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Discussion Starter #1
I've always been amazed just how many of my "friends" have a military background and ride a motorcycle. Wonder why that might be... :?: :D :D :?:


Civilian versus Military Friends


CIVILIAN FRIENDS: Get upset if you're too busy to talk to them for a week.

MILITARY FRIENDS: Are glad to see you after years, and will happily carry on the same conversation you were having last time you met.


CIVILIAN FRIENDS: Never ask for food.

MILITARY FRIENDS: Are the reason you have no food.


CIVILIAN FRIENDS: Call your parents Mr. And Mrs.

MILITARY FRIENDS: Call your parents mom and dad.


CIVILIAN FRIENDS: Bail you out of jail and tell you what you did was wrong.

MILITARY FRIENDS: Would be sitting next to you saying, "Damn...we screwed up...but man that was fun!"


CIVILIAN FRIENDS: Have never seen you cry.

MILITARY FRIENDS: Cry with you.


CIVILIAN FRIENDS: Borrow your stuff for a few days then give it back.

MILITARY FRIENDS: Keep your stuff so long they forget it's yours.


CIVILIAN FRIENDS: Know a few things about you.

MILITARY FRIENDS: Could write a book with direct quotes from you.


CIVILIAN FRIENDS: Will leave you behind if that's what the crowd is doing.

MILITARY FRIENDS: Will kick the whole crowds’ ass that left you behind.


CIVILIAN FRIENDS: Would knock on your door.

MILITARY FRIENDS: Walk right in and say, "I'm home!"


CIVILIAN FRIENDS: Are for a while.

MILITARY FRIENDS: Are for life.


CIVILIAN FRIENDS: Have shared a few experiences...

MILITARY FRIENDS: Have shared a lifetime of experiences no Civilian
could ever dream of...


CIVILIAN FRIENDS: Will take your drink away when they think you've had enough.

MILITARY FRIENDS: Will look at you stumbling all over the place and say, "You better drink the rest of that, you know we don't waste...that's alcohol abuse!!" Then carry you home safely and put you to bed...


CIVILIAN FRIENDS: Will talk crap to the person who talks crap about you.

MILITARY FRIENDS: Will knock them the hell out for using your name in vain.


CIVILIAN FRIENDS: Will ignore this.

MILITARY FRIENDS: Will forward this.
 

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Always amazed me how close friends in the military can be when compared to our civilian counter parts. "We do take care of our own."
 

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Friends

Yo, thanks for the ride(s)! And ain't that the truth. Semper Fi!
 

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I have found that the ones with a military background have the attitude,"BEEN THERE DONE THAT"

Especially the ones that have seen combat.

Some of the feelings are, at least on my part is, "I've already been to HELL, what else can happen to me"

We appreciate freedom from a different prespective and have a bit of a different outlook on life.
 

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You're referring to SAILORS, here.

Sailors represent a unique friendship category. There's a profound reliance upon your shipmates, while challenging the unpredictable seas.

Not that the other branches of Military don't develop similarly reliant bonds; particularly, while in the trenches or under enemy firing.

As far as the 'motorcycle' connection, I guess, if we were 'dumb enough' to VOLUNTEER to be shot at, we don't have enough sense to recognize the inherent risks of our hobby??

Or, are we such 'free spirits', that we easily become enthralled with the exhilaration that we experience, from an encounter of thoroughly immersing ourselves, as part of our surroundings.
 

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8)

H-Man,
I take it all hand in hand, the wife says "ya traded in jumpin' outta perfectly good airplanes for ridin' a monster" I like that analogy and enjoy it everyday plus it doesn't make me knees hurt like other activities used to. :lol:
 

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Military Friends

Very good. I have never met a former or current military member that we couldn't immediately strike a chord of friendship. There is a kinsmanship between all of us that have served or are serving. It is a nice fraternity.

Even after 25 years with the police department, where the police brotherhood is supposed to be very close, I can count 5 brother officers that I/we consider "friends", the rest were co-workers.
 

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UBoat said:
CIVILIAN FRIENDS: Never ask for food.

MILITARY FRIENDS: Are the reason you have no food.
When's lunch? I'll be there.


Bob E.
 

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This might be a little long winded but bear with me…

A buddy of mine and I (He retired USAF, me 10 year USAF vet) are driving down the street with my 8 year old son in the back seat. We are both ‘bikers’, computer geeks, and prior enlisted…so… Anyway, there’s a biker stuck on the side of the road looking at his bike. We pull over to render aid (of course). It’s a little cold out so I tell my son to stay in the car.

Within a couple of minutes we have the guy patched well enough to make it home and he is back on his way. We climb back into the car and the first words out of my sons mouth was, ‘Dad was that a friend of yours?’. To which my response was, of course! He’s on a bike! We continued a fairly long conversation that summed up into this. If they’re on a bike, or bleed for the flag, they are assumed to be a friend until they prove otherwise.
 

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Freind

Yes what you said.
 

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I am much closer to my military friends than any civilan friends including ones who I grew up from early childood with. When you have shared the ultimate experience, nothing in civilan life can compare....
 

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Right on. I ride with a group made up mostly of retired military of all branches. We ride and eat after a couple of hours or so...the military always have long discussions, mostly military related, even though none of us served with anyone in the group. I feel that I could call on any one of them for help if needed, and they feel the same about me. Just a bond that is hard to explain to folks who never served. Ever had someone ask you "what's it like in the ______" and you try to tell them about your service, hard to do....if you ain't been there, you will never know.

29 years in the USAF, but decided not to make a career out of it.
 

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Just shared thanksgiving meal with my son and a number of his friends at the house of his boss on base. Had previously never met any of these men or their wives, walked up to the door and was greated like a long lost brother. Why, we all share the common bond of being soldiers. Present and past it's all one family.
 

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military

Semper Fi, my brothers

I thank the Navy for the boat rides, Marines can only walk on water so long.

USMC 64'-68'

Nam 67'-68'
 

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I've read the thread with great pride in the military and the lifelong friendships that develop because of one's service to our country.

But I came from a different background, a civilian, that has been taken in by the circle of military friendship.

My wife of 20 years, Leila, is from the Philippines and was married to a military man (Navy) while he was stationed there. Things did not go well and they divorced after several years.

Leila formed many close relationships with the military wives and their families during their marriage. I guess those relationships were in turn transferred to me as Leila's best friend's husband (31 years Navy, finally retired a few years ago) has become my best friend. So much so that we named our 19 year old son after him! As all have noted in this thread, his military friends are now my friends!

I had never experienced this kind of friendship before in my life, all that was stated in the original post I have found to be true for me during the past 20 years.

Obviously I can not share in some of the "Been there Done That" stories only those who have actually served in the Military can relate to but I do not feel like an outsider in any shape or form. I still feel a sense of loss though that I was not able to serve. I was ready to join the Navy back in 1971, but as you may recall, the US was in the middle of pulling out of 'Nam and had more personnel that they knew what to do with. I guess they didn't need one more recent High School graduate at that time...

I proudly fly the American Flag as well as the POW/MIA flag on my Goldwing to remind everyone of those that never came home.



I may not have served, but my heart still swells with the pride I have in our Military Service Men and Women.
 

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UBoat - Well said.

ETN-2(DV), USS Alexander Hamilton, SSBN-617, Blue crew, Charleston SC, Rota Spain, Med cruises, 1967-1975. Boomer bubble heads glow in the dark!
:flg:
 
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