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Discussion Starter #1
:?: Got a question.I was just getting ready to replace my tires,when the dealer and Honda America gave me a new rear tire free of charge with the frame weld and ECM change out.I built a copy of the "Coats" manual tire machine.and a static (bubble balancer).I also made my own jack which raises the bike 22 inches.I have changed tires on my 1500 and friends bikes with the machine and it works great.My question (finally) is has anyone changed the tires on a 1800.My mechanic tells me it is a bear to get the tires on the rims.He says that the Dunlops,which I like,go on easiest of all the brands.The machine in case you are not familiar is the type they use at the rallys because it is portable. Any input on the subject will be appreciated. Thanks Jim :tools1:
 

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Tire Changes

I have the Harbor Freight Tools changer and MC adapter. Have changed my rear tire twice and front 3 times. It is a bear. From now on I will only do the front and take the rear to the dealer. I can do the front in a matter of 10 minutes once the wheel is off the bike. The rear takes me close to an hour to remove and replace after the wheel is off the bike, time that could be better spent riding.

Brian
 

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I've used tire irons to mount 3 sets on my 1800 and like he says its a bear but a lot of people have posted that they have had good results with the harbor freight tire changer with motorcycle adapter so I'm sure you will get a lot of info before this post is over. :D
 

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I also have the Harbor tire changer and just received my Metzler tire balancer from Honda Direct Line. One of the most critical points to putting the new tire on the rim is to make certain you get the bead of the tire down inside towards the center of the rim or you'll simply struggle forever. It helps to place some blocks of wood in between the inside of the rim and the tire bead, it should help a lot.

DaleC
 

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Tire changin

Jim, I use ah Harbor Freight Tire Changer with three 16" tire irons & rim protectors ta change my tires at home, I git th tires from Honda Directline. Fred Harmon's tips on tire changin made th difference for me. Th wood wedges & th tie down strap are th secret ta gittin that stubborn rear tire back on th rim, i also bought some tire mounting lubricant at th auto parts store. I haven't balanced th last three sets of tires that i've worn out on my Wing, i just put em on & run em. :mrgreen:
 

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Ron, like you, my brother and I both change wing tires on our bikes, the 1500 wings, then this yr the 1800 wings. The Metzler tires went on nicely (using Fred's idea of a strap) and be SURE to use a lube to make the tire slide on easier.

We usually balance the tires, but the rear wheel on the 1800 doesn't fit our balance machine, so we've ran it un-balanced - and could NOT tell any difference.

ken
 
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I don't have a tire changer but do all my own tires. For a bead breaker I lay the wheel down on 4x4 blocks so the disks don't touch the ground. I lay a 4 foot 2x12 on the tire up against the rim and drive the car up on the 2x12 - this pops the tire off the bead, flip it over and do the other side.
Then I add some dish soap to the bead and roll it off with irons (I have an nice flat 12" pair) Back on with soap on the bead. I do the install with the wheel laid on the driveway blocks and use my knees to hold the tire into the center rim cavity ( I have good knees ) . This may seem rather crude but it works very well for me - also is good to know when you are out in the boonies with a flat. I alway carry the irons with me.
The real trick for me is the soap - it makes the bead slid in easier and lets you know if there is a leak.
:tools1: For balancing I clamp a 1" pipe in the vise and slip the axle into the wheel and hang the whole thing on the vise by inserting the axle into the 1" pipe. spin the wheel slowly and watch where it stops - add weight until it stops in random spots. Normally not much weight gets added.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks Y'all for the comments.I forgot to mention that I also made a clamp that uses a small bottle jack.I made it from aluminum plate and resembles a C clamp.I haven't used it yet but it will squeeze the tire to fit in the rim center.When I do use it and if it works I will let y'all know.Thanks again for the replies.This is a great board. Jim
 

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Storm

STORM My hat's off ta ya Bro ! I have also been changin my own bike tires for years. Th 1800 Wing tires are so stiff i had ta git somethin ta help me. I just walked in from th garage after puttin ah rear Metzler on my Wing. From start ta finish breakin out th tools ta puttin em away it took 1 hour 20 minutes, i did spend some time cleanin th rim bead with ah scotch brite pad. Th Harbor Freight Tire Changer is ah bargin at 75$ ta me it's worth 5 times what i paid for it. Yer Pal :mrgreen:
 
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I checked out the tire changer - Hinting for christmas - My knees arn't going to last forever :roll:
 

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The way I do it is a little different than most, but it goes very quickly. After the tires are off the bike I use a large c-clamp to brake the bead. After the bead is loose I take a ¼ pc of plywood and slide it between the rim edge and the bead of the tire. Then I take a reciprocating saw with a metal blade and cut the tire from bead to bead. It takes about 30 seconds and does not damage the wheel in any way. Then it’s just a simple matter of mounting the new tire and balancing. The last rear tire I did in this fashion took 25 minutes from beginning to end, including balancing. It is important, like others have pointed out, to make sure the bead of the new tire resides within the smallest diameter of the wheel while mounting the new tire. I have wood shims that insert between the bead resting place of the wheel and the bead of the tire to hold it in place.

David
 

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I've got my rear tire off, and thought I'd clean up the wheel before mounting it. My question is, does the dot go by the valve stem, or the heaviest part of the wheel? My heavy spot is the next spoke over from the stem. :?:
 

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Lucky Phil said:
I've got my rear tire off, and thought I'd clean up the wheel before mounting it. My question is, does the dot go by the valve stem, or the heaviest part of the wheel? My heavy spot is the next spoke over from the stem. :?:
I'm not an expert on this, but I think the dot mark on the tire lines up with the valve stem.
 

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The YELLOW dot indicates the lightest part of the tire, also known as "maximum force variation." This should be lined up with the heaviest part of the wheel - (usually) the valve stem. They call this "phase aligning" the tire.

DaleC
 

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Discussion Starter #20
To Lucky Phil

The blue spot is supposed to be the lightest point on the tire,which is supposed to line up with the heaviest point of the rim. which is usually the the valve stem.Unfortunately this is not always the case.I usually use this as a starting point and if I can move the tire on the rim I will move it to both side of the spot to see if I can improve on the balance before I add weights.I have a static balancer that I made and it has two bubble levels.One on the base and one on the part that the wheel hangs on.I move the tire on the rim untill I get as close as I can to balance,then I add weights to get the rest of the way. If I can't move the tire after it is mounted I just add weights.I hope this helps. Jim :rw1:
 
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