplify, minimize, streamline". The goal of this ride is to make >1500 miles within 24 hours. It is not to have a good time, it is not to take pictures, it is not to see the sights and you are guarenteed to fail if you fiddle-fart around! Don't let anything divert time or attention to not achieving your goal. I tried to give us a buffer of at least an hour in our planning. SOMETHING will come up to eat away at your plan so if your don't build in a buffer, you will end up failing and have to start all over again.

Try to rotate gas credit card use so they don't get turned off, keep them handy so you almost have them out by the time you stop by the pump. Keep your helmet on for gas stops. Remember that anything that you take off at a stop takes away time and then you waste more time to put it back on before you can get moving again. You can even ride the planned route in advance to pick out which gas stations and pumps have reliable printers. Maximize your range by not short stopping your fuel use. If you can go 225 mile on one tank, try to pick gas stops that let you get 190-200 miles between fill ups.

I would say that the BBG was the most difficult IBA ride I have undertaken and I now know that it stretched me to my personal limit (at that point in my life). The pay off is that it returned to me a personal sense of accomplishment that surpassed most anything else in my life. If it was easy, anyone could do it and it would mean little.

P.S. My buddy and I planned extensively before attempting our first BBG and we were able to follow our plan and were successful on our first attempt. I am probably more proud of that than of the certificate!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hi Mark: Your idea of rotating credit cards is spot on as I have had mine cut off in the past. BTW, I'm down the street from you in Mojave. Been "temporarily" assigned here since Feb. You folks have some really nice places to visit out here...very nice indeed.

Dan
 

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Just call your credit card and explain you are charging frequent gas on a extended trip
 

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laen said:
Just call your credit card and explain you are charging frequent gas on a extended trip
That works on some cards (like Chevron) for some people and not for others. There are other cards that consistantly refuse to make a change like that to your account, no matter how logical your explaination or dire your need. Not sure why. Maybe customer service reps were having a good or bad day depending on outcome. I have others tell me that they got a NO answer with no recourse. If someone does have problems getting their account left open with frequent use for these IBA rides, I would just keep calling their customer service line back until you get someone having a good day. Maybe they will get tired of getting your calls and give in. One guy told me that it took 4 tries to finally get them to change it on his card. Weird.

I was doing a SS with a stop in Las Vegas for gas at a Shell mini-mart type station and had issues getting a receipt at the pump. Going inside, I was asked for my home address including zip code and home phone number. When I asked why, they responded "everyone around here seems to have stolen credit cards so it is this store's policy to require this information". What kind of BS is that! I told them I would go elsewhere before I gave them all that info. I went back outside and paid with a Visa card with no problem other than the printer was crapped out. Went back inside and they gave me a duplicate receipt.

Oh, one other weird thing happend on that ride. At a Fastop station at the finish, the printer outside listed their corporate headquarter address someplace in Florida on the receipt, even though the station was in California. It was a newly installed computer system and they were eventually able to get me an inside receipt with the proper date, time, and address.

Lesson learned:

ALWAYS CHECK YOUR RECEIPT FOR THE APPROPRIATE DATE, TIME, AND LOCATION BEFORE LEAVING THE STATION! THIS IS EVEN MORE IMPORTANT ON THE START AND FINISH LOCATIONS
 

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Orange Bandit said:
Like the others, 22 1/2 hours. Really hit a wall at about the 19 or 20 hour point. A real SOB at that point. I paced the fastest vehicle I could find and when I had no other, I ran at 75. Eat and drink in the saddle, fill and pee and go again.
Yeah, I stopped several times in the last couple of hours to walk around the bike a few times. Then I listened to the entertainment on the CB - I was riding though Nevada on I-80, and, at 2:00 am, there was considerable soliciting going on... :lol: Once I got to the end of the ride, I wound up visiting with the convenience store clerk for an hour or so; I wasn't the slightest bit sleepy! :roll:
 

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Why is it that way, You fight sleepiness, barely can hang on to the bike, finish the run and your not a bit sleepy, ??? Why ???
 
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