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My 2002 GL 1800 has 22,000 miles and I've noticed the transmission is very clunkly shifting when the bike warms up. For the first 5 miles, it is smooth and quiet, but after that it is very annoying.

I've only had the bike a few months and wondering if this is common with 1800's or am I facing tranny problems down the road. :shrug:

Thanks, Mick
 

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How long since the last oil change?
You might try changing the oil.
GoldWings clunk when shifting, oil changes help.
 

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I change oil every 4k and notice that they get clunky when I push the oil change intervolds over 6k. You will get lots of oppionions on here regaurding different oils.
 

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I agree that it's probably something that will improve with oil quality. You'll have to try a few different ones and decide what feels best to you.
 

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The bike is new to you? Sounds like you inherited someone elses problem. You were hosed. Change the oil
 

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02 with 22k? Woof

Downright bike abuse there.

Can you post a video?
Any shifting issues while riding?
 

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My 2002 GL 1800 has 22,000 miles and I've noticed the transmission is very clunkly shifting when the bike warms up. For the first 5 miles, it is smooth and quiet, but after that it is very annoying.

I've only had the bike a few months and wondering if this is common with 1800's or am I facing tranny problems down the road. :shrug:

Thanks, Mick

You have a PM.
 
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Contrary to popular belief - no oil will not change a thing. Changing oil is just the non-mechanics way of imagining an improvement.

Your transmission is clunky when cold for a very mechanically logical reason. The engine is cold.
Most of the clunky shifting really is not related so much to the transmission as it is to the engine itself. The 1800 is fuel injected and the throttle is notoriously non-linear.
The was a problem way back when Mikuni and Keihn introduced the CV carburetors. It was difficult to shift smoothly due to the quick off idle responds these new style carburetors provided. In time this problem was solved by changing the design.
On the wing the problem is the same. Quick uneven responds just off idle. Classic test is to try to make a slow speed U turn in first without slipping the clutch.
On the constant mesh transmissions it's important to manually sync the engine speed in order to achieve a smooth shift. Notice how smooth the shifting tends to be when accelerating quickly apposed to just easing through the gears?
At mild throttle opening it's very difficult to properly snyc up the speeds and due to this you get the jerking and hesitation which is miss interpreted as a clunky transmission. Carburetored machines like the Valkyries shift much smoother as the throttle is much more linear than the 1800 FI is.
Another example is the false power curve of the 1800. Ever notice most of the acceleration is from zero throttle to half? Past the half open state there is some extra but not near as much as the first half. On a carburetored motorcycle the power is applied in a much more linear fashion. In fact on most carbureted machines an awkward strong grip must be used so one can fully open the throttle for that maximum power output. On the GL all you need is half.

Just think about it and give it a test. I think you will find under load the bike seems fine it's when you baby it through the gears is when the problems arise.

If none of this makes sense - then start changing oil, it won't help but you will imagine it does. :roll:
 

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I have an 01 it has clunked for ever i bleed the the clutch fluid through the clutch slave clylinder i also went to honda syn=blend oil and when changing oil i replace 1 qt 10w40 with a qt of 20w50 of the same oil.When its cold its like yours shifts without clunk.
 

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Thank You for the post

Anytime, thanks for asking the clunk question. I too am new to the Wing World and just last week had the same identical question, however I chose to sit on it rather than ask. I can appreciate Storms explanation and totally agree with his analysis. Thank You!
 

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My 2002 GL 1800 has 22,000 miles and I've noticed the transmission is very clunkly shifting when the bike warms up. For the first 5 miles, it is smooth and quiet, but after that it is very annoying.
Most of us poor deluded souls think the oil used makes a significant difference. That's a very wide group of people, with different shifting techniques, different degrees of throttle control, using different rpms, different force, etc. Go figure.

So you might want to try a few experiments. You might be delusional too, in fact I'd bet on it. Note, though, that fresh oil most always feels better, even if you don't change brands. An interesting aspect of the delusion, that.
 

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The clunkiest is when the bike is downshifted into first gear while going too fast. Downshift to first only while coasting slowly to a stop.

2nd clunkiest is when upshifting into 2nd. That is why I like to shift into 2nd at 5 mph or slower.

There should only be a nice click sound when normally upshifting into 5th.

The Goldwing is famous for clunky shifting.

:thumbup:
:agree:
 

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I will not attempt to dispute the opinions posted here; rather, just give you my advice:

1. Your overall shifting technique may be at fault. The GL1800 shifts much smoother when rev-ed out a little, vs. "short-shifting" as on a V-Twin or other touring bikes. Try spinning it a little faster before each shift... you may find a major improvement.

2. Go ahead and change your oil to the correct viscosity as recommended in the manual, but a different brand. I suggest Honda's oil (blended by Idemitsu) as being quite satisfactory. Not that the oil itself is the culprid, but who knows what the previous owner had in it or when (if at all) he changed it. I personally use the Honda 10W-30 full synthetic and change it like clockwork at the 8k interval.

3. Have your clutch fluid flushed and replaced!!! Cannot stress this enough.

If you continue to have a tranny problem, then you may need to see a dealer... sorry. :money1:
 

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Its rusting-up from neglect of riding ;-)

I agree with Greg, the tranny is asking for an oil change. I change the oil and filter every 5,000. I am not sure why that happens, maybe the oil chain structure is breaking down, but I bet a used oil lanalysis would NOT indicate a problem even at full 8,000 interval.

prs
 

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I will not attempt to dispute the opinions posted here; rather, just give you my advice:

1. Your overall shifting technique may be at fault. The GL1800 shifts much smoother when rev-ed out a little, vs. "short-shifting" as on a V-Twin or other touring bikes. Try spinning it a little faster before each shift... you may find a major improvement.

2. Go ahead and change your oil to the correct viscosity as recommended in the manual, but a different brand. I suggest Honda's oil (blended by Idemitsu) as being quite satisfactory. Not that the oil itself is the culprid, but who knows what the previous owner had in it or when (if at all) he changed it. I personally use the Honda 10W-30 full synthetic and change it like clockwork at the 8k interval.

3. Have your clutch fluid flushed and replaced!!! Cannot stress this enough.

If you continue to have a tranny problem, then you may need to see a dealer... sorry. :money1:
If you find a dealer who can and will do something positively constructive about this complaint, post the specifics and we will all faint in unison.:lol:

prs
 

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1. Your overall shifting technique may be at fault. The GL1800 shifts much smoother when rev-ed out a little, vs. "short-shifting" as on a V-Twin or other touring bikes. Try spinning it a little faster before each shift... you may find a major improvement.
That will also reduce your gas mileage. My very personal choice is to shift at low rpm when I don't need to accelerate briskly, and get better mileage. I'm not much bothered by the clunk, probably because I used to ride a BMW :). The Honda shift recommendations in the owners manual have you spinning the engine at very low rpm, below 1500. So I don't think this qualifies as a fault, or is doing something bad to the engine.

I do find the Honda recommendations pretty low, even for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Found it!

Hey guys thanks for all the responses. The oil has 3K and the brake and clutch fluids were flushed with the oil change.


I think I discovered the source of the majority of the shifting noise. I rode it today and found it was getting worse , I could now feel the bike buck when the gear clunked in... I stopped and thought, this feels like a clutch issue.

I checked the handle bar clutch shift lever adjustment dial. 1-5 numbers on it and it was set to "1". I moved it to "5" and it seemed better... Much better. I than took it on a 100 mile ride in the mountains (Feather River Canyon) and 80% of the clunking noise was gone! Not sure what the 1-5 numbers mean, but 5 must give more pull on the clutch or pull it sooner.

It still is a little clunky, but I can live with this small annoyance.

Feeling of relief now...... ;);) I love my GL1800 again!

Mick
 
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