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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My '12 Goldwing has clear coat wheels rims, but I'm wondering about using any form of mild car wax on
them protecting from pitted corrosion I read here so often.

Reason for Concern:
Around 1993 I bought new a Ford Explorer with clear coated aluminum rims.
Over 10 years time, I had all rims replaced because of the coating peeling off and turning the rims yellow,
(like the old convertible non glass rear windows turned from the sun years back).
I do remember waxing these rims and wonder if I did them more harm then good waxing with a mild car wax.

Now I'm concern about using wax on my 2012 rims on my GL1800.
Does clear coat need any wax protection at all??
Isn't that the reason of clear coating, protecting what's underneath.

No, I'm not interesting in powder coating them.

Cheers!
 

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No offense, but you're really overthinking this. Clearcoat is applied to protect the aluminum wheel from exposure to the elements and prevent corrosion. Wash them with mild detergent and water, apply a coat of wax if you want, it won't hurt a thing. The cause of the yellowing and peeling is unpreventable, no matter what you do. Road debris, sand, gravel, anything that impacts the wheel will eventually penetrate the clearcoat. Once that happens, it's only a matter of time before air and moisture get underneath and it begins to break down. Do your best to keep them clean and 10 years down the road when they look bad, have them stripped and recoated. Until then, ride it and enjoy.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
No offense,

Wash them with mild detergent and water,

Thanks, no offense taken.
So far that's what I'm been doing, a mild detergent and water, works for me.
 

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I WASH and WAX my rims all the time......I have to say that my rims are in perfect condition...............I am a total freak keeping my entire trike always clean and wax....Ever rainy day, I sit in my garage , with headphones on (rock out to Led Zeppelin) and give her an entire wax job.............

Ronnie
 

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We've had clear coat on the GW wheels from the very first bikes but it doesn't stand up well to the elements. It doesn't adhere well to the plain aluminium. If you ride in warm dryish conditions the wheels will stay OK. Definitely keep the winter salt away if you can. My first ones were replaced under warranty, when they too corroded it was aluminium paint or chrome powder coating, I've tried both. But I ride in the winter. Waxing helps prevent the dirt and brake dust adhering but does little against actual corrosion. IMHO, of course.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I WASH and WAX my rims all the time......I have to say that my rims are in perfect condition...............I am a total freak keeping my entire trike always clean and wax....Ever rainy day, I sit in my garage , with headphones on (rock out to Led Zeppelin) and give her an entire wax job.............

Ronnie

My kind of guy, keep your ride clean for the ladies...........:biker:
 

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If you do that, you'll get the most out of them. Many folks are looking for that magic formula that will make them last forever, but in the real world it just doesn't exist, so we do what we can.
 

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My '12 Goldwing has clear coat wheels rims, but I'm wondering about using any form of mild car wax on
them protecting from pitted corrosion I read here so often.

Reason for Concern:
Around 1993 I bought new a Ford Explorer with clear coated aluminum rims.
Over 10 years time, I had all rims replaced because of the coating peeling off and turning the rims yellow,
(like the old convertible non glass rear windows turned from the sun years back).
I do remember waxing these rims and wonder if I did them more harm then good waxing with a mild car wax.

Now I'm concern about using wax on my 2012 rims on my GL1800.
Does clear coat need any wax protection at all??
Isn't that the reason of clear coating, protecting what's underneath.

No, I'm not interesting in powder coating them.

Cheers!
As with your 93 Explorer, and your 2012 5th gen Wing, when it comes to "how to care for," "how to operate," and "how to maintain them," I would consult your Owner's Manual. Honda goes to great length to provide "care" instructions, and I would follow those long before I would follow anybody elses.
 

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We've had clear coat on the GW wheels from the very first bikes but it doesn't stand up well to the elements. It doesn't adhere well to the plain aluminium. If you ride in warm dryish conditions the wheels will stay OK. Definitely keep the winter salt away if you can. My first ones were replaced under warranty, when they too corroded it was aluminium paint or chrome powder coating, I've tried both. But I ride in the winter. Waxing helps prevent the dirt and brake dust adhering but does little against actual corrosion. IMHO, of course.
I am not sure if I read your post correctly, but the GL1800 wheels on the 01-10 bikes did not have clearcoat. Honda did not start that until the 2012 model.
 

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My '12 Goldwing has clear coat wheels rims, but I'm wondering about using any form of mild car wax on
them protecting from pitted corrosion I read here so often.

Reason for Concern:
Around 1993 I bought new a Ford Explorer with clear coated aluminum rims.
Over 10 years time, I had all rims replaced because of the coating peeling off and turning the rims yellow,
(like the old convertible non glass rear windows turned from the sun years back).
I do remember waxing these rims and wonder if I did them more harm then good waxing with a mild car wax.

Now I'm concern about using wax on my 2012 rims on my GL1800.
Does clear coat need any wax protection at all??
Isn't that the reason of clear coating, protecting what's underneath.

No, I'm not interesting in powder coating them.

Cheers!
The yellowing, as you probably know, is probably UV damage caused by the extreme sun you get in Florida. Even though UV resistance of clearcoat is vastly improved, it probably still isn't to the point where it can withstand the intense exposure it gets in places like Florida and the hot western states like Nevada, New Mexico, etc. Those areas are brutal on motorcycles. And the heat just adds a double whammy.

The modern high tech polishes claim that they have UV filtering properties. Who knows. Maybe they do. I can't claim either way. It certainly won't hurt. But your best bet is probably to avoid unnecessary exposure to the sun. If you ain't riding it, get it out of the sun. It will help the rest of your bike to stay looking new longer too. Of all the radios I work on from all over the country, radios from Florida and Nevada are usually in poor cosmetic condition from the sun, far worse than radios from other states. I can tell without even looking at the shipping label. The faceplates are badly faded and aged, and the gaskets are all disintegrated.
 

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I am not sure if I read your post correctly, but the GL1800 wheels on the 01-10 bikes did not have clearcoat. Honda did not start that until the 2012 model.

You're correct. I actually wish Honda never clearcoated the wheels. I had no problems cleaning them on my 2004.
They looked like new when I traded it on my 2012. The 2012 wheels show every stone nick and scratch.
 

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I am not sure if I read your post correctly, but the GL1800 wheels on the 01-10 bikes did not have clearcoat. Honda did not start that until the 2012 model.
Aha, they did in the UK. They were lacquered from day one. I think part of the laquer failure is due to the sharp corner on the spokes made by machining the diamond finish. There's very little thickness of laquer at that corner and the weather quite quickly gets through to the aluminium and corrodes beneath. Bare aluminium alloy doesn't last five minutes here, four seasons in one day, even in the summer sometimes! :surprise:
 

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As with your 93 Explorer, and your 2012 5th gen Wing, when it comes to "how to care for," "how to operate," and "how to maintain them," I would consult your Owner's Manual. Honda goes to great length to provide "care" instructions, and I would follow those long before I would follow anybody elses.

You gotta be kiddin' me! What red-blooded American boy reads an Owner's Manual?


Answer: Very few, evidently.>:)
 

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You gotta be kiddin' me! What red-blooded American boy reads an Owner's Manual?


Answer: Very few, evidently.>:)
I have no idea, however men do !!!
 

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Clearcoat (or any paint for that matter) does not adhere well to aluminum. When they are new, the clearcoat itself is what holds things together. One little opening in the clearcoat allows air, water, etc. to get underneath. Aluminum is very porous compared to steel, especially if it is cast (which I assume these are). This is why billet aluminum is so expensive. You can (and should) clean and polish your rims to maintain proper maintenance of the clearcoat, not the rims.


As others have stated, the biggest enemy to these wheels is UV. Eventually the UV will denigrate the clearcoat. It you use a UV blocking wax/polish, the clearcoat will last longer.


But nothing is going to last forever. As I stated, aluminum is porous, so any moisture in the air inflating your tires does have the ability to attack the wheels from the inside; however, you and I will be gone long before that effects function or beauty.


I worked in the non-ferrous industry for 30+ years. You would not believe all the testing and alloying R&D that goes on to make non-ferrous metals be more resistant to the elements, both natural and man-made. We spent $20 million a year trying to make aluminum and magnesium environmentally resistant, due to Federal MPG requirements, the need to make vehicles lighter, and based on the requirements of the US military.


Most non-ferrous metals are anodized or impregnated before applying any spray-on coating.
 
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