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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can someone suggest a set of tire changing tools that I could purchase for removing old tire and installing new tire with inflicting any damage to the wheel(s)? :confused:

Any caveats and suggestions would be appreciated. :22yikes:

Have always paid the 'shop' to do my tire changing... now that I am retired and have time on my hands, it is time I started changing my own tires. I have a bike jack (http://www.harborfreight.com/automo...ands/high-position-motorcycle-lift-99887.html) so I need to gather my own collection of tire changing tools. :thumbup:

Again, thanks, in advance!
 

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Wing tires are tough to change, so you need good tools.

I made my own mounting tools, but most on this forum seem to favor the Nomar tools.
 

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Google and visit NoMar tire tools dot com to see the videos. Consider the Cycle Hill changer outfit made by NoMar and DO buy the MoJo Lever from Preston Drake. The NoMar bar just does not have the guts to take on tough GL18 tires. If your vehicle has a 2" receiver hitch, that is the way to go in mounting the tire changer. I use a modified Harbor Frieght stand and MoJo Lever.

prs
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks to Ed & Pigeon R.

I'll get the goodies on order & let you guys know how it turned out! Whoops... just realized, gota order the tire, also! :roll:

Again, many thanks! :thumbup:
 

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I'm retiring next June and just paid $500 for 2 Elite 3's installed. Then add another $25 for Dyna Beads and it is getting expensive. When I mention to my wife I want to try changing the tires she says not worth the effort. Well, maybe I need to send her back to work to pay for it. Using Fred's video's I have changed the air filter and did my plugs. Plugs done before video purchased and a simple task. Next up, coolant and brake bleed. That only leaves the tires as a challenge. I see I could buy the tires for $299 plus $50 shipping. Saves $150 over dealer change but would take allot of tires changes to pay for the tools. Still comtemplating.
 

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Here’s how I do it with hand tools. What you need is:
3ea. Pit Posse tire irons http://pitposse.com/101sptiir.html
NoMar Yellow Thing http://www.nomartirechanger.com/products/10
2ea. Nomar tire spoons http://www.nomar-secure.com/product_p/ac-sb-21.htm
3ea Rim Protectors
Nomar tire lube, get both paste and spray. http://www.nomar-secure.com/category_s/4.htm
Bead Breaker http://www.aerostich.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=3551
6ea small wood blocks.
Go To Nomar and watch the GL1800 video to get the idea how to apply lube and use the blocks to make sure the tire drops into the drop center of the wheel. Of course they use the machine, but you can do the same thing working on the floor.
Lay the wheel on a soft surface and break both beads. Install the blocks per nomar instruction. Kneel on the tire and insert 3 pitposse tire tools, one at 12 oclock and the other 2 slightly off towards 11 and 1 oclock. Use rim protectors and lever all three levers toward you. If you do it right it's not all that difficult if the tire where your knees are drops into center as it should. Now remove the center iron and protector and move it over past the 1 oclock and lever off a little more tire. By this time you have it made and the rest of the tire will come right off. Now you've got the first half of the tire off. To get the tire off the wheel, insert your Nomar tire spoon, which has built in protector, through the tire and the lip of the spoon on the edge of the rim. The lip of the tool holds real nice on the edge of the rim then you use brute force to start the second half of the tire off the wheel. This is best done by laying the wheel flat on the floor tire side up, stand on the wheel as you pry with the Nomar spoon and pull on the tire with all your might. It will come off, trust me, it's the roughest part of the job.
Now install using nomar paste and spray as mentioned by Nomar. The first half of tire will go right on with no tools, the second half, use your nomar spoons to put on the majority of the tire, then install the Yellow thing at about the 1 oclock position. It keeps the tire from creeping off the wheel as it's being mounted, kneel on the tire, then slowly work the tire on using the nomar spoons. Best to spoon with one, hold it, then spoon with another, hold it and remove the first one, then repeat. Take little bites. That's it GL1800 tire change in a nutshell without a machine. Not impossible by any means.
 

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Drywall Screwed

I recently picked up a drywall screw somewhere. The tire pressure monitor came on alerting me of low pressure in one of my tires. I had just accelerated up the On-Ramp of I-75 in Tampa. I took the very next exit, pulled into shopping center and discovered a drywall screw in the rear tire. Wasn't near the side wall so I located the tire plugging kit I always carry. To make a long story short, I plugged the tire, inflated it using CO2 cartridges in the kit, proceeded to the nearest gas station and completed inflation to the proper pressure. Oops, still have a slow leak. Made it home (25 miles) before the low pressure light came back on. Tried a patch on the inside 2 days later, but nothing stopped the leak. Dunlop 250 tire is not smooth on the inside. I know what I did wrong, but I'm not telling. Probably a couple of things.

Ordered an OEM tire from Motorcycle Superstore late Monday and received it Wednesday 1PM via UPS Red. (thats only a day and a half) I was impressed, The price was right too.

My point is, I'll take a nail over a drywall screw any day, and I like the Superstore's service! :bow:
Don't know what this has to do with tire changing tools. Fluke 189's list looks good.
 

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I recently changed my GW1800 tires to Bridgestones. Money was at the time a little tight. Should have spent a little more and got a tire changing stand.

Like this:
http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p...CatId=8&keyword=tire+stand&prodFamilyId=28961



Really need something to hold the tire/rim in place while working on it.

Bought 3 Tusk 15" tire irons and 2 sets of rim protectors.

For a bead breaker used an 8" C-clamp and the tire irons.

You will need a valve core remover.
Also used 2 3/4" thick wood blocks for the rear and 2 1/2" blocks for the front. 3 blocks of each size may have made it a little easier.

A spray bottle with soapy water for lube.

Use the wood blocks to really push the bead into the rim drop and your irons to work the bead over the rim. If the bead is not pushed down, you cannot mount the tire. Take small bites and once you get about 40% of the rim off, you are pretty much home.

Go to YouTube and watch the videos. If you don't have a tire changing station, don't watch those.

Mounting is pretty much the reverse. Wood blocks at 4 & 8 o'clock on the the rim to push the tire bead down into the lubed rim drop and rim protectors from 10 to 2 o'clock. First iron at the 9 o'clock, other at the 3 o'clock position. Third iron works over a small section of tire, and becomes the holding iron while the adjacent iron now works the tire. Keep the bites small and the effort is relatively modest.

Don't be too shy with the lube.

Front tire about the same, but really don't need as thick a block. 1/2" probably plenty.

Don't worry if the tire beads are not seated. They will probably seat when aired up. But you will need a tank. A 12V inflator probably will not have the big puff of air to seal the tire. Recommend a clip-on tire chuck (no tire valve) and a hose so you can stand back, just in case. If bead does seat by 50 psi, break the bead and re-lube.

It can be done at home without a big expensive tire changing station. It will be more work and it will take a little longer.

Also you may want to take the opportunity while your tires are off to take a look at your brake pads, especially the left front and the rear.

For balancing, went with the DynaBeads.

My total was about $60. But will add the $85 tire changing stand for the next set. Local shop wanted $44 per tire (carry-in). $180 for ride-in/ride-out.
 

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beware of using soap/water as it corrodes aluminum. I read this for years and never believed it as I've changed 100 tires this way. Well I changed my dad's 84 Goldwing tires and after a few months the front is flat even though it has no puncture and only like 50 miles on it. Wheel corroded and bead leaked from soap. Learned my lesson and no longer use soap.
 

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fluke, my home made tire lube is soap based. RuGlide is soap based. NoMar liquid and NoMar paste are soap based. No problems with any of those and aluminum wheels on our bikes. All of those are based upon glycerin soap, maybe that makes a difference.

prs
 

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Google and visit NoMar tire tools dot com to see the videos. Consider the Cycle Hill changer outfit made by NoMar and DO buy the MoJo Lever from Preston Drake. The NoMar bar just does not have the guts to take on tough GL18 tires. If your vehicle has a 2" receiver hitch, that is the way to go in mounting the tire changer. I use a modified Harbor Frieght stand and MoJo Lever.

prs
i bought a cycle hill changer and in my opinion it is junk, went back to using my homemade changer and a Mojo Lever it works much better
 

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I know most people use Harbor Freight or Nomar tire changers but if you want to make the job easy, invest in a motorcycle air/ electric changer. About $1000 is all I paid and there's no bolting down to the floor or any of that stuff. I had the harbor freight but wasn't happy with the results.
 

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Go visit your local vocational/Tech school. See if they have a automotive technology class. Cultivate a relationship with the teacher, Most are looking for things to teach/show their students on a regular basis. The school that I use has top of the line hunter equipment. Keep in mind that if you go this route there will be students doing the work...
greg
 

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A few people have said they can change tires with nothing but hand tools (in previous threads) but I sure would like to see the videos. Not that I don't believe them, I just want to see the effort and technique involved.
 

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Ther Harbor Freight set up can be made to work quite well with some simple mods and a Mojo Lever or No-scuff tire tool. Mojo blacks do a good job of preventing scratching. With a decent set up, it really comes down to technique and practice. And very, very important if you want to make the job easy, warm up that tire. Lay it out in the sun, use a heat gun or hair dryer etc. A warm tire goes on much easier than a cold one....a lesson I learned this winter!!!
 

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Mounting Gl1800 Tires are hell to pay with hand tools! Learn to pull the wheels off and do yourself and god a favor, find a good shop that will go ahead and mount em for ya for about 30-35 bucks off the bike, throw a couple of ounces of dyna beads in em and ride!!
 

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I know most people use Harbor Freight or Nomar tire changers but if you want to make the job easy, invest in a motorcycle air/ electric changer. About $1000 is all I paid and there's no bolting down to the floor or any of that stuff. I had the harbor freight but wasn't happy with the results.

I have a guy that changes mine $30 a wheel balanced so that's about 33 tires or 15 pr max twice a yr so it would take at least 7 years to pay it back So I think I'll just cough up the $30 when I need to and keep the $1000 in my jeans
 

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Bugeyedturkey
Back in 1990 I had a 84 Aspencade. I decided I need new tires . I bought a set of tire tools and a bead breaker clamp from J C Whitley.( The two tires tools were about 9 " long) The big day came .I took the rim off the bike. broke the tire down and it was a chore to do this and started using the tire tools to take the tire off. That tire and I fought all over the gragage . At times I was on top and at times the tire was on top . after about hour With the help from my wife I won amd got the tire off . It was anothe fight to get the tire back on the rim. . My wife said the next time you can carry to a shop and have the tire taken off and mounted . So I found good tire shop that had one of them tire changer that they use on those high dollar mag or chrome wheel and let them do it. . Unless you can find 5 or 6 buddies that can go in together and buy a tire changer . I don't think it is worth the money to buy one . Just my 2 cents
thomas
 

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I have a guy that changes mine $30 a wheel balanced so that's about 33 tires or 15 pr max twice a yr so it would take at least 7 years to pay it back So I think I'll just cough up the $30 when I need to and keep the $1000 in my jeans
Oh, I wasn't justifying the economics of owning your own equipment or trying to convince anyone to do their own tire change. I enjoy doing my own work to my own specs and deadline. That's way more important to me than the cost.
 

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Changing tires with factory tpms

Only needed tires once so far and the dealer broke the sensor for the tpms when he installed the front tire. Just wonder if mounting tires is a little tricky with factory tpms. The No-mar looks like a great way to go.
 
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